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Old 08-28-2017, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Central NY
4,655 posts, read 3,239,300 times
Reputation: 11912

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Quote:
Originally Posted by [B
Red On The Noodle[/b];49339580]Shadow -- I think I would have lost it with the case worker. Where did she expect your mother to go? Live under a bridge or something?

I dated a man whose maiden aunt was almost in the same situation, only she had no children to help. She was living in a tiny closet size room on next to nothing. She had worked all her life as a secretary, but her wages were so low that her SS was a pittance. She needed extensive dental work, but didn't have the funds and Medicaid wouldn't pay.

Her idea of a great dinner out was Kentucky Fried Chicken. She kept asking if we were sure we wanted to take her there as it was so expensive.

Broke my heart
TheShadow:

It's weird. It's almost like some people, who know how, have worked the system for years. They're not doing great, but at least they are housed, fed, and getting Medicaid. For someone who worked hard their whole life at menial jobs, with no benefits, and never took any assistance, trying to navigate the insane rules and hoops you have to jump through to get help is frustrating and there are traps at every turn. Without help from family, and someone who can be persistent in acquiring aid, it's easy to see how folks end up under the bridges. (end quote)



What struck me when I read these two posts is the fact that women were and still are on the short end of the stick when it comes to income. It's a pretty well-known fact that women in the workplace are paid so much less then men are. Granted, job descriptions vary, but the world needs to know that most of these women are not enhancing a husband's earnings. Their earnings are the ONLY earnings they get and more often than not, there are children involved. And sadly, some fathers do not contribute to their expenses.

We are a very sad country, starting with the paychecks/bonuses our politicians get.

Something is very wrong here and we need to change it fast.
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Old 08-28-2017, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Florida and New England
1,231 posts, read 1,416,614 times
Reputation: 1671
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYgal1542 View Post
What struck me when I read these two posts is the fact that women were and still are on the short end of the stick when it comes to income. It's a pretty well-known fact that women in the workplace are paid so much less then men are. Granted, job descriptions vary, but the world needs to know that most of these women are not enhancing a husband's earnings. Their earnings are the ONLY earnings they get and more often than not, there are children involved. And sadly, some fathers do not contribute to their expenses.
A big problem relates to some retirees not qualifying for a normal range of Social Security benefits, because of the sub-minimum nature of their wage. That could be changed easily -- no longer exempt "tipped" employees from the minimum wage. This would immediately help millions of waitresses who are now only marginal beneficiaries of our national pension scheme.

BTW, tipped employees are allowed to declare some part of their tip earnings and then pay social security taxes on them -- this is one method to increase the dollars in the base quarters for better social security payments after retirement. Of course it means fewer dollars during the working years.

There is also a secondary method to increase SS base quarter earnings, allowed for a small number of "short" years when, for example, a freelance worker has an unusually low yearly net -- the non-farm optional method. It's complicated, but this method can fill in a few gaps.

Social Security is quite progressive on the benefits side, especially for workers who have done 35 years between two and four multiples of the minimum wage. They probably have the best "deal" (percentage return) from the OASI system. It's still a frugal amount, but they may be able to live a reasonable retirement in a low COL area.
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Old 08-29-2017, 12:30 AM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
7,235 posts, read 4,128,251 times
Reputation: 15585
Quote:
Originally Posted by westender View Post
A big problem relates to some retirees not qualifying for a normal range of Social Security benefits, because of the sub-minimum nature of their wage. That could be changed easily -- no longer exempt "tipped" employees from the minimum wage. This would immediately help millions of waitresses who are now only marginal beneficiaries of our national pension scheme.

BTW, tipped employees are allowed to declare some part of their tip earnings and then pay social security taxes on them -- this is one method to increase the dollars in the base quarters for better social security payments after retirement. Of course it means fewer dollars during the working years.
Tipped employees are required to report ALL their tip income when they file their tax form. It's not a matter of being allowed...it's required. So all those people who thought they were getting over on the IRS by not reporting all or part of their tip income are going to find they screwed themselves out of the SS income they otherwise would have had.
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Old 08-29-2017, 02:45 AM
 
71,501 posts, read 71,674,131 times
Reputation: 49079
my buddy was a waiter and he got in trouble . they audited the restaurant and then broke the audit down to the waiter level .

the waiters had to give a portion of their tips to the rest of the staff. only they were supposed to 1099 those they gave money too. they got caught up having to pay over 10k for the taxes on the portion they gave away .
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Old 08-29-2017, 07:41 AM
 
71,501 posts, read 71,674,131 times
Reputation: 49079
let that be a heads up to the waiters here or those who have to farm out tips
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Old 08-29-2017, 09:21 AM
 
Location: equator
3,427 posts, read 1,527,565 times
Reputation: 8499
Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
my buddy was a waiter and he got in trouble . they audited the restaurant and then broke the audit down to the waiter level .

the waiters had to give a portion of their tips to the rest of the staff. only they were supposed to 1099 those they gave money too. they got caught up having to pay over 10k for the taxes on the portion they gave away .

This is tragic. Yet another blow to the lower-end employee! Where I worked, our credit card tips were listed on our paycheck (the vast majority of tips) and the 20% we had to share with others, was already deducted. So we were taxed on what we actually received, in the end. (except cash)


Thank goodness---I'm retired on much of that SS now.


This is a problem with the restaurant employers, who routinely fly under the radar along with the waitstaff. No other restaurants did what my employer did. Many waitstaff aren't paid a wage at ALL. Nobody seems to care....
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Old 08-29-2017, 09:33 AM
 
Location: Central IL
15,206 posts, read 8,513,923 times
Reputation: 35600
Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
my buddy was a waiter and he got in trouble . they audited the restaurant and then broke the audit down to the waiter level .

the waiters had to give a portion of their tips to the rest of the staff. only they were supposed to 1099 those they gave money too. they got caught up having to pay over 10k for the taxes on the portion they gave away .
It's crazy that waitstaff have to go through these gyrations with tips. The travesty is they should be paid a living wage so none of this is necessary.

What about hairdressers? They get lots of tips - is there the same degree of enforcement to them to report?
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Old 08-29-2017, 09:39 AM
 
71,501 posts, read 71,674,131 times
Reputation: 49079
generally all the things we can do our selves pay little . it is the things we can't do for ourselves or won't do for ourselves where the money is .

in the scheme of things the market and employers do not put much salary value on waiters . so it counts on tipping or appealing to the generosity of the customers to pay them more than the market values the job is worth .

right or wrong this is how markets value job functions .

if we all suddenly lost the use of our arms , those who could pour coffee would make more than doctors
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Old 08-29-2017, 09:40 AM
 
Location: SoCal
13,203 posts, read 6,313,926 times
Reputation: 9820
We should get rid of tips like Europe.
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Old 08-29-2017, 10:47 AM
 
Location: USA
1,815 posts, read 2,242,275 times
Reputation: 4139
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYgal1542 View Post

What struck me when I read these two posts is the fact that women were and still are on the short end of the stick when it comes to income. It's a pretty well-known fact that women in the workplace are paid so much less then men are. Granted, job descriptions vary, but the world needs to know that most of these women are not enhancing a husband's earnings. Their earnings are the ONLY earnings they get and more often than not, there are children involved. And sadly, some fathers do not contribute to their expenses.

We are a very sad country, starting with the paychecks/bonuses our politicians get.

Something is very wrong here and we need to change it fast.


You are correct NYgal -- women make much lower wages, even at the professional job level.


In my very early 20's I worked with a woman in her 60s and we remained friends after she retired. She shared how little her SS was, even though she worked all her life, no time off for kids. She received a very small pension, about $136 a month for 40 years of work. She was a manager at a very large national insurance company. Started there in the late 40's, early 50's and made squat. Since raises were a percentage of your pay, her pay did not increase to what new employees were making.


Yes, she could have quit and gone somewhere else. But by then companies were asking for college degrees for managers. There was also the security factor that she would not be laid off.


I digress . . . because of her sharing her finances with me, I "saw the light" and knew I would have to save like crazy, work that second job, live on next to nothing, so that I would not end up like her, buying a one pound pack of hamburger and making 7 patties out of it and that being my only meat for the entire week.


RIP Marion
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