U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-03-2017, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Northern panhandle WV
3,007 posts, read 2,167,665 times
Reputation: 6691

Advertisements

Just want to set the record straight, My house is not paid for, but the mortgage is $154. a month. taxes are about $500 a year.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-03-2017, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,723,738 times
Reputation: 32304
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasperhobbs View Post
Perhaps the people on this forum that constantly tell us how well they are doing can start a fund to aid others in need.
I couldn't let your snide, hostile little statement pass without comment. Although I cannot claim to be doing especially "well" (just living in reasonable, modest comfort), I can inform you that even someone at my level already has a "fund" required by law to "aid others in need". It's called taxes.

For the tax year 2016, I paid a combined total of $12,681 in federal and state income taxes. That does not include property taxes, sales taxes, and user fees. In addition to those taxes about which I have no choice, I voluntarily engage in charitable giving.

I, too, sometimes find it irritating to read the thinly disguised bragging of the fat cats; however I would point out that neither you nor I know anything about the generosity of those people toward the less fortunate, and therefore we should not be throwing brickbats at them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-03-2017, 01:15 PM
 
2,442 posts, read 2,067,677 times
Reputation: 5690
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I couldn't let your snide, hostile little statement pass without comment. Although I cannot claim to be doing especially "well" (just living in reasonable, modest comfort), I can inform you that even someone at my level already has a "fund" required by law to "aid others in need". It's called taxes.

For the tax year 2016, I paid a combined total of $12,681 in federal and state income taxes. That does not include property taxes, sales taxes, and user fees. In addition to those taxes about which I have no choice, I voluntarily engage in charitable giving.

I, too, sometimes find it irritating to read the thinly disguised bragging of the fat cats; however I would point out that neither you nor I know anything about the generosity of those people toward the less fortunate, and therefore we should not be throwing brickbats at them.
Point taken.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-03-2017, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Miraflores
780 posts, read 892,352 times
Reputation: 1518
Quote:
Originally Posted by moonlady View Post
you know, if you are on a fixed income, there are only really so many options: 1) live within your means, 2) supplement your income with some work, or 3) find programs and assistance for which you qualify. My brother hated the idea of getting any social services whatsoever, but faced with not being able to eat or pay the electric bill, he started looking at what he can qualify for. You just have to choose how to deal with your particular situation.
4. Hit the "reset button"!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-03-2017, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,648,620 times
Reputation: 35449
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
I think the topic really ought to be about how Seniors can live frugally.

Some people "just on SS" get the max amount which is about $2600 per month with the spousal benefit being half that. For a couple with a paid off house and car, that amount affords a reasonable standard of living if they reside in a low COL place.

For the people who need assistance, most places have a senior support system. If you look for some of the free newspapers at your grocery store you will see adds that point to those resources. Just visit the Senior Center in your city to connect with them.

As for a frugal lifestyle that's easy to learn. I learned it by necessity as a child in a family with 6 siblings and very little money.

As the song says, "The best things in life are free".
There already is a topic on the subject of frugality. What the OP was asking was very specific, how people living on SS only. Living frugally can be done on any income resources. But he or she is asking how they manage on SS alone. If you are living on or mostly on SS you don't need to be told how to be frugal chances are you are already doing that. It is helpful to know how others do it and what kind of assistance they can receive if necessary.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-03-2017, 03:14 PM
 
6,741 posts, read 3,851,875 times
Reputation: 15436
Quote:
Originally Posted by lenora View Post
You've just named a bunch of federally subsidized programs. It's probably good you retired when you did.
Churches and many food banks are not federally subsidized.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-03-2017, 03:15 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,741 posts, read 7,022,649 times
Reputation: 14219
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I couldn't let your snide, hostile little statement pass without comment. Although I cannot claim to be doing especially "well" (just living in reasonable, modest comfort), I can inform you that even someone at my level already has a "fund" required by law to "aid others in need". It's called taxes.

For the tax year 2016, I paid a combined total of $12,681 in federal and state income taxes. That does not include property taxes, sales taxes, and user fees. In addition to those taxes about which I have no choice, I voluntarily engage in charitable giving.

I, too, sometimes find it irritating to read the thinly disguised bragging of the fat cats; however I would point out that neither you nor I know anything about the generosity of those people toward the less fortunate, and therefore we should not be throwing brickbats at them.
And how about those of us who are card-carrying members of the "sandwich generation", sharing our resources with parents who've run out of their own money, and children who also need help. I know I'm far from alone in that category, and like most others we aren't rich either.

Moderator cut: inflammatory comment

Last edited by in_newengland; 03-03-2017 at 06:11 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-03-2017, 03:47 PM
 
491 posts, read 597,769 times
Reputation: 2095
One other thing I would add is try living on that amount now, while you still have options. If you still have a mortgage now, but won't then tract how much a month it will cost for taxes and insurance. I divide out those costs and tract them as a monthly expense, which for me is $265/mo. I would tract ever dime until I retired,and actually afterwards too, to get a feel for how it will be.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-03-2017, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,723,738 times
Reputation: 32304
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasperhobbs View Post
Point taken.

Thanks for being so gracious. I now realize I could have made exactly the same point without being quite so harsh.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-03-2017, 04:18 PM
 
4,430 posts, read 2,605,246 times
Reputation: 10289
Quote:
Originally Posted by arwenmark View Post
Just want to set the record straight, My house is not paid for, but the mortgage is $154. a month. taxes are about $500 a year.
Good, hopefully you can afford $200 for housing easily. At least you have that.
I only WISH my taxes were only $500/year {ours are $2900/yr and some would WISH they had taxes that low as us}.
I would expect rents in your area are at least comparable, and not sure if I'd trust a rental less than $200 anywhere in the country, though your area may have them.
And, our house isn't paid off yet, and NO, we don't have rentals, yet.

Just for the record also:
I lived for quite a while on my SSDI alone {$500/ m based on my working history of always working two jobs}} so I know well what it is like.
And I also know well what it is like to subsist on welfare when I could no longer work, {and had exhausted my retirement and was homeless}, and live on just $185/m for quite a while while it took the 5 years to get my SSDI approved. Compared to welfare, my SSDI made me "rich"!
And when MOH and I first got together, we had separate finances, and I paid MOH rent and a supplement for utilities came with my Medicaid in the form of HEAP {home energy assistance program}.

There are plenty of programs for senior and those on low incomes, I am assuming you are lower income on SS and not the maximum payout of around $2400/m.

We also looked in senior housing before we bought this house, because we had to do something, the old mobile home we lived in was really falling apart. With MOH over 55, we could live there and rents are a steady 31% of your income. Certain utilities are included {heat and water/sewer/garbage}, and some not {electric, cable, internet, phone}.

My fixed income is what it is {not anywhere near or even close to max payout at all}, and MOH is 58, only 4 years till MOH can claim early SS, though we are going to try to wait till MOH is at least 66, and hopefully 70 so to get the maximum MOH can get. MOH is having Hip issues with a disease called Pagets Disease, like osteoporosis, but adds bone mass to existing joints causing them to be painful. Eventually MOH will need a hip replacement, probably sooner than later. So working longer may NOT be an option for MOH.
We will at least have that {SSDI and SS}, and a paid for home, though we WOULD sell for what we can and the area we have selected for retirement we can easily buy another home much much cheaper than here...along the lines of your housing costs.
We DO have some savings for retirement, but anyone can tell you that can go fast, and as of now won't outlive us.

The rentals and inheritances {may have to cover nursing home care for our remaining fathers}are YET to be realized, so all we can count on is the SSDI and SS, and our retirement savings.

So due to my health and MOH's, we COULD end up on totally SS & SSDI alone, just like you. I've done it before and will again IF need be.

I really DO hope every one living on SS alone the best of luck, and I/we are making plans so hopefully we don't as I know what it is like to only have $5 to "blow" on a "shopping spree" at the dollar store once a month, and to shop for groceries, hopefully covering the month, once or twice a month. I also know what it is like to count TP squares and ration them until the next roll can be bought, or use washcolths. It is NOT easy, but I managed.

And anyone living on SS alone can call 2-1-1 for help and see what aging and low income programs are out there, your taxes paid for the programs, now, like SS, you can reap some rewards.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top