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Old 03-09-2017, 06:35 AM
 
Location: Hiding from Antifa?
6,429 posts, read 4,187,549 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by soulsurv View Post
Single, 60-yr-old lady would like to retire in 2 years (early social security if it's still there) to the Mid-Atlantic coast (SE PA to...?) on limited income (around 1600-1800 per month), but can purchase a small home, 150-200K, in full. Not looking to be by the water on that price obviously, and not looking for "communities" which are too restrictive for my liking. I prefer the burbs or slightly rural areas as long as I'm not isolated.

I find that I now crave a somewhat moderate climate without long periods of either humidity or freezing temperatures and access to good healthcare and veterinary care. I am a "dog-person" so walking areas are important for their and my exercise. I'm not a big shopper other than the basics and have no need of a social life other than a good bible church. I also would enjoy volunteering with at-risk youth, as I just adore them and have experience in the genre both professionally and on a volunteer basis.

So am I asking the impossible? I currently live in SE PA and the prices of EVERYTHING are becoming just too outrageous; I see the "handwriting on the wall," so to speak. THANKS IN ADVANCE!.
When you are 62, you can purchase a home using a reverse mortgage. There are caveats to doing that, but if you know where you want to live and find the perfect house, you can afford a house worth about 180% of the money you have to put into it. Remember though, that the real estate taxes and insurance will usually be higher with a higher value home. With 200K you could easily buy a house worth about $360k.

There will be a lot of people advising you not to do it, usually with good reasoning, but for some people it is a good way to afford more house with less, and not have a mortgage payment the rest of your life.
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Old 03-09-2017, 07:09 AM
 
Location: Hiding from Antifa?
6,429 posts, read 4,187,549 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gf2020 View Post
I would consider all of the Mid-Atlantic states to have humidity. Getting past that, however, I would look hard at Delaware. No income tax, low property taxes, good access to health care and cultural activities. Not too much of a "culture shock" coming from PA.
The Chesapeake Bay tends to moderate the climate around it and the land to its east. In the winter, most of the bad snowstorms miss it to the west. Occasionally a storm will approach from the south and come up the coast dumping a lot of snow there, but it is the exception rather than the rule. In the summer, it keeps the temperature a few degrees cooler than parts inland. It's not San Diego, but the temp/humidity combinations in the latitudes around the bay are not consistently high like they are to the south, nor consistently low in the winter like they are to the north. I don't like high humidity like you find in Florida, but I don't like it to be so dry you have to use something to keep from getting nosebleeds all the time either.

If you are going to live on the east coast, I feel the Chesapeake Bay region has the best climate available. We still live east of I95, which is a line that often can be used to differentiate weather patterns, especially in the winter.

I have lived on both sides of the bay, and I have reasons I like either side more. We recently moved to the west of the bay because that is where most of our family lives and that's where we find more services available that we may need when retired and aging. The problem with the eastern side of the bay is that you often have to drive a distance to get something you need. A lot of the people that live there, want to keep it that way.


Maryland is a slightly higher taxed state than Delaware, but it does have a lot more services to offer its residents. Some of these may be important to you when you get older. Social Security income in Maryland is not taxed.
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Old 03-09-2017, 09:10 AM
 
197 posts, read 161,154 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
OP, There are actually quite a few places in CA that you could afford. They will be far away from the large metro areas. I don't know about them all, but you could always post in the generic California forum to learn about more options than I know about.

A couple areas I know about first-hand that would actually meet your criteria by and large are Redding, CA (and the area around it) and Crescent City, CA.

I moved to Redding from the SF Bay Area so I could find low-income housing, which I couldn't afford in the SF Bay Area. Redding has everything you want, and the area is beautiful, with views of Mt. Shasta and Mt. Lassen, and a river running through town. And even though, it's in the central valley, it's just at the north end of it and it is a hilly city instead of flat like the rest of the valley, which I find to be really pretty. Redding population is around 92,000, I believe. So, it's a nice big town with lots of amenities.

The down side is that it's really, really hot for a very long summer. It's very dry, so no humidity problems. But, it was too hot for me. I spent one long summer there and headed for the coast lol. But, there is great healthcare, great shopping and lots of entertainment. And....drum roll please.....it's very dog friendly. There is a really great, really active dog club there, that incorporates activities of lots of other dog clubs.

Shasta Dogs

I really miss this dog group! I had just rescued my rat terrier, and we went to see if she could be good at fly ball. She wasn't a natural at it, but they were super welcoming. We also checked out the sighthound racing group, and they even have a group of other breeds they allow to race (other than sight hounds). That was also fun. Also went to watch the splash dogs that jump into the river or into swimming pools. I'd hoped to get my dog into that, or barn hunting, etc., but I just couldn't take the really hot days. If you can take the heat, you'd love it.

They also have dog walk outings where they work on distraction training, and avoiding snakes, just all kinds of great stuff. And there are great off-leash areas even right in town. Nice dog park, too.

Benton Dog Park | VisitRedding.com

The Turtle Bay East park is an off-leash large park right on the river, downtown.

http://media.jrn.com/images/2000*1332/TurtEast1.jpg

And, real estate is affordable. Here's a search of just single family homes max $150k in Shasta County (I did not include mobile homes):

Shasta County, CA Single Family Homes for Sale - realtor.com®

Another decent town about 30 minutes from Redding, is Red Bluff, which is in another county:

Red Bluff, CA Single Family Homes for Sale - realtor.com®

You'll also find that the affordable areas of CA outside the large metro areas, vote mostly Republican.

I don't know if this church would appeal to you, but there are many options. It just happens to be a large church in the area:

Home | Bethel Redding


The other area I know, is where I live now at the coast. Health care and shopping is really limited here, though the weather is really mild year-round. It rarely gets as hot as 80 degrees in summer, and rarely ever gets into the 30's in the night in winter. We've had some hail, lots of rain, but no snow. My motto here is: It ain't too hot and it ain't snowing - lol. It's cloudy and rainy a lot, and we can get some killer wind storms in winter.

It's breathtakingly beautiful - giant redwood forest just 7 miles out of town, and we're right on the ocean. It's a crab fishing and logging community, relying heavily on summer tourist season. It's a very poor county and the town has zero charm, as the old downtown area was wiped out in a tsunami in the 60's. Quite a few boarded up buildings, etc. Population in town is about 5,000. Very dog friendly, but no organized groups and no fenced dog park, although you won't usually get any grief for having your dogs off leash at the parks or most of the beaches.

We even have a lighthouse.

Battery Point (Crescent City) Lighthouse, California at Lighthousefriends.com

Redwoods:

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=413

This Crescent City Harbor website has a nice slide show of the area. Just let it sit there and watch the slide show:

Crescent City Harbor District

And it's also affordable:

Crescent City, CA Single Family Homes for Sale - realtor.com®

You need to be aware that some properties are in the tsunami zone, and that might be why some of them are cheaper than you'd expect them to be.

But, as I say, it's a beautiful place and you'll find it's mostly Republican, and there are several active churches here. But, it is a poor area, and the town is not very attractive. The surrounding nature definitely is.

There are properties outside of town, too, that are also warmer once you get a little bit inland from the coast, and you could have more acreage or privacy.

At any rate, there are definitely areas in CA that could work for you.

One good thing about buying property in CA, is that the property taxes here stay based on the original sales price when you buy it, no matter how long you own it, it will never be reassessed. That is reassuring, knowing your taxes won't ever go so high that you have to lose your home. By law, the taxes can only go up something like 1% per year, I think. The law is Proposition 13, if you want to look up how it works.

The only thing you'll miss about the humidity back east, is the fireflies. Magical creatures. I have always lived on the west coast, but for 5 years in the Nashville area in TN. Loved the fireflies and the red birds. Really hated the weather :-)

Best of luck to you!
Now that is what I call a useful and positive post
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Old 03-09-2017, 10:44 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,652 posts, read 40,020,325 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ukgirl49 View Post
Now that is what I call a useful and positive post
for an OP that insists on staying on the east coast,,,...()

but... there are MANY other readers Millions!
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Old 03-09-2017, 12:11 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,544 posts, read 62,270,607 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ukgirl49 View Post
Now that is what I call a useful and positive post
Save it up for someone interested in CA
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Old 03-10-2017, 03:32 PM
 
708 posts, read 503,673 times
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Tennessee is a beautiful state with low cost of living. Just saying....
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Old 03-10-2017, 08:13 PM
 
Location: Kennett Square, PA
1,699 posts, read 2,609,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruzincat View Post

I have lived on both sides of the bay, and I have reasons I like either side more. We recently moved to the west of the bay because that is where most of our family lives and that's where we find more services available that we may need when retired and aging. The problem with the eastern side of the bay is that you often have to drive a distance to get something you need. A lot of the people that live there, want to keep it that way.


Maryland is a slightly higher taxed state than Delaware, but it does have a lot more services to offer its residents. Some of these may be important to you when you get older. Social Security income in Maryland is not taxed.
Interesting...I know that MD has much better healthcare than does DE, so it's worth considering. Any towns west of the bay that are affordable and safe? Thanks so much!
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Old 03-11-2017, 05:33 AM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,544 posts, read 62,270,607 times
Reputation: 32280
Quote:
Originally Posted by soulsurv View Post
Interesting...I know that MD has much better healthcare (insurance plans) than does...
As to the actual care/treatment available to be received...
Bigger City vs backwater becomes the question.

Quote:
Any towns west of the bay that are affordable and safe?
There is no life west of the Chesapeake Bay (1970's bumper sticker slogan)
Attached Thumbnails
Am I asking the IMPOSSIBLE?-chesapeake_bay_bumper_bumper_sticker.jpg  
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Old 03-11-2017, 05:49 AM
 
Location: Hiding from Antifa?
6,429 posts, read 4,187,549 times
Reputation: 5727
Quote:
Originally Posted by soulsurv View Post
Interesting...I know that MD has much better healthcare than does DE, so it's worth considering. Any towns west of the bay that are affordable and safe? Thanks so much!
Arnold, Severna Park, Cape St Clair(might actually show as Annapolis but it is on the other side of the Severn River). As far as being safe, population density is lower on the ES, which means there is less crime, but no better odds that you won't be a victim. If you are in a higher density area with relatively low crime, there might be more crime, but less of a chance you will be affected by it.

That said, you will find the housing costs considerably lower on the eastern shore, the farther you go east from the Bay Bridge. If healthcare is a primary issue, though, you might want to look on the WS.
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Old 07-10-2017, 05:08 AM
 
Location: Kennett Square, PA
1,699 posts, read 2,609,289 times
Reputation: 2594
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruzincat View Post
The Chesapeake Bay tends to moderate the climate around it and the land to its east. In the winter, most of the bad snowstorms miss it to the west. Occasionally a storm will approach from the south and come up the coast dumping a lot of snow there, but it is the exception rather than the rule. In the summer, it keeps the temperature a few degrees cooler than parts inland. It's not San Diego, but the temp/humidity combinations in the latitudes around the bay are not consistently high like they are to the south, nor consistently low in the winter like they are to the north. I don't like high humidity like you find in Florida, but I don't like it to be so dry you have to use something to keep from getting nosebleeds all the time either.

If you are going to live on the east coast, I feel the Chesapeake Bay region has the best climate available. We still live east of I95, which is a line that often can be used to differentiate weather patterns, especially in the winter.

I have lived on both sides of the bay, and I have reasons I like either side more. We recently moved to the west of the bay because that is where most of our family lives and that's where we find more services available that we may need when retired and aging. The problem with the eastern side of the bay is that you often have to drive a distance to get something you need. A lot of the people that live there, want to keep it that way.


Maryland is a slightly higher taxed state than Delaware, but it does have a lot more services to offer its residents. Some of these may be important to you when you get older. Social Security income in Maryland is not taxed.
Hi. I'm revisiting my thread. It's typical of me to start my loud GROANING about the humidity here in SE PA (about 12 miles outside of Philly) in early-mid July, and I groan LOUDER every year!!! I often make imperious proclamations to the dogs (since I live alone) that I am MOVING NORTH in the future; that is, until the snow and freezing rain hit us in the winter. Used to love the snow, and still LOVE to drive in it, believe it or not, but I am terrified, at my age, of falling on ice as many do here. Ain't pretty.

Your post makes a great deal of sense to me and my needs. Can you recommend a couple of towns for me to research and possibly visit this Fall? And I believe you said East of the bay has the least humidity? THANKS SO MUCH
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