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Old 03-04-2017, 08:10 PM
 
Location: God's Country
5,188 posts, read 3,503,825 times
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Guess I shouldn't have retired in 1997.


https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/03/b...alth.html?_r=0
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Old 03-04-2017, 08:14 PM
 
510 posts, read 304,241 times
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How about people whose job is killing them? What you're seeing here is survivor bias

People who are still healthy and are not forced to stop working and who like their jobs show up in larger numbers among those healthy, happy people who are still working. The other people were forced out, retired, or are dead already.

The job has nothing to do with good health. Good health has everything to do with whether or not you're still working.
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Old 03-04-2017, 08:50 PM
 
Location: SoCal
13,221 posts, read 6,320,879 times
Reputation: 9827
There's always risk to everything, even retirement.
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Old 03-04-2017, 09:12 PM
 
4,432 posts, read 2,609,683 times
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I agree with Fallstaf,

FOr those HEALTHY enough, nad CAN work, working longer may benefit them.

I no longer work as I am disabled, have been for years, not because a job is killing me or making me healthy. I CAN work part time and do what I can, when I feel up to it.

Last year was NOT a year health wise for me to return to work. I had pneumonia for 15 weeks, including hospitalization which nearly killed me twice; I tore my ACL and MCL ligaments in my knee; I had R shoulder surgery, I had neck surgery, I was in a bad car accident, I had left shoulder surgery, I had a total of 32 weeks of PT for all things combined...
This year I was going to return part time, but now I'm facing another neck surgery, and back surgery, time will tell how I cope. I am in a last ditch effort PT for my back before the MRI results show what exactly the neurosurgeon can do for me.

Working longer, IF I was healthy, MIGHT be healthy! Or HealthIER.
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Old 03-04-2017, 09:37 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,732,288 times
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I read the entire article. The research is mixed and is difficult to interpret, according to several researchers quoted in the article. But on balance, it seems that the continued mental challenges and socialization of work are beneficial. Social isolation is deadly and people do better if they have a purpose, a reason to get up in the morning. Researchers are smart enough to be aware of survivor bias and to control for it.

Being retired, per se, does not have to mean that cognitive challenges and meaningful social contacts are missing. People can create those in retirement, whether through volunteer work or by other means. What I take away from the article is wisdom which is not at all new - to remain vital and vibrant as we age, we need to be remain active, both mentally and physically, and we need to have meaningful contact with other human beings.
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Old 03-04-2017, 10:23 PM
 
655 posts, read 309,648 times
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Funny that it equates "social isolation" with retirement! I equate that with work since my nearest "coworker" is 2000 miles away . . . .

All the retirees I know are very very busy - exercising, volunteering. etc.
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Old 03-04-2017, 10:30 PM
 
510 posts, read 304,241 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ihatetodust View Post
Funny that it equates "social isolation" with retirement! I equate that with work since my nearest "coworker" is 2000 miles away . . . .

All the retirees I know are very very busy - exercising, volunteering. etc.
An excellent point. Work sequesters you and actually limits opportunity for socializing or at least limits it's variability. Work keeps you cordoned off and limits socializing primarily to work and the people you work with and anything else is on an "as available" basis.
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Old 03-05-2017, 07:13 AM
 
6,791 posts, read 3,859,912 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fallstaff View Post
An excellent point. Work sequesters you and actually limits opportunity for socializing or at least limits it's variability. Work keeps you cordoned off and limits socializing primarily to work and the people you work with and anything else is on an "as available" basis.
Yes, and as we get older our work associations become younger and younger, which unfortunately often increases the feelings of isolation at work.
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Old 03-05-2017, 08:09 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,475,774 times
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I'd rather be sick!
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Old 03-05-2017, 08:14 AM
 
11,978 posts, read 5,115,487 times
Reputation: 18724
Quote:
Originally Posted by fallstaff View Post
How about people whose job is killing them? What you're seeing here is survivor bias

People who are still healthy and are not forced to stop working and who like their jobs show up in larger numbers among those healthy, happy people who are still working. The other people were forced out, retired, or are dead already.

The job has nothing to do with good health. Good health has everything to do with whether or not you're still working.
Exactly and well stated.
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