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Old 03-09-2017, 04:50 PM
 
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I think having kids later in life (at 40-45+) is another recipe for fighting-off an early decline. The natural chemical processes in the 55-yo body of a mom of young kids are different from the processes in the body of her friend whose children are 30+ year old adults...
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Old 03-09-2017, 05:33 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
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Originally Posted by want to learn View Post
I know LOTS of people in who are losing their mental abilities in their 50s and 60s. The David Cassidy story of how someone only 66 years old can being fighting Dementia really hit home.

I am only 62 and I am not nearly as sharp as I was just a few years ago. Many people I know are showing signs of dementia at an early age.


.............................

OP, I can't think of anyone I know who is losing mental abilities in their 50's and 60's. However, I have no reason to disbelieve your report about the ones you know. But it does make me curious. Have you noticed any commonality among them, such as alcohol or other drug abuse? How about life-long smoking? Is there any commonality of educational level?


Very interesting, and of course scary as hell.
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Old 03-09-2017, 05:37 PM
 
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[quote=Mr5150;47453864

About 15 years ago I had a colleague, who developed early onset dementia in his late 40s. I believe he died in less than a year.[/QUOTE]

Word-finding slowness or difficulty or "I can picture the movie star, I just can't think of the name" and then the name comes to you... all very normal and not a sign of dementia.

Early-onset dementia is often early fatal. A relatively sudden onset, loss of numerous functions and relatively rapid death. Early onset Alzheimer's (as determined by cognitive tests) appears to be quite genetic.

Yes, drug/alcohol ingestion certainly can cause early dementia. Like any illness, some people are more vulnerable than others and no one yet knows why.

I have a friend of 68 who insists that she cannot remember things from 15 minutes ago or 15 years ago. Yet she owns two houses and seems to keep very good track of practical matters of maintenance, tenants, legalities. I suggested that she see a neurologist if she's so concerned that she is headed down that slippery slope. I just don't think she is. She even earns a small living by helping much older people sort out their affairs while still living in their homes.
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Old 03-09-2017, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
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Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
Word-finding slowness or difficulty or "I can picture the movie star, I just can't think of the name" and then the name comes to you... all very normal and not a sign of dementia.

Early-onset dementia is often early fatal. A relatively sudden onset, loss of numerous functions and relatively rapid death. Early onset Alzheimer's (as determined by cognitive tests) appears to be quite genetic.


Yes, drug/alcohol ingestion certainly can cause early dementia. Like any illness, some people are more vulnerable than others and no one yet knows why.

I have a friend of 68 who insists that she cannot remember things from 15 minutes ago or 15 years ago. Yet she owns two houses and seems to keep very good track of practical matters of maintenance, tenants, legalities. I suggested that she see a neurologist if she's so concerned that she is headed down that slippery slope. I just don't think she is. She even earns a small living by helping much older people sort out their affairs while still living in their homes.
This is what we feared with my former sister-in-law, but it has been about 18 years and she is still living.
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Old 03-09-2017, 06:27 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
This is what we feared with my former sister-in-law, but it has been about 18 years and she is still living.
All of the dementias are very mean diseases, as you know. If only something could be discovered to alleviate any or all of them.
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Old 03-09-2017, 07:07 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
<snip> Yes, drug/alcohol ingestion certainly can cause early dementia. Like any illness, some people are more vulnerable than others and no one yet knows why.

I have a friend of 68 who insists that she cannot remember things from 15 minutes ago or 15 years ago. Yet she owns two houses and seems to keep very good track of practical matters of maintenance, tenants, legalities. I suggested that she see a neurologist if she's so concerned that she is headed down that slippery slope. I just don't think she is. She even earns a small living by helping much older people sort out their affairs while still living in their homes.
She sounds like me. Unless she's fabulously wealthy, advise her to purchase LTC insurance before she even considers undergoing cognitive testing. Unbeknownst to me at the time, that was probably the best financial decision I have ever made in my entire life.
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Old 03-09-2017, 07:12 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Pyewackette View Post
That's only true for SOME people.

The rest of us have cognitive impairments that are physiological in nature. Mine started in my 30s, but I was starting from such a high point that it took a really long time for it to become a problem obvious enough that even *I* saw it.

I have a variety of cognitive impairments stemming from long-term fibromyalgia. For me, the cognitive issues are much much worse than the pain, and they come and go depending on how much I am in "remission". These include problems with word finding, word substitution, memory loss, occasional corner-of-the-eye hallucinations (when I'm in really bad shape I will "see" bugs zipping around, but I know there are no actual bugs even then). I can't make reasonable goals, I can't make decisions, and I have no sense of passing time. Lots of executive function losses.

This is age related in that as I age, the fibro gets harder to overcome. Hence - someone who was formerly at the top of the game as a software engineer now can't remember how to operate a cash register without a cheat sheet. I've had to give up my library card after forgetting a batch of books and running up $100+ in overdue fees. I'm getting a whitelist device so I can have a landline again - because when things are bad I'm easily taken advantage of.

It's happened. I recognize it and know it will happen again. Therefore I am taking steps now to make certain things habitual so that when I am non compos mentis protections THAT I AM WELL USED TO are already in place.
Am so sorry you are going through this!
Have you ever been tested for Lyme disease? I've had two friends diagnosed with long-term fibromyalgia who later found out they had chronic Lyme disease with similar cognitive and other symptoms you are describing.
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Old 03-09-2017, 07:21 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
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Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
All of the dementias are very mean diseases, as you know. If only something could be discovered to alleviate any or all of them.
If only is right. A few of my friends have dealt/are dealing with this with elderly parents. My mom is still fairly sharp at 88. I am fortunate in that regard. But, she has lost friends to dementia, which is sad, in addition to all the losses you experience to death by that age.
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Old 03-09-2017, 07:23 PM
 
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This is not popular to say and never has been, but a lot of cases are really from an std that has gotten into the brain.
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Old 03-09-2017, 09:34 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
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Originally Posted by norman_w View Post
This is not popular to say and never has been, but a lot of cases are really from an std that has gotten into the brain.
I don't know how accurate your statement is, but I remember my sister telling me of such a case. She worked as an ER nurse in the early 80s, and one night family members brought in a grandmother who seemed to have rather rapidly begun to appear mentally ill. They set her up for a scan for a brain tumor, but meanwhile, her bloodwork came back, and showed syphilis. She'd served as a nurse overseas in WW1 as a young woman, and must have picked up syphilis that went underground and now 60+ years later, was affecting her brain.
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