U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Thread summary:

Future of the United States, Baby boomer generation responsible for current status of country, opinions how next generation to help country

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-11-2008, 06:24 AM
 
Location: New Orleans Louisiana
156 posts, read 353,304 times
Reputation: 215

Advertisements

At a doctor's appointment I went to the other day, we somehow ended up chatting about the way things are today. I was sort of surprised at his view although I tend to agree somewhat. It was just funny I guess hearing it from your doctor. He said something to the effect of.."Our generation really screwed things up didn't it?"....And then we talked a minute about our parents(he is the same age as me)...How the challenges of their time(depression, WWII) were so much greater and they somehow persevered.

So did the baby boomer generation screw it all up? Could we (either individually or as a group) have done anything differently that would have improved our country today? Will the next generation do any better? Or is it all just part of the ups and downs of any country over time, not attributable to any generation?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-11-2008, 08:11 AM
 
1,861 posts, read 3,033,325 times
Reputation: 559
Quote:
Originally Posted by GregoryS View Post
At a doctor's appointment I went to the other day, we somehow ended up chatting about the way things are today. I was sort of surprised at his view although I tend to agree somewhat. It was just funny I guess hearing it from your doctor. He said something to the effect of.."Our generation really screwed things up didn't it?"....And then we talked a minute about our parents(he is the same age as me)...How the challenges of their time(depression, WWII) were so much greater and they somehow persevered.

So did the baby boomer generation screw it all up? Could we (either individually or as a group) have done anything differently that would have improved our country today? Will the next generation do any better? Or is it all just part of the ups and downs of any country over time, not attributable to any generation?
Well, I'd say we did OTHER things, although I would never say the things we did are more important than winning WWII - thanks, Dad.

One of the BIG things our generation did was work toward civil rights for blacks, women's rights, gay rights, etc. We made it possible for people to be who they are, and go where they wanted to go, etc.

I think a lot of young women have NO idea what we did in the 1970's for women today who have better jobs than we EVER thought of having and salaries we never thought of earning. They act as if women always had those opportunities - how do you think they got those?? From women of the 70's, thank you very much.

We still make only 76 cents to a man's dollar, but it used to be more like 50 cents, or less.

Just like when I was young, I never appreciated what my parents generation did - I don't think kids today have any idea how lucky they are with the freedoms we obtained in our day. It's just taken for granted.

And, no, I wouldn't say we "screwed up" anymore than anyone else.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2008, 09:24 AM
 
Location: New Orleans Louisiana
156 posts, read 353,304 times
Reputation: 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by cousinsal View Post
Well, I'd say we did OTHER things, although I would never say the things we did are more important than winning WWII - thanks, Dad.

One of the BIG things our generation did was work toward civil rights for blacks, women's rights, gay rights, etc. We made it possible for people to be who they are, and go where they wanted to go, etc.

I think a lot of young women have NO idea what we did in the 1970's for women today who have better jobs than we EVER thought of having and salaries we never thought of earning. They act as if women always had those opportunities - how do you think they got those?? From women of the 70's, thank you very much.

We still make only 76 cents to a man's dollar, but it used to be more like 50 cents, or less.

Just like when I was young, I never appreciated what my parents generation did - I don't think kids today have any idea how lucky they are with the freedoms we obtained in our day. It's just taken for granted.

And, no, I wouldn't say we "screwed up" anymore than anyone else.

Good points there cousin. Things I haven't thought about in a long time. I must admit you caught me off guard a little bit. I think I expected your assessment to be just a bit more critical. That's why you always ask someone else's opinion I guess...it might surpise you and make you think...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2008, 02:38 PM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
15,400 posts, read 25,910,151 times
Reputation: 18993
I depends on how you look at the phrase "The Greatest Generation."

From a standpoint of accomplishments, I think the 60's generation gets an A. Their accomplishments were in breaking down barriers, diversifying institutions and neighborhoods, and creating a sense of possibility. All kinds of people went to college who never went to college before; of all the changes of the 60's this one (and birth control) had the most profound effect. For example, look at the number of women, minorities, and handicapped people in office today. This was also the first generation to become concerned about the environment--that may not seem significant now but I think people in the future will think of the 60's as an environmental turning point that had a major effect on the history of the world.

However...

Some people use the phrase "The Greatest Generation" to talk about the general strength and endurance of people. Our generation gets a C- here. We are the healthiest generation in so many ways... but we are so weak and we are so whiney. If we had to last in pioneer times (or even in the 40's) we wouldn't do very well. We have very little endurance, we have an unhealthy self-centered sense of entitlement, and we're way too sensitive. Just my opinion, of course, but I'm regularly embarrassed by my generation in this way. On the plus side, however, at least we don't have some of the emotional problems that being overly stoic can cause.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2008, 11:47 PM
 
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah
7,731 posts, read 12,230,722 times
Reputation: 5948
I think the greatest generation were the people born in the 1910s-late 1930s. They persevered through The Great Depression and learned the value of a nickel and that you have to work for everything you want. They fought in two wars-World War II and the Korean Conflict and after they came back, they wanted to make a difference in the world and provide a better world for their children and grandchildren to live in than they did, and they succeeded.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2008, 04:30 AM
 
Location: Ohio
2,178 posts, read 8,122,355 times
Reputation: 3915
I agree with Cottonwoods post. My dad was born in 1913. No car to hop in and have Mom drive him to school. He walked or rode a horse. Fought in WW2 for 4 years. Survived the Battle of the Bulge and the Seigfried line. His company liberated the Dauchau prison camp. My Mom still has the pictures taken there. He saw things that I hope none of us ever have to see. He lived through the depression.
No money. Made clothes out of flour sacks. If the family wanted meat for supper they went out in the woods and shot it. No electricity where they lived. Coal oil lamps. No doctor within miles.
Raised on a farm in W.va and had to spend the day doing the things that had to be done just to exist. Entertainment was the family getting together and playing music on the rickity frt porch on Saturday night.
He lived to be 83 yrs old. He never complained. He never asked for anything other than the opportunity to have a chance to earn what he could. He didn't expect for anything to be given to him. He had no problem with working for it. I seen him go to work when he was so sick he couldn't hardly walk. He was used to doing what had to be done and there was no excuse for not doing that. He was 5'6" and never weighed over 140 lbs in his life but he was the biggest man I ever knew.
I've raised 6 kids. Worked all my adult life to provide my wife and family a good home and I consider myself a man from a good generation.
But what I've endured can't compare with what his generation went through. He left me with good advice and family values but
I'll never be the man my Dad was. In my opinion him and the people in his age group was the greatest generation
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2008, 05:39 AM
 
Location: New Orleans Louisiana
156 posts, read 353,304 times
Reputation: 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robhu View Post
I agree with Cottonwoods post. My dad was born in 1913. No car to hop in and have Mom drive him to school. He walked or rode a horse. Fought in WW2 for 4 years. Survived the Battle of the Bulge and the Seigfried line. His company liberated the Dauchau prison camp. My Mom still has the pictures taken there. He saw things that I hope none of us ever have to see. He lived through the depression.
No money. Made clothes out of flour sacks. If the family wanted meat for supper they went out in the woods and shot it. No electricity where they lived. Coal oil lamps. No doctor within miles.
Raised on a farm in W.va and had to spend the day doing the things that had to be done just to exist. Entertainment was the family getting together and playing music on the rickity frt porch on Saturday night.
He lived to be 83 yrs old. He never complained. He never asked for anything other than the opportunity to have a chance to earn what he could. He didn't expect for anything to be given to him. He had no problem with working for it. I seen him go to work when he was so sick he couldn't hardly walk. He was used to doing what had to be done and there was no excuse for not doing that. He was 5'6" and never weighed over 140 lbs in his life but he was the biggest man I ever knew.
I've raised 6 kids. Worked all my adult life to provide my wife and family a good home and I consider myself a man from a good generation.
But what I've endured can't compare with what his generation went through. He left me with good advice and family values but
I'll never be the man my Dad was. In my opinion him and the people in his age group was the greatest generation

I know exactly what you are talking about...I have very similar feelings about my Dad who was born in 1922. My Dad was from a small town in southwest Missouri. It was truly amazing what they endured and like you said...without complaining. And those values and memories they left us with are so important and always with us. So good to hear about your remarkable Dad.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2008, 09:36 AM
 
1,861 posts, read 3,033,325 times
Reputation: 559
I think we're very spoiled because of our parents going through so much. They didn't want their children to suffer as they did, so we got really spoiled in the 50's and 60's.

Any parent, I guess, would want the best for their kids, and they were no different. And, in those days, with the prosperity after WWII, they could do it. I think it made my father very proud to have gone to college (as no one else in the family did), become a professional, and be able to support his family and send 2 kids to college.

We have to appreciate it, and get rid of the "entitlement" idea at the same time.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-13-2008, 08:09 PM
 
Location: New Orleans Louisiana
156 posts, read 353,304 times
Reputation: 215
Thanks to everyone who posted...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-14-2008, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Branson Area
880 posts, read 2,594,754 times
Reputation: 710
I think each generation adds value to the overall picture. My dad fought in WWII and HIS dad endured the great despression from a parental viewpoint. My dad joined the army to get a steady meal (his words) and fight the enemy. MY generation fought in Viet Nam (and many died, those who came home were not treated well but they went "for their country"). We fought for equal rights, womens rights, family rights, brought down the Berlin wall, etc. We made telecommunications global and effective, we embraced mobility, free speech, etc.

I also think each generation has added to the negative side of the equation..my Dad's generation developed nuclear bombs, polluted rivers and streams, developed processed convenvience foods (could be pro or con depending on your view), add chemicals to foods. My generation developed a need for material goods, looked at throwaway material goods as a way of life. While we cleaned and vilified pollution of the streams we continued to add to the pollution of the air. We began the clearing of the Amazon jungle and both began and ended clear cut of timber. The current adult generation is embracing a better environment (or at least their kids are), fighting wars that they are sent to fight. Many do have a real sense of entitlement based on being given so much from our generation. Many, but not all, have poor communication skills but have computer skills built into their sense like we had the use of the phone build into ours. Many, and again not all, view violance as "normal". Who knows what this generation will add to our world as the next generation comes to fruition. However, I believe that ALL generations are great in their own way.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:32 PM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top