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Old 08-07-2017, 08:44 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,651,778 times
Reputation: 35449

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Yes, I relocated when I retired. Two reasons, the COL in my former city had become way too high and it had changed so drastically I realized I was in a place that no longer felt right for me. The move worked out very well.
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Old 08-08-2017, 01:04 AM
 
Location: On the road
5,922 posts, read 2,885,080 times
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Relocation can be a natural part of retirement, since often the choice of where to live is dictated by work.

If no more need to commute to a job, what is important in a home can change.
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Old 08-08-2017, 04:14 AM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,651,778 times
Reputation: 35449
Quote:
Originally Posted by lieqiang View Post
Relocation can be a natural part of retirement, since often the choice of where to live is dictated by work.

If no more need to commute to a job, what is important in a home can change.
Absotively! And just because one moves to more suitable surroundings in later years doesn't have to mean hobbies or interests must be given up. Sometimes relocating is a good opportunity to discover new activities as well. The best part is having the free time to do them.

I actually wanted to relocate even before I retired but the idea of trying to find a new job in a new city was too daunting. Retirement freed me to move on.
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Old 08-08-2017, 12:27 PM
 
1,320 posts, read 643,753 times
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Just wondering where those of you moved to at retirement. So far Hubby and I are considering Florida. We do love Maine, but not the winters. We really do not want to be snowbirds.
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Old 08-08-2017, 02:11 PM
 
2,626 posts, read 4,949,307 times
Reputation: 2220
I grew up in Indiana, moved to southeast Florida for my career. After 43 years in Florida, I moved back to Indiana. I am very happy in the Midwest.
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Old 08-08-2017, 09:24 PM
 
Location: Southern Oregon coast
480 posts, read 506,539 times
Reputation: 1540
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
One thing that I've never understood is why people want to make often substantial life changes going into retirement or old age when they've lived certain ways for many years.

If you've lived somewhere for twenty or thirty years, you probably don't hate it or you would have done something about it before then. If you truly hated and gutted it out for the majority of your life, for whatever reason, that's on your fault.

I've lived in six different states since 2010, from metro Boston to rural southwest Virginia, to affluent suburban communities in Iowa and Indiana, and have traveled pretty extensively. I consider myself quite fortunate to have lived in a number of places with a number of different lifestyles. Over the years, I've basically figured out pretty well what I like and do not like.

1) Could not live in Boston permanently. Took expensive and congested. Fun place to visit, but would never want to live in a metro that size.

2) Places like Indy may be a bit too large. Congestion, getting around, is much better than Boston, but still a hassle compared to smaller metros. I may consider an Indy, Charlotte, or Nashville size metro, but it is not my first option. I loved all the suburban creature comforts and wouldn't mind going back if I could avoid a lot of the rush hour congestion.

3) Small towns and rural areas do not have enough economic vitality, are poor, have a poor dating scene, shopping, things to do, etc., for me to be happy. I moved back to TN from IN last year. We have nowhere near the level of amenities that I was used to in Indiana. If you go shopping here, selection is terrible. Some items are far more expensive than in mainstream USA - auto insurance increased by 50% and groceries are far more expensive than in Indiana. If I lose my well-paying job in this area, it's likely I'd have to move to make anywhere close to what I currently do. If you have a sophisticated medical need, it may not be able to be addressed here. We're nearly two hours from any other metros of consequence. There are a lot of drawbacks.

When I moved back to TN last year, I thought I'd be happier. While it is nice to be around family and long-term friends and to have a more stable job, the bottom line is that I simply don't like living in such a small, isolated area. I may stay another couple of years in this area, but I'm not going to gut it out here much beyond that.

I would never live in a super major city or a small town/rural area. I've experienced both and I'm self-aware enough to know what I want and it's in between those extremes - think mid-sized metros like Knoxville, TN, Greenville, SC, Grand Rapids, MI, etc. Those places can provide 80%-90% of the benefits of a larger metro like Indy with a fraction of the hassle.

I've seen lots of posts on the TN boards from people who have little knowledge or familiarity with Tennessee, who are wanting to move to some backwater rural area in the state (these areas have high crime, lots of drug abuse/domestic issues, aren't very welcoming to outsiders, etc.), thinking small town TN is like Mayberry, a Pigeon Forge promo brochure, or Hee-Haw. They're often from the usual urban area suspects - NYC, Boston, CA, etc. These people are jerking themselves out of a lifestyle they've presumably become comfortable with, plopping themselves into a completely different culture and lifestyle. Many of these moves end in abject failure.
Forgive me for pointing out the obvious, but the OP asked if one had moved AFTER retirement. You are still working, no? But hey, thanks for letting us know what sort of town/suburb/small city is acceptable to you.

As for your lack of understanding as to why someone would choose to drastically change their localtion after living someplace for 20 or 30 years - why the hell not? When you get to 60 you realize you don't have forever to do and experience all of the things you want. Sure, some people (my sister, cousins, for example) move 5 miles from where they grew up and remain there their entire lives. And they are happy, and I am happy for them. But what about people like me who want to experience as much of the world as they can and don't equate their happiness to proximity to family? That's why they invented airplanes, duh!

I'm about to embark on my third post retirement move in less than three years. December, 2014 my husband and I moved from Fort Lauderdale, Florida to Portland, Oregon. We had both spent over 25 years in Florida. I love the ocean. I hate the heat. Ditto the crowds, traffic, crime. Also, climate change. It's real, kiddos. So when we retired, we thought carefully about where we wanted to go. What's that quote? "We make plans and God laughs." The traumatic brain injury my husband sustained 6 weeks before our move ultimately forced us to move to a smaller, quieter place in Oregon, after a year in Portland. We landed in Jacksonville, in the heart of the southern Oregon wine country. That was move number two.

Now I'm about to relocate to the Oregon coast. Why, you ask? Because I can. I miss being close to the ocean. I'm not fond of the weather extremes in the valley. My husband will hopefully be joining me there after he finishes this round of treatment. If that happens, it will be lovely. If it doesnt, we will still be ok.

Moral of the story: Take risks! And do what makes you happy.
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Old 08-08-2017, 10:02 PM
 
Location: Idaho
4,621 posts, read 4,458,547 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marcandme View Post
Just wondering where those of you moved to at retirement...
From SoCal to North Idaho. Do not expect to "snowbird". Still cross-country ski and snowshoe. Looking to purchase a fat bike this winter. And on those days when it is questionable to venture outside, I'll be working on my French and Italian.
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Old 08-09-2017, 04:40 PM
 
41 posts, read 23,662 times
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Long time lurker here and very occasional poster. I enjoy reading about everyone's choices....but:

Question......why won't people in these retirement threads say where they live? I don't mean nitty gritty specifics, but at least the area and state....southern California, northwest Kansas, etc.

It's very frustrating to read descriptions of places and how much people enjoy their retirement locations but won't say where. Some things might strike a chord with people......we live in a coastal community with great tennis, or we have lovely mountain views and mild winters......and people might be interested in investigating the area. It would really be helpful to those of us trying to figure out this next chapter. And actually, if the town/area is large enough why not just say.....Knoxville, TN, Sarasota, Fl.

As for me, we live in the DC area. I retired two years ago and my husband will retire at the end of the year. The last five years or so we have visited places with an eye towards retirement but nothing has totally grabbed us yet, although there are some places we want to check out again. A lower cost of living is a plus and we want less congestion and an over 55 community for the social and activities aspects, We have relatives and friends in Florida and will spend time checking out all the coastal areas but I can't stand the summer humidity in DC so not sure I'll stand Florida either but I'd love to live near the beach. Sometimes I think we should head north instead of south but not sure about cold winters anymore either, although I realize there's no perfect place. So much to consider.
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Old 08-09-2017, 05:52 PM
 
Location: Straddling two worlds
2,517 posts, read 799,044 times
Reputation: 1748
Quote:
Originally Posted by Celeste16 View Post
Long time lurker here and very occasional poster. I enjoy reading about everyone's choices....but:

Question......why won't people in these retirement threads say where they live? I don't mean nitty gritty specifics, but at least the area and state....southern California, northwest Kansas, etc.

It's very frustrating to read descriptions of places and how much people enjoy their retirement locations but won't say where. Some things might strike a chord with people......we live in a coastal community with great tennis, or we have lovely mountain views and mild winters......and people might be interested in investigating the area. It would really be helpful to those of us trying to figure out this next chapter. And actually, if the town/area is large enough why not just say.....Knoxville, TN, Sarasota, Fl.

As for me, we live in the DC area. I retired two years ago and my husband will retire at the end of the year. The last five years or so we have visited places with an eye towards retirement but nothing has totally grabbed us yet, although there are some places we want to check out again. A lower cost of living is a plus and we want less congestion and an over 55 community for the social and activities aspects, We have relatives and friends in Florida and will spend time checking out all the coastal areas but I can't stand the summer humidity in DC so not sure I'll stand Florida either but I'd love to live near the beach. Sometimes I think we should head north instead of south but not sure about cold winters anymore either, although I realize there's no perfect place. So much to consider.
I hear your frustration. Currently live in San Francisco Bay Area which I can't wait to leave for a variety of reasons but finances (or lack thereof) will force me to leave even if I didn't want to, when I retire. Originally from New York but moving to Philadelphia which is financially more feasible but still only a 90 minute train ride away.
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Old 08-09-2017, 09:10 PM
 
Location: Floyd Co, VA
3,415 posts, read 5,131,103 times
Reputation: 7231
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
One thing that I've never understood is why people want to make often substantial life changes going into retirement or old age when they've lived certain ways for many years.

If you've lived somewhere for twenty or thirty years, you probably don't hate it or you would have done something about it before then. If you truly hated and gutted it out for the majority of your life, for whatever reason, that's on your fault.

I've seen lots of posts on the boards from people who have little knowledge or familiarity who are wanting to move to some backwater rural area in the state. They're often from the usual urban area suspects - NYC, Boston, CA, etc. These people are jerking themselves out of a lifestyle they've presumably become comfortable with, plopping themselves into a completely different culture and lifestyle. Many of these moves end in abject failure.
I grew up on Long Island, then moved to Oakland, CA in 1973, when I was 24. Got lucky with a great job with high wages, benefits and exceptionally large pension. I stayed with it for nearly 30 years. Took early retirement at 55 and moved cross country to Floyd, VA. It's a county with one traffic light, lots and lots of cows and about 15,000 people.

I've been here for over 11 years and am still very happy. I really enjoy rural living on 28 acres with a long stream crossing the property for the many old retrievers I've adopted over the years. I don't miss the bumper to bumper traffic, living one neighborhood over from the drug war zone, etc. I do still miss Chinese food but I manage to have some now and again.

Change can be wonderful if you know what you are going in to and I did.
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