U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-05-2017, 08:05 AM
 
3,457 posts, read 2,342,134 times
Reputation: 7004

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by catsy girl View Post
I lived for over 50 years in Maryland, and moved over 11 years ago to Delaware- mid-state, not Sussex county. I moved for totally personal reasons, but found that the cost of living here is much less than Md. , treatment of pensions, soc. sec. is more lenient, real estate taxes are unbelievably lower, and the services- at least where I am are not compromised because of it. The cost of homes, at least south of Middletown (excluding beach areas ) are very reasonable. As far as health care, I use Christiana Health Care, and find the quality of care, services offered, professionalism, are comparable to services in a much larger metropolitan area. However, I don't think the hospitals in Kent and Sussex counties ( Bay Health and Beebe ) are in the same league.


As far as chicken farms, that's not a problem or consideration in mid or northern Delaware. I don't know about Kent and Sussex counties.


Another plus is the proximity to larger metropolitan areas- Phil. and Balto. -when more complex health care,procedures are needed. Recently the S.O. had an outpatient procedure done at a hospital in Phil. Went up in the morning, discharged by 1pm, and home by 3.




Certainly a very personal decision- just some thoughts..


Catsy
We, too, are looking closely at DE, for all the reasons you mention. Especially the lower property taxes! (Hey, I'm from NJ. Say no more.) One thing that puts my husband (especially) off regarding DE is the fact that the vast majority of real estate ads are for homes with an HOA. And HOA is a deal-breaker for him. But I'm sure it's possible to find a home that is not in an HOA.

Even if we do move to DE, we would still consider spending winters elsewhere. The older we get, the more we hate winter. I won't go into a rant here, but dear heavens, we hate it. So there's that.

We'll keep thinking and reading good threads like this one, as I am not close to retirement age yet. My sis is moving to SC, so we'll have the opportunity to visit "down South" and see what life is like there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-05-2017, 08:30 AM
 
1,316 posts, read 1,738,864 times
Reputation: 1696
One year ago this October we moved 800 miles from the place we had been for most of our lives - central TX. Property taxes there were crazy high and climbing. For us, it was mostly a financial decision. We love the mountains and I have family in Colorado where we moved to. Also, I could no longer tolerate the long Texas summer heat. And...we wanted to have an adventure. Sell all the stuff and try something new while we still could.

Lots of adjustments but I feel like leaving our comfortable rut has been a tremendous opportunity for growth and adventure. The weather is amazing. I love learning all the new flora and fauna and having more than two seasons. I love seeing the mountains in our vista everyday. No more flatness. The culture here is less "refined" than the city we moved from, i.e. more blue collar. And the pot culture is definitely something we didn't take into account. Still adjusting to everything but it's fun to discover new things about another place. We do get homesick but it is fading as time passes.

Left behind one grown child who was exceedingly busy with her own career. I always found it odd that retirees follow their grown kids around but that's just me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-05-2017, 08:43 AM
 
12,784 posts, read 14,120,124 times
Reputation: 34992
Quote:
Originally Posted by eliza61nyc View Post
.....every single person I know that relocated far from the place they spent the last 40 years ended up back within 2 years for various reasons. mainly folks who moved to Florida or Arizona and then hated it when they got there.
I moved to NYC in 1959, spent just over forty years there.

Quote:
So if you have relocated, a few questions.

How far from your original home did you move?
Across the Atlantic to Western Europe in January 2000....2,500/3,000 miles, I guess.

Quote:
What was your biggest adjustment?
To stop being thrilled to friggin' pieces every single day and start leading something like a "normal" life.

Quote:
If you have kids/grandkids do you see them often?
None. But I would be the ol' grandpa, so I would expect them to knock themselves out to visit me....I've been there!

Last edited by volosong; 08-05-2017 at 02:39 PM.. Reason: fixed open quote hypertag
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-05-2017, 11:54 AM
 
29,829 posts, read 34,918,975 times
Reputation: 11752
Quote:
Originally Posted by catsy girl View Post
I lived for over 50 years in Maryland, and moved over 11 years ago to Delaware- mid-state, not Sussex county. I moved for totally personal reasons, but found that the cost of living here is much less than Md. , treatment of pensions, soc. sec. is more lenient, real estate taxes are unbelievably lower, and the services- at least where I am are not compromised because of it. The cost of homes, at least south of Middletown (excluding beach areas ) are very reasonable. As far as health care, I use Christiana Health Care, and find the quality of care, services offered, professionalism, are comparable to services in a much larger metropolitan area. However, I don't think the hospitals in Kent and Sussex counties ( Bay Health and Beebe ) are in the same league.


As far as chicken farms, that's not a problem or consideration in mid or northern Delaware. I don't know about Kent and Sussex counties.


Another plus is the proximity to larger metropolitan areas- Phil. and Balto. -when more complex health care,procedures are needed. Recently the S.O. had an outpatient procedure done at a hospital in Phil. Went up in the morning, discharged by 1pm, and home by 3.




Certainly a very personal decision- just some thoughts..


Catsy
I know many who did what you did and love it also.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-05-2017, 12:21 PM
 
Location: NE Mississippi
13,721 posts, read 8,617,819 times
Reputation: 19981
Quote:
Originally Posted by alpineprince View Post
Moved 3500 mi away, out of range of Kim Jung-Un's missiles.
Kids are down the hallway.
Had to adjust to bieng treated like a King and getting the biggest piece of chicken as well as waking up to a beautiful young wife every morning.
I need a lot of things. But a "young wife" is not among them.

We retired in place.
But we own 3 homes here in town (2 town homes in one building) and are making plans to downsize into one of them when we want to.
It's a good plan according to our accountant. Our real estate taxes would go to zero because of local tax breaks.
We'll probably never leave the area.
There are relatives I like and relatives I don't. I wish some of them would move farther away!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-05-2017, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Arizona
5,977 posts, read 5,326,543 times
Reputation: 18065
Quote:
Originally Posted by eliza61nyc View Post
So from another question I recently asked, it seems that relocating to a lower cost of living during retirement seems to be a very popular option. I admit that for me it's not an option for 2 reasons, primarily family and loved ones and two, from my experience, every single person I know that relocated far from the place they spent the last 40 years ended up back within 2 years for various reasons. mainly folks who moved to Florida or Arizona and then hated it when they got there.

So if you have relocated, a few questions.

How far from your original home did you move?
What was your biggest adjustment?
If you have kids/grandkids do you see them often?
Moved 2100 miles.

All adjustments were positive.

No kids I'm aware of.

I only know a handful of people that moved back. Usually because of their health or a family members health. I don't know anyone that moved because they didn't like it. The ones I know really hated to leave.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-05-2017, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Arizona
5,977 posts, read 5,326,543 times
Reputation: 18065
Quote:
Originally Posted by jghorton View Post
The subject of moving when one retires comes-up frequently on this forum. It always strikes me as odd that people are motivated to uproot their lives to get away from where they live (or to where they want to live) after they retire, yet, do nothing about it for decades before retirement.

I suppose employment and family considerations come into play. However, if one really desires to live elsewhere (ie; get out of the snow and live somewhere warm), it seems sad that they spend so much of their lives doing something else. Also, it's a lot more difficult to get re-established elsewhere at retirement age.
You will see many posts on CD from people that never kept a job long enough for a pension. That is why most people stay in one area.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-05-2017, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Arizona
5,977 posts, read 5,326,543 times
Reputation: 18065
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueherons View Post

It seems kind of dumb to me to move somewhere totally alien to you when you retire and not already have roots there.
In the right places it is easy to meet people. Why would roots be needed?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-05-2017, 02:49 PM
JRR
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
3,689 posts, read 2,235,454 times
Reputation: 5245
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueherons View Post
We relocated to our retirement city about ten years before we will retire.

We also moved to a place were we already had friends so there would be little to no adjustment period.

It seems kind of dumb to me to move somewhere totally alien to you when you retire and not already have roots there.

Almost 700 miles I believe.
Not everybody is the same. Our "adjustment period" has been nil (other than the Central Time thing). As for our new home area being "totally alien", no feeling at all of that; we felt right at home from the get-go. So if what we did is dumb, feel free to call us dumb and happy!!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-05-2017, 03:12 PM
 
7 posts, read 3,314 times
Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by alpineprince View Post
Moved 3500 mi away, out of range of Kim Jung-Un's missiles.
Ha Ha, that is a unique retirement criteria for sure. Not a bad one mind you. Though I do wonder how long "out of range" is going to be true.

I, personally, intend to seek out a location near a THAAD battery.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top