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Old 08-12-2017, 09:59 PM
 
Location: LA, CA/ In This Time and Place
5,433 posts, read 3,506,314 times
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I missed out as I was born in Dec 1986.
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Old 08-12-2017, 10:03 PM
 
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Event had coverage on Detroit radio. Asked my parents if I could attend, to hang with a classmates older brother and his friends (they needed passengers to share gas costs). Answer was "no." The folks hated his VW van and their long hair. Didn't need to get a substitute for my newspaper route so late summer life rolled on, routine as it was, for this 15 year old.

When the Woodstock crew returned they grooved over the act no one had heard of: Santana. Saying the drummer had an unreal as long solo had me buy their album when it was released. A lot of area people confused the Who with the Guess Who who received a ton of airplay on radio 800, The Big 8.
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Old 08-12-2017, 10:29 PM
 
Location: Straddling two worlds
2,531 posts, read 803,938 times
Reputation: 1776
I had the date wrong for the blackout. This is what I was referring to about John Lindsay:

"On April 4, 1968, a nation wounded both by the Vietnam War and the divisions it had created, and by outbreaks of civil unrest in its cities, faced the assassination of the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. Pent-up anger and frustration led to rioting, looting and arson that destroyed vast swaths of neighborhoods in Washington, DC, Chicago, Kansas City, Newark and Baltimore. In New York City, it was a different story. Because Mayor John Lindsay and his staff had built relationships with the African-American community, Lindsay was able to travel to Harlem after the assassination and help calm an angry crowd, greatly limiting the damage done."
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Old 08-13-2017, 06:36 AM
 
Location: North Oakland
9,155 posts, read 8,669,030 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FiveLoaves View Post
On Saturday August 16 1969, Led Zeppelin was playing 2 shows at the Asbury Park Convention Hall, a wonderful Art Deco Building sitting on the Oceanfront. You may recall that Led Zep's manager was Peter Grant, as big a con artist as show business has ever spawned. He refused to let his charges play Woodstock without TOP BILLING.

So, we few, we happy few, we Band of Brothers we all drove the 15 miles to Asbury Park and saw Led Zep in all their glory. They brought all of their stage gear - stacks of Marshall Amps, and the full Drum Kit. All in a venue about the size of a High School Gym. To say that the Roof rafters were lifted several feet is not an exaggeration.

I still have the ticket for the early show, last time I looked at it the Price was $5.50, that's not a typo. We stayed on the Beach to listen to the Late Show long into that evening.

Oh, and Joe Cocker was the Opening Act, he caught a helicopter on the beach and flew directly to Woodstock.

Convention Hall - August 16, 1969 / Asbury Park | Led Zeppelin Official Website
I was at that concert, too. A friend had brought up the possibility of going to Woodstock, but I immediately bowed out. No way I was going to a concert that involved camping out for two nights, especially since we didn't have tickets for it, and we did have them for Led Zeppelin. At that time, I would rather have seen Zeppelin than anyone on the Woodstock roster except maybe CSN (I definitely liked Led Zep more than the Who, Jimi Hendrix, or Joni Mitchell). I had seen the Byrds, the Airplane, the Doors, the Who, and the Beach Boys at Asbury Park during earlier summers. I did not want to miss Led Zeppelin.

Thanks for your post. I had forgotten that the two events coincided.

Last edited by jay5835; 08-13-2017 at 06:50 AM..
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Old 08-13-2017, 06:42 AM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,841 posts, read 18,861,423 times
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The Great Northeast Blackout - Nov 09, 1965 - HISTORY.com
This is the only blackout that I remember and it was scary. Lights went out at about 5:15, flicked then total blackness. looked out the window and darkness all down the street. Got into the car, drove, the only light was from the headlights, the only news was scant, from the car radio. We thought we were being invaded by aliens.

Everything closed down due to no electricity. We could't cook or eat out, just cold sandwiches that they were handing out. Power finally came on the next morning and we learned that it had affected a really large area of the power grid. Back then, unlike today, we weren't used to weird things like this.
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Old 08-13-2017, 06:55 AM
 
Location: DFW - Coppell / Las Colinas
32,022 posts, read 36,645,712 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jay5835 View Post
I was at that concert, too. A friend had brought up the possibility of going to Woodstock, but I immediately bowed out. No way I was going to a concert that involved camping out for two nights, especially since we didn't have tickets for it, and we did have them for Led Zeppelin. At that time, I would rather have seen Zeppelin than anyone on the Woodstock roster except maybe CSN (I definitely liked Led Zep more than the Who, Jimi Hendrix, or Joni Mitchell). I had seen the Byrds, the Airplane, the Doors, and the Beach Boys at Asbury Park during earlier summers. I did not want to miss Led Zeppelin.

From what I have read, it was the one big regret LZ had was not agreeing to play Woodstock.

"We were asked to do Woodstock and Atlantic were very keen, and so was our US promoter, Frank Barcelona. I said no because at Woodstock we'd have just been another band on the bill." -- Peter Grant
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Old 08-13-2017, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Charleston, SC
1,362 posts, read 767,627 times
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If you Jersey Boys remember, the local Promoter Moe Septee brought a lot of top talent to Asbury Park in those days. I recall seeing the Doors and Ten Years After in that Venue. I don't know if Moe made any money on the shows after renting the place and paying security.....But I thank Moe to this day for bringing those acts to the Shore.

It's not unreasonable to think that Moe Septee created an environment where Local Artists could thrive in small clubs like The Student Prince and The Stone Pony.
Without the Upstage Club.....there might be no Bruce Springsteen.
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Old 08-13-2017, 10:43 AM
 
Location: Kalamalka Lake, B.C.
3,044 posts, read 4,016,359 times
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I thought it was earlier than that.

Didn't man land on the moon that year using nothing but mirrors and some (natural) chemical of some kind??
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Old 08-13-2017, 11:28 AM
 
13,044 posts, read 15,397,378 times
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I was only 12 years old. I kind of wish I had been at least 5 or 6 years older and able to experience it.
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Old 08-13-2017, 11:36 AM
 
Location: New York Area
15,909 posts, read 6,264,006 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hannah5555 View Post
I had the date wrong for the blackout. This is what I was referring to about John Lindsay:

"On April 4, 1968, a nation wounded both by the Vietnam War and the divisions it had created, and by outbreaks of civil unrest in its cities, faced the assassination of the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. Pent-up anger and frustration led to rioting, looting and arson that destroyed vast swaths of neighborhoods in Washington, DC, Chicago, Kansas City, Newark and Baltimore. In New York City, it was a different story. Because Mayor John Lindsay and his staff had built relationships with the African-American community, Lindsay was able to travel to Harlem after the assassination and help calm an angry crowd, greatly limiting the damage done."
The King Assassination is about the only thing Lindsay handled well. His handling of the Forest Hills housing was a racial conflict in which his role was highly divisive and unfortunately defined his terms and career, along with the February 9, 1969 snowstorm and the post-mayoral financial crisis.
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