U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 08-27-2017, 03:53 PM
 
11,142 posts, read 8,551,921 times
Reputation: 28142

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Giesela View Post
Interesting but there are only 2 in the entire state of Michigan.
Two is better than none. As people become aware, maybe there will be more. For some things, maybe meetings could be done remotely. There is always a solution.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-27-2017, 04:34 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque NM
1,661 posts, read 1,527,824 times
Reputation: 3650
Quote:
Originally Posted by Giesela View Post
Interesting but there are only 2 in the entire state of Michigan.
I googled "geriatric care manager Michigan" and many hits came up. Looked at one website only but care managers were in Grand Rapids, Ann Arbor, and numerous Detroit suburbs. I've googled the same for New Mexico and found less listings and only in a few cities and larger towns. However, we are in our early 60's and by the time we hit our early 80's there should be more resources for single seniors who can afford these services. For poor seniors it will continue to be a struggle although more government resources seem to be available than ten years ago (e.g., VA program that helps subsidize home care).

And if you want to live in a more isolated area or small town, care managers may not be available now or in the future. But that should be part of your planning process - live where you want while you are still healthy and mobile but plan to relocate at some point for medical and transportation services. Or stay in that urban area forever if that is your desire or if that keeps you in your comfort zone.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-28-2017, 09:25 AM
 
7,802 posts, read 4,395,350 times
Reputation: 11604
Let me just say...you'd better be a millionaire (literally) if you plan to pay someone to care for you 24/7 or even a "geriatric care manager" for years and years. Considering that 75% of Americans don't have ANY savings, guess that will fall to the taxpayers via Medicaid nursing home payments; when I can no longer care for myself, I'll be ready to go.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-28-2017, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,613 posts, read 17,589,896 times
Reputation: 27693
Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
Let me just say...you'd better be a millionaire (literally) if you plan to pay someone to care for you 24/7 or even a "geriatric care manager" for years and years. Considering that 75% of Americans don't have ANY savings, guess that will fall to the taxpayers via Medicaid nursing home payments; when I can no longer care for myself, I'll be ready to go.
Ultimately I think we're heading to something for the elderly that is a lot more horrible than many of us anticipate.

Only one person in my family is well off. Both sets of grandparents have paid for, smaller homes, and a reasonable amount but not a ton in the way of assets (that I know of).

We've had several family members, mostly Silents, end up in nursing homes for many years. Medicaid ends up getting a lien on the home. After they exhaust their own funds, we the people end up paying for the care - in my relatives' case, often for at least two years.

Historically, we've had more workers paying into the system than seniors drawing off of it. What happens when we go in reverse?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-28-2017, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Central IL
15,253 posts, read 8,548,360 times
Reputation: 35677
Quote:
Originally Posted by Giesela View Post
My mother took care of my father who had Parkinsons till he passed at...88? So she was 79. He could shuffle around if you were patient till the last few years when he was mostly in a wheelchair. He could still assist a little with standing a little thouh till just before the end and that made a lot of difference. I would try to help on visits like getting him in and out of the car to a Dr. appt but she would wave me off. It was very difficult to watch but she had a practiced approach, jam a knee here, lift that. She figured things out and got it done. Very very tough early life. Americans have gotten soft. Everyone trying to figure out how to get the government to pay for nursing home care.

Agree with your comments
That's great for your mother to take that on. I don't know the current situation but who is or was planning to take care of your mother? Women do most of the caregiving, worldwide but there's not always someone around for them when they need it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-28-2017, 10:33 AM
 
5,466 posts, read 2,352,417 times
Reputation: 15111
Quote:
Originally Posted by giesela View Post
my mother took care of my father who had parkinsons till he passed at...88? So she was 79. He could shuffle around if you were patient till the last few years when he was mostly in a wheelchair. He could still assist a little with standing a little thouh till just before the end and that made a lot of difference. I would try to help on visits like getting him in and out of the car to a dr. Appt but she would wave me off. It was very difficult to watch but she had a practiced approach, jam a knee here, lift that. She figured things out and got it done. Very very tough early life. Americans have gotten soft. Everyone trying to figure out how to get the government to pay for nursing home care.

Agree with your comments
+1.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-28-2017, 10:52 AM
 
Location: South Florida
195 posts, read 106,484 times
Reputation: 1158
Quote:
Originally Posted by Giesela View Post
My mother took care of my father who had Parkinsons till he passed at...88? So she was 79. He could shuffle around if you were patient till the last few years when he was mostly in a wheelchair. He could still assist a little with standing a little thouh till just before the end and that made a lot of difference. I would try to help on visits like getting him in and out of the car to a Dr. appt but she would wave me off. It was very difficult to watch but she had a practiced approach, jam a knee here, lift that. She figured things out and got it done. Very very tough early life. Americans have gotten soft. Everyone trying to figure out how to get the government to pay for nursing home care.

Agree with your comments
That sounds like it might be me in 20 years. Right now I am 59 and well-versed with the "jam a knee here, lift that" approach to doing everything myself when it comes to taking care of my husband with Parkinsons and dementia. I can't leave him home alone so I developed a way to take him grocery shopping. I have him sit in his wheelchair behind the shopping cart with his feet up on the bottom rack and hands on the handle. Then I walk in front of the cart pulling it and him along. When he is in a good mood I take the corners fast and he feels like he is water-skiing!

I plan on taking care of him myself until he dies. Because my son died before me I will eventually become an "elder orphan" but I am young still and have plenty of time to come up with a plan. It is always interesting for me to read about others ideas on how to handle situations. I feel like I am doing my due diligence by listening to what others have to say.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-28-2017, 11:24 AM
 
11,142 posts, read 8,551,921 times
Reputation: 28142
Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
Let me just say...you'd better be a millionaire (literally) if you plan to pay someone to care for you 24/7 or even a "geriatric care manager" for years and years. Considering that 75% of Americans don't have ANY savings, guess that will fall to the taxpayers via Medicaid nursing home payments; when I can no longer care for myself, I'll be ready to go.
The geriatric care manager visits were like $150 and they are only needed once a month or quarter. That's affordable. They just help set up or monitor your care.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-29-2017, 03:37 AM
 
Location: A State of Mind
5,234 posts, read 2,087,538 times
Reputation: 4846
Well, I for one, am scared. I take care of myself, but due to things not having gone as they do for some, I am concerned for the future, with few to rely upon. I still need to find an appropriate, lower-rent housing situation, which I have mentioned. (The reason I would even leave here is due to the rent increases, which is still lower than regular rent). Down the road, I will not be able to afford elder-care or a retirement home. I worry about managing on my own, later on.

I have a bad knee, resulting in Osteoarthritis in later years after having injured it many years ago when quite young. I would get Cortisone injections occasionally which help, and my Dr. recommended surgery, but what concerned me would be three days in the hospital and what all would be is needed while recovering at home without consistent help. I have a pet and the Dr. said "Well, surely you could board her". (Also, the surgery would not be entirely covered). I have since found that taking supplements has helped some, but am still limited. (I am not taking walks around the neighborhood or climbing stairs).

I use Original Medicare which is great, seeing specialists and choose those who accept "assignment", so ones who do this are paid in full by Medicare. I was trying to find a Therapist to discuss issues with (or maybe getting into a support group), but those I have contacted so far said they still charge a fee, besides. Though it's not much, it would add up and I just cannot have extra costs.

I guess what gets to me is the unsettledness and knowing that change is inevitable, wanting to feel settled and secure, not that I am not grateful for all I have. I just wonder what it feels like to not have to think about financial concerns so much, though I know one could still have health concerns, etc.

I have an old friend in another state who has her own home, but is not so well-off. She visits a Senior Center where she plays games with other women, widows who are doing fine financially, those who didn't really work. It seems ones such as these are able to relax.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-29-2017, 06:38 PM
 
Location: Central NY
4,680 posts, read 3,250,875 times
Reputation: 11982
In2itive_1: I can only address the issue you have with your knee and possible need for surgery.

I have no one for support, either. It has been this way for many years. Every challenge that came my way (and there have been several) I kept telling myself that I could do it. I had to do it. No one to help me through it.

I needed knee replacement surgery 2.5 years ago. I was in hospital 3 days and then went to 10-12 day rehab. I knew it was going to hurt, I was kind of used to pain from pre-surgery life. So I knew I had to give myself an attitude change and I did. I didn't want to be disabled or handicapped. I made myself do all the exercises my P.T. gave me and she was a pusher..... she wouldn't let me off the hook.

Then I had to go home. Lived by myself (still do) with a cat to take care of. Before the surgery, I brought in plenty of easy fix food, frozen dinners (don't much like them now), soup, cereal, etc. Lots of cat food, etc. I did have a therapy nurse come to my apartment for two weeks, 3 days each to measure my progress, give suggestions, put me through my paces.

It does take a lot of determination on our part. We have to want it bad, and I did. I had visualized me moving to NC mountain area, which kept me going, that mental picture. Since then, I'm not moving. Don't have that desire anymore. But I am so glad I worked so hard to get through it.

Don't give up, don't give in to fear. FEAR = false evidence appearing real.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top