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View Poll Results: At what age did you start receiving social security?
Before 62 13 8.84%
62 63 42.86%
63 6 4.08%
64 7 4.76%
65 11 7.48%
66 22 14.97%
67 4 2.72%
68 4 2.72%
69 1 0.68%
70 13 8.84%
After 70 3 2.04%
Voters: 147. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-22-2017, 06:35 PM
 
Location: Grove City, Ohio
10,129 posts, read 12,378,690 times
Reputation: 13947

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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldsoldier1976 View Post
I am not 60 yet. But I did vote. The plan is to collect at 70 but I will revisit it each year I am eligible.
I will be 69 in a couple short months and if I filed in October, baring any increases, I would receive $2,843 but if I wait just one more year it will be approximately $3,040 or somewhere there about.

But to tell the truth I am ready now and going to work is becoming a real chore.

Work sucks but that extra $197 every month is exactly as if I had saved an additional $47,280 so I could withdraw $197 every month for 20 years. 66 was 3 years ago for me and every year I used the same rational "that's another $47k saved" just to get me through the process.

I am cutting back on work to about half time where I work 12 straight days on followed by 16 straight days off. So far I haven't had my pay cut but I did bring it up to the owner and so far it's still full pay. Wouldn't bother me a bit, it would only be fair, if I got a 40% cut which I would be happy with but.... how many people on earth ever attempted to negotiate a pay cut? I might be a first.

Most of my work is office type where I sit at a computer most of the day but 20% of my time is spent visiting construction sites that involves a lot of walking and sometimes negotiating obstacles. I got to watch my step it isn't like I was when I was 30 because a misstep today could cause me to fall and falls are bad.

Not nimble on my feet anymore and people here are starting to cover for me which means they are watching what I do that I don't try to do something I shouldn't.

I am really getting tired and I have a feeling I won't make it any farther than next April at which time I will just stop work and live on savings to 70.

Can't do it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
O.K., I'll take the bait. How can anyone collect Social Security "before age 62"?
I didn't mean to throw bait but doesn't a widow who is 60 entitled to some sort of social security? I could be wrong I suppose.
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Old 08-22-2017, 06:59 PM
 
Location: OH>IL>CO>CT
5,230 posts, read 8,392,545 times
Reputation: 7185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
O.K., I'll take the bait. How can anyone collect Social Security "before age 62"?
I was one of those who, unfortunately, was able to start Survivor's Benefits at age 60 upon the sudden death of my wife.
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Old 08-22-2017, 07:18 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,729,443 times
Reputation: 32304
Quote:
Originally Posted by reed303 View Post
I was one of those who, unfortunately, was able to start Survivor's Benefits at age 60 upon the sudden death of my wife.

I am so sorry for your loss, but you are very kind to answer my question with that information. Obviously, I had no idea that survivor's benefits could start earlier than age 60.


But now that I think about it, it makes sense. Back when Social Security came into existence in the late 1930's, there were limited employment opportunities for women, and if a woman became widowed young, say in her 30's (and especially if she had young children) she would probably have been destitute without that Social Security provision.


Yes, I know you are not a woman, and I know things have changed, but I was just trying to reason through the probable justification, or thinking, for the provision as it was originally included in the legislation.
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Old 08-22-2017, 07:28 PM
 
6,306 posts, read 5,049,308 times
Reputation: 12810
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I am so sorry for your loss, but you are very kind to answer my question with that information. Obviously, I had no idea that survivor's benefits could start earlier than age 60.


But now that I think about it, it makes sense. Back when Social Security came into existence in the late 1930's, there were limited employment opportunities for women, and if a woman became widowed young, say in her 30's (and especially if she had young children) she would probably have been destitute without that Social Security provision.


Yes, I know you are not a woman, and I know things have changed, but I was just trying to reason through the probable justification, or thinking, for the provision as it was originally included in the legislation.
I received Social security via my father when I was in high school and college. I think they cut it off at 18 now.
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Old 08-22-2017, 07:41 PM
 
Location: Grove City, Ohio
10,129 posts, read 12,378,690 times
Reputation: 13947
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clemencia53 View Post
I received Social security via my father when I was in high school and college. I think they cut it off at 18 now.
My dad died when I was 2 years and 9 months old.

I collected, as did my siblings, as well I remember it being $33/month for each amounting to $99/month but this was the late 50's and early 60's.

According to this inflation calculator $99.00 in 1961 would be equivalent to $810.00 today.

So yeah, I suppose you could say I started collecting at 2.

Social security is a whole lot more than just old age insurance.
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Old 08-22-2017, 07:52 PM
 
41 posts, read 23,686 times
Reputation: 81
I retired at 62 but did not take SS since DH is still working. We will both be 66 next year. DH is retiring at the end of the year. I will file at 66 and he will wait until 70. I get a pension that covers about 20% of our monthly expenses. We will use savings and/or the 401k to supplement for the next 4-5 years until his SS kicks in.
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Old 08-22-2017, 08:22 PM
Status: "Re-edit status" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Was Midvalley Oregon; Now Eastside Seattle area
4,148 posts, read 1,890,030 times
Reputation: 3167
2011 @64
2012 @62
Age alone does not account for taking SS.
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Old 08-22-2017, 09:10 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,550 posts, read 3,656,219 times
Reputation: 12307
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
O.K., I'll take the bait. How can anyone collect Social Security "before age 62"?
Surviving spouse can collect at 60.
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Old 08-22-2017, 09:34 PM
 
Location: Eagle, ID
159 posts, read 112,164 times
Reputation: 299
Hubby retired at 60 and started SS at 62 so we could qualify for ACA tax credits and maximum cost sharing subsidies for healthcare. I retired from full-time at 50 and did consulting so I could enjoy being a new Grandma. I will not claim SS until my FRA at 66+. And we both will have pensions at 65.

Fortunately we planned well and can supplement income with our cash reserves. No regrets!
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Old 08-22-2017, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Its easy to be a perfectionist when someone else is doing all the work.
2,232 posts, read 5,461,271 times
Reputation: 4088
I took spousal at 66. I will be taking mine at 70.
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