U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: At what age did you start receiving social security?
Before 62 13 8.84%
62 63 42.86%
63 6 4.08%
64 7 4.76%
65 11 7.48%
66 22 14.97%
67 4 2.72%
68 4 2.72%
69 1 0.68%
70 13 8.84%
After 70 3 2.04%
Voters: 147. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-23-2017, 04:48 PM
 
948 posts, read 440,951 times
Reputation: 1561

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Clemencia53 View Post
I received Social security via my father when I was in high school and college. I think they cut it off at 18 now.
Also received survivors benefits after my dad died in a car accident when I was 11. Got a monthly social security check up until June of 2013 (a month after I graduated high school, turned 18 in January).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-23-2017, 06:27 PM
 
Location: Its easy to be a perfectionist when someone else is doing all the work.
2,232 posts, read 5,462,808 times
Reputation: 4088
I just wanted to point out that even with the new law there are still a limited few of us who can still take spousal benefits and restrict our own benefits till age 70.









https://www.ssa.gov/planners/retire/deemedfaq.html

FAQ #4 Can I restrict my application for benefits and apply only for spouse’s benefits and delay filing for my own retirement benefit in order to earn delayed retirement credits?

If you turn 62 before January 2, 2016, deemed filing rules will not apply if you file at full retirement age or later. This means that you may file for either your spouse’s benefit or your retirement benefit without being required or “deemed” to file for the other. In your case, you may also restrict your application to apply only for spouse’s benefits and delay filing for your own retirement in order to earn delayed retirement credits. However, if you turn age 62 on or after January 2, 2016, you are required or “deemed” to file for both your own retirement and for any benefits you are due as a spouse, no matter what age you are.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-23-2017, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Columbia SC
8,965 posts, read 7,741,639 times
Reputation: 12169
Wife and I both started collecting at age 62. She died at age 75 and I am presently 75. No regrets. As I aged and began to think about the future, I believed in give me the money now and I will take care of the future myself. Worked for me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2017, 01:52 AM
 
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
10,515 posts, read 8,762,464 times
Reputation: 12198
At my max retirement age, 67. I worked until I was 73.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2017, 03:16 AM
 
71,573 posts, read 71,730,589 times
Reputation: 49168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cecilia_Rose View Post
I just wanted to point out that even with the new law there are still a limited few of us who can still take spousal benefits and restrict our own benefits till age 70.









https://www.ssa.gov/planners/retire/deemedfaq.html

FAQ #4 Can I restrict my application for benefits and apply only for spouse’s benefits and delay filing for my own retirement benefit in order to earn delayed retirement credits?

If you turn 62 before January 2, 2016, deemed filing rules will not apply if you file at full retirement age or later. This means that you may file for either your spouse’s benefit or your retirement benefit without being required or “deemed” to file for the other. In your case, you may also restrict your application to apply only for spouse’s benefits and delay filing for your own retirement in order to earn delayed retirement credits. However, if you turn age 62 on or after January 2, 2016, you are required or “deemed” to file for both your own retirement and for any benefits you are due as a spouse, no matter what age you are.
here is a nice summary

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2017, 04:59 AM
 
Location: Mount Airy, Maryland
10,461 posts, read 5,928,514 times
Reputation: 16156
Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
nooooooooooooo SURVIVOR BENEFITS ARE 60 NOT RETIREMENT BENEFITS .

she can only file at 62 and she only gets her own benefit .

when you file if 1/2 your full is more than her full she will get an adjusted difference added to hers .
Let me clarify, I was talking about survivor benefits as that was what was being discussed as the way you can receive at 60. So that's the question, I get hit by a bus today. Can my wife file and collect on my earnings? And what will be the reductions from my FRA figure that she would normal get by waiting?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2017, 05:05 AM
 
71,573 posts, read 71,730,589 times
Reputation: 49168
it depends on her age when she takes survivor as well as if you filed early . there is a chart.

so as an example for every 1k in survivor benefit at her fra , she would get 862 .00 at age 60 if her fra was age 66 and you did not file early .

at age 60 she gets roughly your amount x .715 .. at 62 it is roughly your amount x .81 and so on until if she files at fra she gets what you got or your fra amount ,which ever is higher .
How Much Will You Get?
The actual monthly dollar amount you receive will depend on how much money (earnings that were subject to Social Security payroll taxes) your spouse or ex-spouse made over their lifetime. Each person’s Social Security statement provides an estimate of survivor’s benefits.

Below are some guidelines to use to help you estimate how much you may be eligible for as a survivor benefit.

Neither of You Had Started Benefits

If neither of you had started benefits yet, and you wait until your survivor full retirement age (likely your age 66 or 67) or older to apply for your widow/widower benefits, you will receive 100 percent of your deceased spouse’s basic benefit amount. It means if they were eligible to get $1,650 a month at their full retirement age, you would get $1,650 a month by waiting until your full retirement age to file.
Survivor’s benefits include the effect of delayed retirement credits. It means if a deceased spouse was already past age 66 or 67 and had not started taking Social Security (they can delay until their age 70), it may result in a higher survivor benefit for you than if they had filed earlier. You can get what the would have gotten at that later age.

Reductions to Benefits

You can apply for Social Security survivor benefits as early as age 60. If you file between age 60 and your survivor full retirement age, you will receive somewhere between 71 - 99% of your deceased spouse’s basic benefit amount. (The amount scales up for each month that you are closer to your full retirement age.)
If you collect a survivor benefit and you have not yet reached full retirement age, you can lose some of your benefits by working. It happens if your earnings are in excess of the earnings limit.
You or Your Spouse Had Started Benefits, or You Are Caring for a Young Child

Once you and your spouse are both receiving Social Security benefits, upon the death of your spouse, you will continue to receive the larger of your benefit - or your spouse’s - but not both.
If your spouse had started benefits, but you had not, you can choose to collect a survivor benefit now, then switch to your benefit at your age 70 if your benefit would be larger at that point.
At any age, if you are caring for a child younger than age 16, you will receive 75 percent of the deceased worker’s benefit amount.
Benefits for Ex-Spouses

If you are an ex-spouse but were married at least ten years you are eligible for the spousal survivor benefit - even if your ex-spouse remarried.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/advisor.../#2856885d382f

Last edited by mathjak107; 08-24-2017 at 06:28 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2017, 07:32 AM
 
Location: Mount Airy, Maryland
10,461 posts, read 5,928,514 times
Reputation: 16156
Thanks MJ. I'm 58 and can't file early. I was asking if my wife could file immediately at her age of 60 should I die today. It appears as if she can, at a reduced figure obviously. Like every other form of filing if she waits she is rewarded with larger payments. But it appears as if she can file as early as 60 if I die at 58 correct? And at 60 it would be approximately 71% of my FRA figure, higher as she delays.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2017, 07:38 AM
 
3,455 posts, read 2,328,622 times
Reputation: 6998
I have an occupation that I can continue to do for a long time, assuming I stay relatively healthy (by which I mean no terminal illness, or an illness that drastically limits my function). At this point, that is my plan, to continue to work. But it seems like I could start collecting benefits at FRA (66 and 8 months), continue to work, and Social Security would recalculate my benefit each year that I worked beyond FRA (but, I'm assuming, no increase in benefit after age 70). How does that sound for a strategy? (With gratitude to the posters who offer so much helpful information here.)

https://www.ssa.gov/planners/retire/whileworking.html
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2017, 07:38 AM
 
71,573 posts, read 71,730,589 times
Reputation: 49168
it would be 71% of your 62 benefit i believe . . it is pretty low . it says basic benefit pre fra not pia benefit .
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top