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Old 08-27-2017, 05:08 AM
 
14,113 posts, read 7,526,443 times
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Meh. I started taking daily baby aspirin in my late 40's. My father had vascular dementia from lots of mini-strokes. No thanks. There's really good data out there about aspirin and stroke mitigation. I want my brain to be 100% functional in my 80's.
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Old 08-27-2017, 05:16 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,791 posts, read 7,091,057 times
Reputation: 14379
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYgal1542 View Post
I have two that I use when I travel. One for prescription pills, the other for any supplements I may be taking.

I've made a decision that many of you might not agree with. I take a multiple vitamin every day. At one time I took a few others.... Vit. D, E, magnesium, etc. Then I decided to get the magnifying glass out and have a look at what the multiple vitamin has in it. That's when I stopped all the others. And my body does not seem to miss the extras. A medical person told me one time that anything we take that our body does not need comes out in our urine.
I think my husband does that, ie, uses one pill container for prescription drugs and another one or two for supplements.

I think you're spot on about checking what's in the multivitamins to see if these provide the minimum daily requirements for the vitamins you mention, as well as the trace elements and minerals people think they need lots of-it really isn't a case of "if some is good, more is better" for all of those. In fact, taking much more than one needs of those vitamins, minerals, etc. is in the best case scenario a waste of money as you mentioned the excesses will be excreted in the urine ( water soluble vitamins like Vit. C), or may be harmful if excesses are stored in the body ( like fat soluble vitamins like Vit. A).

There's a lot of information out there suggesting that many people tend to take too many supplements. I take a multivitamin too, but feel it's important to take the multivitamin blends that are formulated for specific groups of people, such as for me, the over age 50 women's vitamins. These, IMO, are more likely to contain the elements that specific group needs and in the quantity they need, but not what they
don't need. For example the over 50 women's vitamins don't contain iron, as most post-menopausal women don't need to supplement their dietary iron intake, and too much iron intake can be harmful.

https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/...ents/index.htm
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Old 08-27-2017, 06:24 AM
 
Location: Central NY
4,715 posts, read 3,282,145 times
Reputation: 12146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
I think my husband does that, ie, uses one pill container for prescription drugs and another one or two for supplements.

I think you're spot on about checking what's in the multivitamins to see if these provide the minimum daily requirements for the vitamins you mention, as well as the trace elements and minerals people think they need lots of-it really isn't a case of "if some is good, more is better" for all of those. In fact, taking much more than one needs of those vitamins, minerals, etc. is in the best case scenario a waste of money as you mentioned the excesses will be excreted in the urine ( water soluble vitamins like Vit. C), or may be harmful if excesses are stored in the body ( like fat soluble vitamins like Vit. A).

There's a lot of information out there suggesting that many people tend to take too many supplements. I take a multivitamin too, but feel it's important to take the multivitamin blends that are formulated for specific groups of people, such as for me, the over age 50 women's vitamins. These, IMO, are more likely to contain the elements that specific group needs and in the quantity they need, but not what they
don't need. For example the over 50 women's vitamins don't contain iron, as most post-menopausal women don't need to supplement their dietary iron intake, and too much iron intake can be harmful.

https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/...ents/index.htm

I only buy vitamins that do not have iron. Iron has caused me lots of problems for which I have needed to take a different kind of medicine.

Thank you for sharing your information.
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Old 08-27-2017, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
8,048 posts, read 5,933,984 times
Reputation: 9786
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYgal1542 View Post
<><>A medical person told me one time that anything we take that our body does not need comes out in our urine.
Well, not EVERYTHING.
Your "medical person" was probably talking about water soluble vitamins which will be eliminated if you overuse.
Fat soluble vitamins, OTOH, are not as readily passed through:
"Fat-soluble vitamins: A, D, E, and K are stored in the body for long periods of time,
and pose a greater risk for toxicity than water-soluble vitamins.
Beta carotene is an important antioxidant that the body converts to Vitamin A,
and it is found in a variety of fruits and vegetables." Colorado State University web site.

Your body can make some vitamins, but often not enough for optimal health.
For some interesting reading, search "fat soluble vitamins" and "isotonix"
Most pills yield only a part of the contents as they pass through you.
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Old 08-27-2017, 09:23 AM
 
15,151 posts, read 19,841,411 times
Reputation: 21356
I'm one of those who has to take a number of pills due to a health issue from 11 years ago. Instead of a 7-day pillbox, I use a sock-box, a wood box with inserts that's designed to hold socks.

With my labelmaker, I made little labels for each of the 3 compartments. One says "Morning", one says "Evening" and one says "Morning+Evening".

To remind myself whether or not I've taken the pills, I use a black binder clip -- I move it from the "Morning" compartment to the other compartment and back again, as appropriate.
Attached Thumbnails
Do you have one of those "Sunday-Saturday" pill containers?-pill-box.jpg  
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Old 08-27-2017, 09:31 AM
 
9,153 posts, read 7,250,143 times
Reputation: 13848
Quote:
Originally Posted by FeelinLow View Post
They're called ''medi-sets''. I use a small one for my vitamin, fish oil, garlique, and low dose aspirin. That's all I take. Handy each day.
Yes, they're not necessarily prescription pills. Mine are all OTC. Two for hot flashes, two for daily vitamins, one hair/skin, 3 fish oil, and a melatonin in the evening as a sleep aid.
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Old 08-27-2017, 10:14 AM
 
Location: Houston area
762 posts, read 814,500 times
Reputation: 1742
One thing is sure, as your grandparents and then parents age, you see what happens to their health a long time before you get there.
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Old 08-27-2017, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
8,048 posts, read 5,933,984 times
Reputation: 9786
Quote:
Originally Posted by TFW46 View Post
<>Instead of a 7-day pillbox, I use a sock-box, a wood box with inserts that's designed to hold socks.<>
Ingenious. Do you really need "child proof" lids? Your pharmacist can provide easy open lids if appropriate.
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Old 08-27-2017, 10:33 AM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,698 posts, read 23,748,789 times
Reputation: 35465
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crashj007 View Post
Ingenious. Do you really need "child proof" lids? Your pharmacist can provide easy open lids if appropriate.
I use those. Those safety caps are a nightmare for me. I even keep a few extra non-saftey caps on hand to switch off in case the pharmacist forgets and puts a safety cap on a refill or new prescription.
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Old 08-27-2017, 10:41 AM
 
15,151 posts, read 19,841,411 times
Reputation: 21356
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crashj007 View Post
Ingenious. Do you really need "child proof" lids? Your pharmacist can provide easy open lids if appropriate.

Thanks. I didnt know they were child-proof. They're very easy to open.
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