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Old 09-02-2017, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Washington state
5,440 posts, read 2,767,327 times
Reputation: 16373

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I'd love to go back to college just to have new things to learn. But it wouldn't be to find another job since I've already had so much success getting hired when I was 10 years younger (said with sarcasm).

I'll have to check into reduced rates for seniors. Although I doubt if they have that here and there's the added problem of where I live. I'm in subsidized housing and no one living here can attend full-time school. I don't know about part- time though. Something to do with the funding for this place. So I could get a 10 day eviction notice if I went back to college and were caught. *sigh*

There's a lot of classes I suppose I could take online, but I really need a structured environment. Or to put it another way, I need the proverbial pitchfork in my back. I used to be very self motivated, but depression has taken a lot of that out of me.
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Old 09-02-2017, 04:33 PM
 
Location: Mexico City (at the moment)
1,345 posts, read 471,185 times
Reputation: 1963
Quote:
Originally Posted by volosong View Post
Recently retired and am still in the process of moving, so I missed the start of the current semester. College/University classes are a real part of my retirement plan. I'm done collecting degrees and now want to take classes in subject of interest to me.

Among them is physics because that explains how the world and 'stuff' works. Then follow that up with some electrical engineering courses. There are some things that I want to build, but need the theory/knowledge first.

My local community college has reduced senior tuition. Not sure about the university.

Yep, me too. Practical applied knowledge!


I am not retired just yet (3 more years!) but have looked into the local community college in the city where we will be retiring too. With the time limit on the GI bill lifted (now good for life!) I can get an applied science associates in several different disciplines I am interested in. The GI bill pays up to $1,800 per month living expenses while the school is in session, but would not cover the tuition for me. That said, the entire courses tuition at this community college are only $2,800 for the entire year so it would be a win for me for sure.

A two year degree would be right for me, as I would likely not be going for a third career (on career #2 right now), but simply for interest and expansion of my current knowledge.

The courses they offer I have looked at are:

1- Aviation Technology. General studies into becoming a small plane/helicopter pilot. The medical requirements such as vision can be waived if one is only looking at the degree, but this would feed into my desire to join in the multi passenger microlight community that is active in the area we will be retiring in. I flew microlights in South Africa when I lived there from 2003-2006, and have never gotten that bug out of my system since.

2- Gunsmithing. I have always had an interest. Build them, design them, modify them, repair them.

3-Computer networking technology. A build on skill set for smart home technology and security system designing I have always been interested in.

4-Computer systems and applications. Something to build on as a field I work in now to some degree, but just to expand my knowledge. I am especially fond of open source programming design (I have played with Arduinos for years) which also plays into my desire for smart home applications.

5- Electrical & Instrumentation Technology. Again something I already do to a large degree, but would enjoy new perspectives in motors and controllers, A/C and D/C circuit designs and repair, and practical applications, which are all part of that degree.

One thing they do not offer is an advanced AutoCad course.



I want to keep the knife sharp in retirement. I'll deal with the exams and study cycles like I always did in the past.
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Old 09-02-2017, 08:37 PM
 
3,455 posts, read 2,332,618 times
Reputation: 7003
I am over 55 and will soon return to graduate school. I already have a couple of graduate degrees, but want to acquire another certification in my field that will require something known as a Post-Master's certificate. It will take about 15 months. Since I am an academic, I still get excited about going to school and learning something new.
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Old 09-03-2017, 07:48 AM
 
1 posts, read 555 times
Reputation: 15
I am turning 57 in October and returned to school due to potential layoffs in my department. The web development program I am enrolled in at my local community college is completely online classes.

In December 2016, my boss sat four staff members in our department down and informed us of potential layoffs. He stated that he thought it would happen in 2018. We were all pretty much working 10 hour days at that point. He also limited our overtime to a max of 2.5 hours a week. Surprisingly, I was so excited about my future! I felt like my time had opened up to do what I wanted. However, I wasn't sure what I wanted. LOL Although I was excited about my future, obviously there was some stress involved. Figuring out what my options were financially and job search wise.

The first few months I researched various career options. I kept going back to computer technology, but I do not excel at programming. I looked at web development and bingo! I found my career! I am currently enrolled in my first web introduction class and loving it! It was also a lesson to me that I need to keep up my skill set.
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Old 09-03-2017, 10:05 AM
 
Location: Straddling two worlds
2,540 posts, read 806,768 times
Reputation: 1780
Quote:
Originally Posted by batesr99 View Post
I am turning 57 in October and returned to school due to potential layoffs in my department. The web development program I am enrolled in at my local community college is completely online classes.

In December 2016, my boss sat four staff members in our department down and informed us of potential layoffs. He stated that he thought it would happen in 2018. We were all pretty much working 10 hour days at that point. He also limited our overtime to a max of 2.5 hours a week. Surprisingly, I was so excited about my future! I felt like my time had opened up to do what I wanted. However, I wasn't sure what I wanted. LOL Although I was excited about my future, obviously there was some stress involved. Figuring out what my options were financially and job search wise.

The first few months I researched various career options. I kept going back to computer technology, but I do not excel at programming. I looked at web development and bingo! I found my career! I am currently enrolled in my first web introduction class and loving it! It was also a lesson to me that I need to keep up my skill set.
Brilliant! What I have never understood is how it is reported that people who are already laid off go back to school. You can't go to school and collect unemployment.
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Old 09-03-2017, 11:27 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,612 posts, read 39,986,663 times
Reputation: 23757
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hannah5555 View Post
... You can't go to school and collect unemployment.
after 'downsizing' ...By being in grad school (one weekend / month) ... I was able to collect 2 yrs unemployment (+ medical) and NOT do weekly job search
https://esd.wa.gov/about-employees/TAA-FAQ

I had 34 yrs of uninterrupted employment prior to 'return' to College. Slight adjustment required.

School was great, but not the caliber of 40 yrs ago. I get a rigorous education, I suspect you would need to leave the USA. (in USA... colleges are permitted to operate = 'grab the tuition dollars, educate them in careers that do not exist, via profs and content that is out of date, Graduate all-comers, repeat as necessary')
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Old 09-04-2017, 05:12 PM
 
13,321 posts, read 25,574,131 times
Reputation: 20505
Until I decided to retire to small-town Colorado (no colleges) I did expect to take some Osher courses or audit a course here and there. No desire for a degree. I absolutely dislike the school process, always have. I have always gone to school about jobs/work, not learning for its own sake.

I think there are occasional lectures in the town where I'm moving, about the geology or history of the area, and that would interest me a lot. Maybe the Historical Society. There are readings at an independent bookstore at the ski resort town. That could suffice for me. I like listening and discussing and hearing intelligent discussions, dislike spitting out papers and tests to prove anything (although I've always been good at it, as long as there wasn't anything higher math about it).
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Old 09-04-2017, 05:43 PM
 
Location: Arizona
5,955 posts, read 5,309,871 times
Reputation: 17977
We have Lifelong Learning where I live. $20 a year. We have some retired professors that are very interesting. I never took an art class in high school or college but I take every art history class LL offers.
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Old 09-04-2017, 05:59 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,593 posts, read 17,589,896 times
Reputation: 27682
If you are in a career and could some progression with the degree, go for it, as long as you weigh the student debt against the potential gains. If you are pursuing something that isn't lucrative, you need to see how it impacts your retirement finances.
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Old 09-04-2017, 06:20 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
16,421 posts, read 5,359,120 times
Reputation: 51369
I was a college dropout at 19, but I went back in my 40s. I took classes part-time at our local community college while also holding down a job. It took me two years, but I finally graduated with an A.A. degree and went on to take upper division classes at our local state university.

I truly enjoyed the experience and appreciated it a lot more than I did when I was younger. Being mature and having had some life experience makes a difference. I don't think I could have appreciated King Lear or cared much about political science as a teenager. It was a bit strange, though, to be older than all my classmates and many of my instructors. I often got mistaken for one of them.

After taking three classes I had to drop out again due to eldercare responsibilities, and since then I've only gone back once, to take two semesters of German. This was strictly for pleasure - if you can call studying German grammar "pleasure" - because I had relatives in Germany that were coming to visit, and I wanted to be able to converse with them.

Now that I'm retired I've thought of going back to finish my B.A., but two things hold me back. One is that I've gotten spoiled having no responsibilities and no schedule. Going to school would feel like having a job again. The other is that I feel guilty that I might be taking the place of a younger person who really needs the education. But for anyone who doesn't have those concerns, I'd say Go for it! You won't be sorry.
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