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Old 09-04-2017, 11:48 PM
 
Location: Whereever we have our RV parked
8,761 posts, read 7,693,193 times
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Going back to school. No way. If Im interested in a topic I can read a book. I had 20 years of education. That's plenty.7
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Old 09-05-2017, 01:29 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,537 posts, read 39,914,033 times
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Ulterior motive... access to College sports center / pool!
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Old 09-05-2017, 06:56 AM
 
5,819 posts, read 5,177,503 times
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This is why I chose a University town for retirement.

The state's OSHER program is here, and I take several classes a week for fun 9 months out of the year. Since Osher classes are planned locally, the subject of OSHER classes varies widely from state to state. Ours are varied and fun.

Community members here also have free or very cheap access to all University amenities like Wellness Center exercise classes, special lectures and symposia, concerts, gallery talks, plays and the like.

An Osher friend of mine in her early 80s also audits one University class every year, just to keep her mind active. We don't have free or cheap university level classes for seniors here, though - the cost to audit is the same as regular in-state tuition. It isn't the cost that keeps me from doing this, though - I can afford it. It is having to commit to going on campus 2 or 3 days a week to attend the course. As Bay said, I like having most of my days free to do whatever I want.

I tried 2 years of retirement in a resort town in a beautiful area and nearly died of boredom. Now that I'm here in the University town, I'm in my element. I LOVE it!
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Old 09-05-2017, 08:51 AM
 
20,077 posts, read 11,137,874 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BabyJuly View Post
I'd like to hear about senior experiences about returning to school. Do you live near a Community College that provides interesting courses, through a "Life Long Learning Institute" or "Workforce Development and Continuing Education". Do you get reduced tuition? Are you taking courses for fun? Are you going back to train for a new career because you could not find a job; especially for those who were let go earlier than you anticipated?

I stopped working at 58, and did not try to look for another job in my field. I was fed up and traveled for a while. Now at 59 I have enrolled in a year long course that will train me for a new career. I hope to be a "Teacher of English for Speakers of Other Languages" next year. I want to do both volunteer and paid work teaching English, for there are a lot of immigrants and refugees in need of help in my area. It took a while to come to a decision about what I wanted to do with my time. I just know I need to keep busy; a quiet retirement with no obligations is not for me. I am resisting the urge to think that I am too old to reinvent myself. So far, I love my class that I am taking and I am not the oldest one there.
That shouldn't be a year-long course. There are a couple of pertinent certifications, but those shouldn't take a year to get.
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Old 09-05-2017, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Straddling two worlds
2,517 posts, read 799,044 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stealthrabbit View Post
ulterior motive... Access to college sports center / pool!
yes!
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Old 09-05-2017, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Straddling two worlds
2,517 posts, read 799,044 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 601halfdozen0theother View Post
I tried 2 years of retirement in a resort town in a beautiful area and nearly died of boredom. Now that I'm here in the University town, I'm in my element. I LOVE it!
That's my biggest worry and why I am NOT moving to Florida. Can you share where you landed?
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Old 09-05-2017, 12:35 PM
 
Location: The Conterminous United States
22,554 posts, read 47,332,356 times
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I entered college for the first time at 52 and, three years later, I'm still here.

I love it.

I have never met a student that wasn't nice to me. In fact, most of them are scared kids that like to have a motherly figure around.

My professors have gone out of their way to make sure that I'm doing well. I never was a great student, but now I'm in the international honor society. I'm starting a club, will be the managing editor for a news magazine that I started at school.

I've always wanted to go to school, but never had the opportunity to do so. Someone that I met through business once snidely asked me, "So what do you actually think you're going to get out of this?"

I calmly answered, "My degree."

Getting my bachelors may or may not help me, but I won't die without completing my degree and that's what matters to me.

For those worried about finances, apply for financial aid. I've been poor all of my adult life, I don't have any retirement money and no way to get any. The way I look at it, I'm going to be broke, anyway.

My mother has Alzheimer's. She hung onto every penny that she could throughout her life. She did without cable and a thousand other things. She paid for everything with cash, including every vehicle she ever owned. She had a sizeable nest egg, then she got sick. It's all gone now.

Do what you want to do, live your life, live your dream.
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Old 09-05-2017, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Massachusetts
6,105 posts, read 7,258,192 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by texan2yankee View Post
My mom went back to school at 50 years old and got a master's degree in social work after working in accounting for 30 years. She worked 22 years in her second profession, loved it, and retired at 74 years old. She always said she wished she had changed careers sooner and it was never too late to pursue a passion.

Mom also said she kept her mouth shut most of the time in class discussions.
Kudos!
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Old 09-05-2017, 09:12 PM
 
394 posts, read 156,333 times
Reputation: 1097
Quote:
Originally Posted by BabyJuly View Post
I'd like to hear about senior experiences about returning to school. Do you live near a Community College that provides interesting courses, through a "Life Long Learning Institute" or "Workforce Development and Continuing Education". Do you get reduced tuition? Are you taking courses for fun? Are you going back to train for a new career because you could not find a job; especially for those who were let go earlier than you anticipated?

I stopped working at 58, and did not try to look for another job in my field. I was fed up and traveled for a while. Now at 59 I have enrolled in a year long course that will train me for a new career. I hope to be a "Teacher of English for Speakers of Other Languages" next year. I want to do both volunteer and paid work teaching English, for there are a lot of immigrants and refugees in need of help in my area. It took a while to come to a decision about what I wanted to do with my time. I just know I need to keep busy; a quiet retirement with no obligations is not for me. I am resisting the urge to think that I am too old to reinvent myself. So far, I love my class that I am taking and I am not the oldest one there.
I am an ESL teacher for adults. I have taught adults English and Citizenship Preparation for the last 11 years. It helps that I speak a fair amount of Spanish.
I discovered this job when I was 50 as a substitute teacher. I am now 61. The ESL director and school principal encouraged me to enroll in school (local university) and get an Adult teaching Credential, specializing in ESL, full-time.

It cost me about $3K to take all of the classes, but I can teach this subject at any public adult school. I work anywhere from 18-25 hours a week, and have all weekends, nights, and vacations off (without pay). The pay is fairly good and I will get a small retirement. I also have the opportunity to tutor students (private instruction) when I have the extra time. I am paid by a public school system.

The students are great and I love working here. This job is excellent for those who are semi-retired.
The only downside is that there is rarely full-time work, and your vacations are not paid.
I am so happy I found this type of work right before I retire.

There is another teacher who is 80 and still teaching two ESL classes.
He is my hero. If he can still teach, I hope that I can for at least the next 5 or 6 years part time.
Another downside are the vacations. You basically have 4 weeks in June, a week in November, two weeks in December, and a week in April for Spring vacation. Other than that, no other time. They count on you to be there and teach the days school is in session.
Good Luck!
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Old 09-06-2017, 07:02 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,541 posts, read 17,525,434 times
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What would scare me as a senior would be (if it applies) the mountains of student loan debt that cannot be discharged with relatively few years to pay them off.

I graduated from East Tennessee State University. It's an entirely normal regional state university. When I started college in 2004, I was "all in" - tuition, book, fees, everything - for just a nose under $5,000. I did not live on campus. I was in the first high school class able to access Tennessee lottery scholarship money. That was essentially a full ride for me - I had merit scholarships that were basically pocket money. Today, it is $10,000 all in. I don't think the lottery scholarship has even had a COLA.

Outside of healthcare, government work (including K-12 and the state university), and a Fortune 500, local employment where a four-year degree is required (or even helpful) is slim pickings. While the school isn't "bad," it's likely about the same as any regional state university in the country, and those closest to job centers are going to be able to put their graduates in a better position to secure gainful employment. Unless someone 55+ was majoring in a healthcare related field, can pay for it without it otherwise seriously impacting their finances, or getting a degree where their employer is (mostly) paying for it, I certainly would not recommend going back to school as a senior. You could easily go into $50,000 worth of debt with an interest rate of 6%+ for no financial gain, depending on degree, current income, and location, with only about ten years to pay it off. Unlike other forms of debt, you cannot flush this through a BK or debt settlement if the sky comes falling in. I would love to go to graduate school and would be the first person in my family to get a graduate education, but I would probably have to take out tens of thousands of dollars in nondischargeable debt to do so. I also don't see it benefiting my career. At this time, further education is a pipe dream for me.

A friend of mine just turned 32 and graduated with her photography degree from Middle TN State back in May. She loves traveling, and has been trying to get on with an airline as a flight attendant. She hasn't been able to do so, and the student loan bills are coming due. Meanwhile, she moved from Murfreesboro back to Kingsport because she couldn't find a job paying well enough in Nashville to keep up with the cost of living, and is now stuck hostessing at a local Red Lobster. When most of her peers are buying homes, getting settled in professional jobs, and moving up, she's basically stuck in a place most 22 year olds wouldn't be, with no obvious way to pay off this debt and a decade less to pay it off than traditional students. It's poor decision making and sad.

Another thing to remember is that nontraditional students may not be eligible for all the financial aid a traditional student could get. I know when I started college, the lottery scholarship was not available to older students. That's an additional $5,000 the older student would have to come up with.
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