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Old 09-03-2017, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Paranoid State
13,047 posts, read 10,466,890 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NYgal1542 View Post
I think the entire system has to have a good overhaul.

In my area, there are several nursing homes (do not know about Assisted Living places). Most of the NH facilities have been investigated, most recently the nursing home my sister lived in for 10 years before passing away 2 years ago.

Whoever is responsible for setting these places up had better take a wake up pill. You cannot expect to get good, responsible care when you only pay the caregivers minimum wage. Expect them to work double shifts? Give up their family time because they have to cover for another employee? Have you ever seen what these people have to do?? Some patients are totally unable to move themselves and weigh a lot; yes there are devices to help an aid/caregiver move the patient, but if they do that several times per day......... can you imagine what this is doing to the caregiver? How many have to go out on medical leave because their bodies are wrecked?

They need more help. Better equipment. Better paychecks. We want our old and/or disabled to be treated with compassion and respect, why aren't we treating their caregivers with more respect and money? Yes, I know, the politicians "need" more money..... how else could they afford their lovely homes, cars, vacations?

Remember that saying "you get what you pay for"?? This also applies in the workplace, too.
Yes, we need to raise the compensation of the caregivers. The elderly just need to pay more to fund it.
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Old 09-04-2017, 08:48 AM
 
6,856 posts, read 3,887,202 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nov3 View Post
Nope. Doesn't cost a person more to be kind to humanity. It does cost the elders more to be heard and valued. Sad really.

Profiting off another's natural life progressions. Alf's are money makers ..
I've yet to see the admins living meagerly...But their residents sure are.

Of course it costs more to give good care. It requires a lot more care givers and they have to be paid. It requires more house keepers and laundry staff, and they need to be paid. These are not volunteer organizations. They are businesses. It's no different really than paying for child care at the other end of life.
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Old 09-04-2017, 09:19 AM
 
2,706 posts, read 1,553,392 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SportyandMisty View Post
Yes, we need to raise the compensation of the caregivers. The elderly just need to pay more to fund it.
And How do we do that, given that so many elderly have no retirement savings and incomes (SS) barely above the poverty level?
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Old 09-04-2017, 09:39 AM
 
6,856 posts, read 3,887,202 times
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I don't see a solution. The private sector facilities are too costly for most seniors, and public sector revenues are being cut, not expanded.
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Old 09-04-2017, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Central Mexico and Central Florida
7,110 posts, read 3,475,109 times
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Our solution:

Earlier this year we purchased a house (single story, 4000 sq. feet, heated pool, solar panels, separate casita) in Central Mexico (Lake Chapala). We also lived here 2008-2012, leaving to care for my elderly FIL in the US.

Our plan is what many elderly expats have done before us, some of whom were our neighbors in 2008-2012. STAY in our own homes here and HIRE as much help as we need to make it possible. Doctors here still make HOUSE CALLS....it's easy enough to get good care, from caring people.

Right now, based on US exchange rates, home workers (non-nursing) are paid equivalent $2.75 an hour; practical nurses are paid 3.25 and skilled nurses are paid 4.00. Doctor house visits are usually the equivalent of $15 to $20 USD. Medicines are often cheaper here.
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Old 09-04-2017, 10:32 AM
 
2,706 posts, read 1,553,392 times
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^ But can you climb over the coming wall as you age?

Seriously, our historic solution has been immigrant labor, legal or not. You'd think certain folks would recognize the value of immigrant labor to aging seniors, but I guess, since we're not coal miners, we don't count. And given that many who need help are women...you get the idea.
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Old 09-04-2017, 10:52 AM
 
13,993 posts, read 7,458,129 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbear99 View Post
And How do we do that, given that so many elderly have no retirement savings and incomes (SS) barely above the poverty level?
I think that was written as hyperbole.

Recall that Medicaid nursing home funding was really lousy in the 1970's. There were all kinds of media stories about it. "Care" that was abuse. Medicaid funding was increased to staff nursing homes properly.

This stuff is cyclical. Right now, Medicaid doesn't fund nursing homes properly again and with 2017 politics, it's likely to get worse.

Easily 70% of the elderly lack the wealth to pay for a skilled nursing facility. After they burn through their 3 months of Medicare coverage, it falls to Medicaid. It's expensive and the bill is split between the Federal government and the state government. Everyone is already cash strapped and the demand for Medicaid by the aging Boomers is going to swamp the system.
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Old 09-04-2017, 11:03 AM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,746 posts, read 4,225,531 times
Reputation: 6866
Quote:
Originally Posted by craigiri View Post
Well, just to be very basic about it, MA has the highest income, best medical care and best education in the USA......

So it would certainly make sense that educated and wealthier and smarter clients AND caregivers would both spend more and ask for more. <snip> .
The cost for care in MA is significantly higher than Maryland, Conn, NJ, and HA. All of the latter states have a higher household income than MA. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...ates_by_income

MD and MA have similar education rankings. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...nal_attainment

Perhaps MA, thankfully, pays higher wages than MD, Conn, NJ and HA.
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Old 09-04-2017, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Central Mexico and Central Florida
7,110 posts, read 3,475,109 times
Reputation: 10192
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbear99 View Post
^ But can you climb over the coming wall as you age?

Seriously, our historic solution has been immigrant labor, legal or not. You'd think certain folks would recognize the value of immigrant labor to aging seniors, but I guess, since we're not coal miners, we don't count. And given that many who need help are women...you get the idea.
We're already on the FUN side of the wall

FYI: I was actually born a coal miner's daughter (Scranton, PA, anthracite).
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Old 09-04-2017, 02:36 PM
 
358 posts, read 223,843 times
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CRAIGIRI -That said, I think the best solution(s) to this whole thing would be contained in a good universal health care system...other countries do it, why can't we? This could be supplemented by payments from the clients who desire a higher standard (single rooms, better located facilities, etc.).

I bet you've never lived in England. I have and the problem is NHS has financial targets just like U.S. facilities. The local councils control whether long term care is paid for by NHS or not. How likely that is to happen depends SOLELY on current budget they have - regardless of what they say. Thanks to the laws, regulations and paperwork required, they always can find a reason to reject someone.

This is not a blanket rejection of single payer system but a warning that too many Americans have a completely false and romanticized view of how it works today.
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