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Old 09-09-2017, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Colorado
79 posts, read 54,014 times
Reputation: 346

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So now our SS numbers are out there for the rest of our lives, available and for sale to any criminal. A year of credit monitoring won't fix that.

I expect all my data is already out there for sale. I was affected by the OPM hack - they had my SS on job applications. In fact my SS is on hundreds of job applications, as online submittal required them. Then there were the Anthem, Target, and God knows how many data hacks.

I froze my credit reports a few years ago. It was relatively easy to unfreeze them temporarily when I needed to, though there were fees. I set up multi-factor authentication for all accounts that offered it. I try to keep financial matters simple and easy to track. I have only one card - and it's an AMEX charge card, not a credit card.

I don't know what else to do - worry that none of it is enough. It scares me that our personal and financial data is collected and held in so many databases anyway. It's time that companies that have our personal data do a better job protecting it, because as far as I can tell, they don't suffer the consequences of the big hacks - we do. So I'll join any class action suit - not for the tiny amount of money I'd receive, but because companies who hold this data should be held accountable for their screw-ups.
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Old 09-09-2017, 09:10 AM
 
71,962 posts, read 71,997,171 times
Reputation: 49548
fidelity has a team of hackers who regularly scan the dark web for fidelity client account info

they shut our accounts down instantly last year when they found my wifes account and password for sale . she never logs in on line so that was spooky.

there is nothing we can do except go on with our lives normally as this stuff is always going on and always will .

keep in mind , all this credit monitoring and freeze's only works with consumer credit . if someone takes a business loan out using your data the big three agencies are not involved .

commercial credit has different agencies involved like d&b .
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Old 09-09-2017, 09:41 AM
 
18 posts, read 6,600 times
Reputation: 86
Ok, just want to see if I've got this right.

Some nebulous companies called "Credit Reporting Agencies" were granted permission to assemble all of our personal financial data without our consent. The data they have assembled is the equivalent of a hydrogen bomb, identity-theft wise.

Apparently, these agencies "secure" our critical data how they see fit. That is, they determine how much they want to spend on securing our data, and they establish their own cyber security guidelines, based on the budgets they set. (One agency's budget appears to have been too low.)

That agency informs us that they haven't been good stewards of our data, after weeks of the data being exposed, and now it's all our responsibility.

We have to log in to a dubious website to find the status of our data, and sign up for a dubious program that may compromise our legal rights. We must constantly monitor our credit reports, and bank accounts, and tax returns, and medical records until the day we die. We must freeze and unfreeze our financial information held by these Credit Reporting Agencies, who by the way, may even charge us for doing so!

And if we find that our data is being used to file illegal tax returns or access bank accounts? We have to somehow clear it all up on our own. We have to contact agencies, file reports, hire legal help, all at our own expense. The agency that left our data exposed doesn't have to help at all.

Did I miss anything?
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Old 09-09-2017, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Bloomington IN
6,553 posts, read 7,833,987 times
Reputation: 16043
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gixxer1K View Post
Whats worse is that this same company will be the one giving you a bad credit score if your number was stolen! Sounds fair to me screw up and have your system hacked and yet we have to pay the price for it. The only thing they're doing is giving you 1 years free identity theft protection once you've enrolled. Sorry but it's their screw up they should give it to you for life.
This is not exactly correct, IF you do what you should. I am a very recent victim of identity theft (in the last month) including my name, address and full social security number. The credit reporting agencies can't permanently ding your credit history if you do everything you should upon finding out you are the victim of theft and banks, etc. are required to work to repair the mistakes.

Things I've learned one must do: Contact all reporting 3 agencies and request a fraud alert be added to your history; report it to the FTC; file a police report IF the number is used; and report it to the appropriate state agency. Obviously contact the bank or institution that allowed your number to be used.

The fraud alert should be free. We added a credit freeze to my account. It's also cheap to do, and I have no need for additional credit right now. I live in one of 2 states that the credit freeze is free to do for victims of identity theft. We also purchased an identity theft protection plan from another company. It helps that I have a Discover card. Discover will now alert you if your SS number is used for credit purposes.

I do have a major problem with Equifax though. Their website does not allow you to check if you are one of the victims. It just signs you up for the ID theft when you click through. I didn't need that as I already have it. They also do not intend to inform all of the victims. That is huge problem!

Based on my recent experience it's not just credit cards that are opened with SS #'s. My thieves opened up multiple cellular accounts in my name. Fortunately I became aware of it within about a week of it happening.
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Old 09-09-2017, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in America
12,304 posts, read 10,796,678 times
Reputation: 20542
The executives of Equifax should be arrested and charged criminally. The entire company should be shut down immediately. This is beyond ridiculous.
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Old 09-09-2017, 10:03 AM
 
71,962 posts, read 71,997,171 times
Reputation: 49548
Quote:
Originally Posted by Al Bumin View Post
Ok, just want to see if I've got this right.

Some nebulous companies called "Credit Reporting Agencies" were granted permission to assemble all of our personal financial data without our consent. The data they have assembled is the equivalent of a hydrogen bomb, identity-theft wise.


Did I miss anything?
YES !

with every credit card , loan , etc you give consent for the release of that info . it is not without your consent . it is right there in the documents you sign and agree to .

it is no different than the health data banks that store info on every lab test you ever had if it went through insurance . you agreed to that too .
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Old 09-09-2017, 10:18 AM
 
6,904 posts, read 7,312,014 times
Reputation: 9811
Quote:
The credit reporting agencies can't permanently ding your credit history if you do everything you should upon finding out you are the victim of theft
Aahhh, but as of now we are not ID theft victims.

So we don't fall under that no permanent ding 'protection.'

Very, very good to know for the future though.

And sorry to disagree with you, given your experience, but Gixxwe1k is correct when s/he says Equifax SHOULD provide free identity theft protection for life, given that it's the one that failed in its duty to protect the information. (But then that would eliminate one way they could make more money off of us, wouldn't it?)

I have half a mind to just lay low and not do anything. I did put in the last 6 of my social to find out if my info could have been compromised. But to be honest...no, I don't have any faith in Equifax being the one who helps monitor our credit activity. I almost didn't do it. but figured it was one way to find out my info may NOT have been affected.....

That's why I'm s curious as to how many people are doing the credit freeze, versus fraud alert, or NOW signing up with a third party monitoring service. One cyber exert said the credit freeze is the nuclear option, "but worth considering." Du, we know that already. I'm not sure what I'm going to do yet...but even as I wait days tick by....

Last edited by selhars; 09-09-2017 at 10:45 AM..
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Old 09-09-2017, 10:24 AM
 
2,215 posts, read 746,282 times
Reputation: 1376
That equifax website gave me different answers. I got 3 maybe, 1 yes and 1 no but in all cases wanted me to sign up for their 1 year free service.

I'm just going to freeze my credit at all three. I got my free credit reports in June and everything was ok. Checked all accounts and changed passwords. Removed my saved CC info from sites like Amazon and my game subscription. I'll just enter it manually when I want to purchase/renew something.

Not much more I can do for now.
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Old 09-09-2017, 11:21 AM
 
6,904 posts, read 7,312,014 times
Reputation: 9811
^^ I think I may do that too. Thanks.
I just removed my saved CC info from the major sites I shop on (not even that often, but they're major retailers so could be hack targets.)

I'm going to get my free credit reports for this year...once they're in hand then I may reluctantly put a freeze on. I have to double check one more tiny bit of info about the fraud alert...I think that's only free IF you've already been an ID theft victim. But as of now I'm still deciding between the freeze and the fraud alert.
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Old 09-09-2017, 11:33 AM
 
4,455 posts, read 2,632,495 times
Reputation: 10401
Quote:
Originally Posted by Delahanty View Post
And who is it who asks for your Medicare info? Why, the doctor, ER, or other medical provider, of course. You know, the ones who also need your SSN.

For those who carry their Medicare cards with them, and lose them, this will be great. Unless they also carry their SS cards.

Until the SSN is no longer used as an identifier, identity theft will continue to be a threat.
NOOOOO.

You do NOT need to give them your SS number and they can't refuse to treat you.

If you have enough insurance and will not be billed for anything, they do not need, nor can they require your SS number.

You are misinformed.

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