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Old 09-13-2017, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna. (birthplace)
12,351 posts, read 7,513,144 times
Reputation: 15950

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
1. We all have dress codes at work - just try showing up naked and see how that works for you. So the question really is how strict and rigid the dress code is.

2. For sure not all dress codes at work constitute "regimentation for regimentation's sake". If an employee is meeting the public, the employer has a legitimate interest in the employee NOT looking like he or she spend the previous night sleeping in a ditch beside the road.

3. I actually prefer NOT to look like a slob if I am meeting the public in an official or semi-official capacity, regardless of what is or is not required of me.


Having said that, I realize that some work dress codes can indeed be unnecessarily rigid. It depends on the overall situation. However, the general trend over the past three or four decades has been in the opposite direction - anything goes. Church, funeral, etc.? It seems to make no difference to some people. Once I saw a substitute teacher in a public high school with ratty, torn, cut-off jeans. That is just not appropriate. Why do you think judges wear robes? It's to lend a little dignity and respect to the courtroom situation. There is a difference between a courtroom (or funeral, etc.) and a back-yard pool party or barbeque.
I'll elaborate a little; I came to this job in 1972, after five years in a "megaversity" environment in which "delivering the goods" (in the form of good grades) meant a lot more than how the job got done. And thanks as much to personal background as coursework, I didn't have to study as much as some of my peers.

But I landed in a strictly blue-collar environment, with a very limited (and jaded) set of unattached singles. The off-duty hours weren't very stimulating, so I devoted a lot of effort to the job (on a non-traditional shift) and had both feedback from my shift supervisors, and "hard numbers" to prove I was getting very good at it.

And the department head took notice; unfortunately, he was a World War II veteran with a strong belief in spit-and-polish, and my "reward" was to be a "promotion" to a daylight shift, where more resources were available, the "regimen" much more formal, and my "24/7 knowledge" wouldn't count for as much. I pushed, instead, for the 12-hour shifts and more frequent days off common in the industry at the time, but was turned down.

The conflict eventually resolved itself when the economy turned sour, and I was selected for a layoff despite the superior performance measures. Looking back, I still recall those overnights spent in the "nerve center" of a continuous operation as the most personally-satisfying job I ever held. But it wouldn't have been worth it at the price of constant office-politicking, and senseless subjugation for subjugation's sake.

Last edited by 2nd trick op; 09-13-2017 at 02:47 PM..
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Old 09-13-2017, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,103 posts, read 54,597,263 times
Reputation: 66501
Anything dealing with medical stuff. Human innards are not my cup of tea.

A waitress would be a close second.
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Old 09-13-2017, 03:21 PM
Status: "Be yourself. What's the alternative?" (set 21 days ago)
 
8,695 posts, read 10,847,720 times
Reputation: 12754
Mortician, Child Care worker, Pilot, Assembly Line worker, Housekeeping and lots of others.
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Old 09-13-2017, 03:53 PM
 
Location: South Florida
195 posts, read 106,352 times
Reputation: 1157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nanny Goat View Post
Mortician, Child Care worker, Pilot, Assembly Line worker, Housekeeping and lots of others.
Why Pilot?
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Old 09-13-2017, 03:57 PM
 
1,441 posts, read 1,121,773 times
Reputation: 4859
Anything involving needles or blood. I would spend all day alternating between fainting and vomiting.
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Old 09-13-2017, 03:58 PM
 
Location: South Florida
195 posts, read 106,352 times
Reputation: 1157
Quote:
Originally Posted by PNW-type-gal View Post
My second degree was in electrical engineering (my first was in literature, lol) and I discovered I detested the high tech cubicle life. My next degrees were in geology and I did more field work, out of the office, which I vastly preferred.

The only job I have ever been fired from was in my late teens as a waitress - in a "haze the new girl" scenario my first day they gave me the table with the known demanding jerks and I was not able to reign in my temper, lol.

But pretty much any retail job serving the general public would be on my list of worst possible jobs. I did make sure my son worked retail while he was in high school so he could see what life on the other side of the counter was like - it's a learning experience, definitely.
Funny. I did exactly the same thing. And at 16 years old he would come home and complain about his moronic boss and I would tell him that he could look forward to a lifetime of this if he didn't decide what he wants to do and then go out and get the education to do it. By HS graduation he still hadn't decided so he joined the Air Force to learn some new things and give himself some more time to decide on the end game.
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Old 09-13-2017, 04:08 PM
 
9,197 posts, read 9,278,507 times
Reputation: 28813
Coal miner.

Several men in my mother's side and generation of her family were coal miners. They had a constant fear of cave-ins, explosions, and accidents. Two of them ended up with black lung disease. There are probably worse jobs, but I can't think of them.
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Old 09-13-2017, 04:34 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
14,242 posts, read 44,929,003 times
Reputation: 12831
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2nd trick op View Post
I'll elaborate a little; I came to this job in 1972, after five years in a "megaversity" environment in which "delivering the goods" (in the form of good grades) meant a lot more than how the job got done. And thanks as much to personal background as coursework, I didn't have to study as much as some of my peers.

But I landed in a strictly blue-collar environment, with a very limited (and jaded) set of unattached singles. The off-duty hours weren't very stimulating, so I devoted a lot of effort to the job (on a non-traditional shift) and had both feedback from my shift supervisors, and "hard numbers" to prove I was getting very good at it.

And the department head took notice; unfortunately, he was a World War II veteran with a strong belief in spit-and-polish, and my "reward" was to be a "promotion" to a daylight shift, where more resources were available, the "regimen" much more formal, and my "24/7 knowledge" wouldn't count for as much. I pushed, instead, for the 12-hour shifts and more frequent days off common in the industry at the time, but was turned down.

The conflict eventually resolved itself when the economy turned sour, and I was selected for a layoff despite the superior performance measures. Looking back, I still recall those overnights spent in the "nerve center" of a continuous operation as the most personally-satisfying job I ever held. But it wouldn't have been worth it at the price of constant office-politicking, and senseless subjugation for subjugation's sake.
This would be my nightmare as well. Too bad you were not in a position to quit on the spot, which is what I would have preferred to do if given such a "reward". Follow that up, if possible, by hiring on with the competition and give that guy pure hell.
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Old 09-13-2017, 04:46 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
14,242 posts, read 44,929,003 times
Reputation: 12831
For me, several jobs I am reasonably qualified for would be nightmares. Public school teacher would be one, being part of a unionized batch of "education" majors, in my experience anyway in rural Georgia in the 70's they were not intellectually gifted and didn't push what "gifts" they had very hard anyway. The political bickering. Having a boss who is not fit to kiss my big toe, from an intellectual point of view (the principals I remember from elementary and high school). "Throttling back" so as not to make my "comrades" in the union look as bad as they in fact were. Ugh.

This is not in any way to "slag off" on people who made a go out of being a teacher, particularly the handful who actually taught me useful things in public school. I admire their ability to tolerate the incessant BS, herd the bulk of numbskulls in the class through the day, and still have something to give me. Most of these were older gentlemen, who had retired from a first career, who decided for whatever reason to have a "twilight" second career teaching. But it would not be for me.

Ironically I have on and off tutored and, not to brag, am damn good at it, and have taught classes of sorts to nuclear plant operators, customs inspectors, and other "hard" audiences (they will eat you for lunch if you don't know your stuff). Was quite successful with *that*. Well, I knew my stuff, and imparted it from a point of view of thoroughly knowing the technology, so was able to answer questions "out of left field" with no problems.

When you are obviously by far the smartest guy (or gal) in the room - that means you are in the wrong room!

Where I work now is anything but that Hell of mediocrity - Have a good idea here, be able to sell it to management (which means you have thought through not only how it will work, but how to get it paid for) and away you go. Just like that guy who invented the Xerox...Nobody cares (within very wide guidelines) what I wear or what hours I work, what matters is being technically right, doing good work, working well with other similarly talented colleagues, not making stupid mistakes, not damaging equipment and particularly not getting myself or others injured.
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Old 09-13-2017, 05:16 PM
 
Location: Bay Area, CA
29,038 posts, read 45,039,938 times
Reputation: 20425
Quote:
Originally Posted by djmilf View Post
Internet forum moderator. Seriously.
I used to moderate on C-D, and it wasn't THAT bad... just got a bit sick of the whining (e.g. "Why did my post get deleted, when so-and-so's didn't? Waaaah!!" Also couldn't post like a "regular person" on anything controversial, without having people tell me mods should be "neutral."

As for the original question, I think my nightmare job would be working a factory line. Just the endless standing in one place, and repetitive actions, would drive me absolutely insane... I need to be doing different things, and a combination of standing/sitting/walking (like my actual job has) to not get bored and sore. Not to mention, many of those factories are surrounded by health hazards. No thanks! I also wouldn't fare well in any job with heavy manual labor, like construction or loading docks, due to my various physical issues.
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