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Old 03-27-2009, 06:05 PM
 
Location: home...finally, home .
8,235 posts, read 18,506,963 times
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Where is that? Solivita .
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People may not recall what you said to them, but they will always remember how you made them feel .
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Old 03-28-2009, 06:14 PM
 
Location: Sarasota Florida
1,236 posts, read 3,607,031 times
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Cool The Villages in central FL

I still hang out at The Villages (Florida) forum and it's a serious option if/when I ever relocate alone. I'm still favoring CA or FL,
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Old 03-29-2009, 02:40 PM
 
Location: Alaska
384 posts, read 877,249 times
Reputation: 186
Fifty fifty... I love your outlook .
"I just love the adventure of finding a new life." and " I'm ready for some new territory to explore and people to meet."

What a fun way to move through the world, and especially for the latter phases of life. For some reason, I have not qutie reached your inner freedom on this one...but perhaps new possibilities lie ahead within me...what a wonderful thought! For now, I still have the concern that no matter where I go I may want to come home ...and home for me is here where I have been for 29 years. It feels like falling off a cliff to walk away from that permanently.

As for 55+ communities - my parents enjoyed one for 25 years - for at least half of each year. I think, similar to a college campus, that living around one's age group allows for a certain freedom and comraderie. Likewise, it comes with some other interesting territory. Certainly, it was interesting to find that affairs of the heart (and body), petty bickering, jealousy, and the struggle for status continues even amongst that supposedly mature and wizened group. Apparently, the push and pull of one's character and ego transcends any age group.

I spent some extended time at my parents community, and I rather enjoyed the lifestyle even in my 30's at that time. It is phenomenal to take a walk in good weather almost every day, to have a pool down the street, regular potlucks to socialize at, dances to go to, people to wave at and say a quick hello to as you sit on your lanai, and the action of others coming and going in your home - drop in visits, dinners, coffee, and games if you wish.

I'm pretty sure a 55+ community is in my future in some manner... it is just hard for me to believe that I am already there! My parents were two generations older than me ... so I grew up reading Modern Maturity and AARP around the house ... it is stunning that now I'm reading it again but for me! Plus, I don't feel like there has been a space between their retirement and mine ... since my mother is still around in her mid 90's . We sold their Florida retirement place about four years ago ... and now here I am looking for one!




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Old 03-29-2009, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Alaska
384 posts, read 877,249 times
Reputation: 186
NancytheReader - I believe that Solivita is a 55+ community near Orlando, FL

AVATAR Homes - Official Solivita - Florida’s Award-winning active adult new community for adults 55 or better
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Old 03-29-2009, 04:31 PM
 
189 posts, read 637,551 times
Reputation: 196
Default Moving Around

Quote:
Originally Posted by miruca View Post
Fifty fifty... I love your outlook .
"I just love the adventure of finding a new life." and " I'm ready for some new territory to explore and people to meet."

What a fun way to move through the world, and especially for the latter phases of life. For some reason, I have not qutie reached your inner freedom on this one...but perhaps new possibilities lie ahead within me...what a wonderful thought! For now, I still have the concern that no matter where I go I may want to come home ...and home for me is here where I have been for 29 years. It feels like falling off a cliff to walk away from that permanently.

As for 55+ communities - my parents enjoyed one for 25 years - for at least half of each year. I think, similar to a college campus, that living around one's age group allows for a certain freedom and comraderie. Likewise, it comes with some other interesting territory. Certainly, it was interesting to find that affairs of the heart (and body), petty bickering, jealousy, and the struggle for status continues even amongst that supposedly mature and wizened group. Apparently, the push and pull of one's character and ego transcends any age group.

I spent some extended time at my parents community, and I rather enjoyed the lifestyle even in my 30's at that time. It is phenomenal to take a walk in good weather almost every day, to have a pool down the street, regular potlucks to socialize at, dances to go to, people to wave at and say a quick hello to as you sit on your lanai, and the action of others coming and going in your home - drop in visits, dinners, coffee, and games if you wish.

I'm pretty sure a 55+ community is in my future in some manner... it is just hard for me to believe that I am already there! My parents were two generations older than me ... so I grew up reading Modern Maturity and AARP around the house ... it is stunning that now I'm reading it again but for me! Plus, I don't feel like there has been a space between their retirement and mine ... since my mother is still around in her mid 90's . We sold their Florida retirement place about four years ago ... and now here I am looking for one!



Miruca: thanks for the nice comments.

I heard it said once that some people who move to California from the East, thinking it is shangri-la, experience depression once they get there because they then are hit with the thought "what is there after this?" And that is why I wasn't thrilled with living in Sun City back in my early 50's. It just seemed like a place where retirees went to live out their remaining years -- and that was it -- nothing to look forward to because most people are timid about moving if they find themselves in an unhappy situation. Not me. The day I stop planning is the day I may as well hang it up.

Everybody's different. We all grew up around different ways of looking at life. Almost all of my Jersey relatives lived and died within 50 miles of where they were born. It depressed me to see that even as a little kid. It would kill me to never live anywhere else. I wish I had the time and money to live in every state, for at least a little while.

I don't know your exact circumstances or how much you love the place you are in right now. The thing is, if you do move away, you can always come back if it's just the town you miss. But if it's a connection for sentimental reasons to a house, then that's another problem because once it's sold, it's gone. A cousin of mine in NJ is 55 and has lived in the same house since she was 3 -- her Dad built it, so I guess she'd never sell it for that reason. Her two brothers, however, moved on many decades ago to Florida and stayed and made lives and raised families. Their sister never married. To each, his or her own.

If you're not sure, then I would just do some traveling around, seeing how the mood of lots of places hits you. Don't do anything hastily. I've made mistakes doing that very thing, so I'd advise others to take it easy and be as sure as it's possible to be before calling the realtor.

My parents moved to N. Ft. Myers in 1977 from a tiny rural town in north Jersey. They were very happy for a while. My mother died 3 years after their move, but my Dad stayed another 10 years. So like you, I'd visit them while in my 30's and thought it would be a great life. After 10 days in the sun during Christmas week, it was awful having to board the plane for the trip to the frozen north of Michigan. When I worked, EVERYTHING looked better than what I had. Since I've been retired, things aren't quite that glittery anymore. Freedom from being chained to a desk at a large company has given me maybe too much leeway -- I move around like some people buy cars every couple years. I tell people my hobby is moving. They laugh. Moving is a lot of work, but I think it's great fun.

Good luck to you in whatever you decide to do.
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Old 03-29-2009, 05:03 PM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
15,400 posts, read 25,817,519 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FiftyFiftyAboutCO View Post
I heard it said once that some people who move to California from the East, thinking it is shangri-la, experience depression once they get there because they then are hit with the thought "what is there after this?"
If you're prone to that kind of thinking, it will hit you no matter where you live.

And why wait until you retire to have depressing thoughts like that? You can drive yourself into a funk right this very minute if you want, just start thinking about how you only get one life to live and thus "what is there after this?"

I'm glad to hear you're resisting this sort of thinking. But I also think most other retirees resist it, as well. Whether they're living in retirement communities or not. Just my two cents, but I really don't think most people in retirement communities feel they have "nothing to look forward to." Not the people I know, anyway.
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Old 03-29-2009, 06:41 PM
 
189 posts, read 637,551 times
Reputation: 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by normie View Post
....Just my two cents, but I really don't think most people in retirement communities feel they have "nothing to look forward to." Not the people I know, anyway.
There are some very upbeat retired people. However, I've also met the other kind, and I think there are more of them than the other. One woman who lived across the street from me in Sun City TX would never open her shades/drapes, nor a window.....ever. She told me she liked her house locked up tight. Also, in the summertime, I'd drive around the streets there, and it was just dead. Same thing at the Sun City in Tucson when Dad lived there. I'm just saying it's not the rollicking "beer commercial" life lots of people think it is. If people don't have a life by the time they're ready to retire, they won't have one after. The happiest person I know is an 85-year old grandmother in Michigan. I met her when I was 20. She was happy then, and she's still bringing joy to everyone she meets.

Someone mentioned The Villages. I have friends there. From what they tell me, some of the regulations are what we've talked about on this thread -- ridiculous. Some of the neighborhoods make every homeowner have the same color Christmas lights every year -- clear. Also, it seems to me that unless you're into throwing big parties at your house and going to all the reciprocals, you'd be a fish out of water. This is a good case for renting before you leap, as another poster suggested.
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Old 04-04-2009, 03:09 PM
 
13,040 posts, read 15,382,569 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FiftyFiftyAboutCO View Post
There The happiest person I know is an 85-year old grandmother in Michigan. I met her when I was 20. She was happy then, and she's still bringing joy to everyone she meets.
Same with someone I know who will be 90 in July. She loves to be around people and they love to be about her. She laughs and jokes and if were talking to her and didn't see her/know her age, you'd never know you were talking to somebody that old. She doesn't act like an old person.
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Old 04-05-2009, 03:12 PM
 
29,764 posts, read 34,851,819 times
Reputation: 11675
Has anyone seen any studies on active 55 housing satisfaction broken down by age range? Wonder if the peak satisfaction years are 65ish to 75ish? I wonder if actually being retired heightens satisfaction etc.
There may be a profile of peak satisfaction based on criteria like age, employment status, marital status etc.
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Old 07-24-2009, 05:52 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
7,629 posts, read 14,374,443 times
Reputation: 18706
[quote=faithfulFrank;7699030]You might want to recheck that.
Most 55+ communities allow up to 30% of owners to be under 55...

Yes, do check out the guidelines for where you are looking to move.

We are in the process of buying in Del Webb Hill Country Retreat. They do have that a certain percentage under 55 (however, will be 55 in 4 short months) and we are THRILLED with our decision.

This particular subdivision has everything we want, we CAN have a fence for our dog (altho it must be the black wrought iron type) and it will only have 2,000 homes when built to completion (vs some of them that have LOTS more).

We are blessed in that we are only minutes from both of our jobs and will be able to continue to work while "enjoying the good life" and enjoyment of the community vs waiting until we retired. We were excited to hear that the "average" age at our development is 61 yrs young currently, and we have been to several functions and love the interactions and friendleness we have seen. This is as close to cruising atmosphere as we have found, and our love for cruising has probably moved this dream to fruitation.

Excited beyond belief right now...move in 4 short weeks from today!

Last edited by Paka; 07-24-2009 at 06:19 PM..
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