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Old 09-17-2017, 06:11 PM
 
Location: DFW - Coppell / Las Colinas
32,016 posts, read 36,629,245 times
Reputation: 38635

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post


Now all of a sudden, at the moment of retirement, that official "place" as a contributing member of society evaporates. We still have an identity as an individual, of course; we have knowledge, interests, and ways of finding joy in life. But something very important and very central is indeed missing.


That takes an adjustment for many folks (notice I didn't say for all folks), so that need for an adjustment is what I hear the OP writing about.
I believe the OP used the term guilt but really means what you just described. Most of us here were raised to work and contribute to society. I can see that someone after 40-50 years of work would have that feeling of loss.

Hopefully people with that guilt can have the income to do volunteer work and still feel useful if they so desire.
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Old 09-17-2017, 07:37 PM
 
Location: Central Illinois -
21,559 posts, read 14,358,004 times
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Why would anyone feel "guilty" for not working when they are 62 years old? That part I don't understand. It makes no difference what your work ethic is, you've reached the age of retirement. What then hell is there to feel guilty about?
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Old 09-17-2017, 07:43 PM
 
Location: New Oxford, PA
120 posts, read 59,132 times
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I put the required 25 years into my civil service career, and stepped aside so someone else could reap the same great benefits that I did. No retirement guilt at all.
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Old 09-17-2017, 08:11 PM
 
10,817 posts, read 8,061,664 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost Guy View Post
I put the required 25 years into my civil service career, and stepped aside so someone else could reap the same great benefits that I did. No retirement guilt at all.
I retired from a dream position at a time when many in my profession were seeking work.

Also I was never good at juggling work/family responsibilities and I'm a better wife, sister, mother, daughter-in-law, aunt, and neighbor since retiring.
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Old 09-17-2017, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Planet Woof
3,139 posts, read 3,507,801 times
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No guilt, no way. Retired at 62 this year and feel that though I live on a small income, I worked and paid in for every penny. Enjoy it!
You will find other things to do with your time and energy, some of which might involve drawing income part-time or not. Just remember, this is ''your time''. You worked hard for it and it is yours to do what you want.
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Old 09-17-2017, 08:46 PM
 
Location: S.W. Florida
2,209 posts, read 931,839 times
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Eleven months into retirement and I'm still trying to figure it out. For the life of me I don't understand what's wrong with me. One day I enjoy being retired and all of the freedoms that come with it, then I get in a funk and feel like I should have never retired. Physically I was spent, stressed to the max. Mentally however, I was not prepared for the feeling of uselessness I frequently feel.

My wife tells me I've done my time,that a 45 year work career is enough,that's it's time to enjoy our life now and take it easy. The problem is I've never taken it easy, nor have I ever had a position where I did not have a lot of responsibility. Maybe this is why some people go back to work or never retire in the first place? I'm just hoping that sooner rather than later I will find some purpose in this phase of life.
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Old 09-17-2017, 09:13 PM
 
6,253 posts, read 4,728,813 times
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Enjoying life and taking it easy should not be considered as synonymous.
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Old 09-17-2017, 09:20 PM
 
5,426 posts, read 3,448,244 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post

Enjoying life and taking it easy should not be considered as synonymous.
interesting and excellent point, jrkliny!!

It doesn't apply to me, but I definitely think it's an important practice, idea, axiom, and guideline for many in retirement.
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Old 09-17-2017, 09:55 PM
 
Location: Pac. NW
2,021 posts, read 1,522,145 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I, too, feel that I have earned my retirement, and then some. During 34 years I put up with lots of stress and b.s. from various idiotic supervisors. (They weren't all idiotic, of course.) And I worked part-time for a number of years before beginning that 34-year stretch which earned me a pension. Probably about 41 years in the workforce all together - not as much as a lot of folks, I know, but enough to have earned my retirement without feeling guilty.


Yet I understand where the OP is coming from. Unless we are staying home raising children - a high, noble, and important calling for sure - we spend decades feeling that we are a contributing member of society by working and by paying taxes in that way, and by the actual job we are doing quite apart from the monetary aspects. After all, the job is a part of society if someone considers it important enough to pay us for doing it.


Now all of a sudden, at the moment of retirement, that official "place" as a contributing member of society evaporates. We still have an identity as an individual, of course; we have knowledge, interests, and ways of finding joy in life. But something very important and very central is indeed missing.


That takes an adjustment for many folks (notice I didn't say for all folks), so that need for an adjustment is what I hear the OP writing about.
There is something about not contributing that makes me feel like spare gear that could be thrown overboard at any time.
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Old 09-17-2017, 10:57 PM
 
1,440 posts, read 722,775 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommy64 View Post
There is something about not contributing that makes me feel like spare gear that could be thrown overboard at any time.
Well.....as anyone who has worked & spent most of their lives at a career only to be pushed out or let go due to "corporate downsizing" , reorganization, takeovers, economic bottom lines, etc. most people are only a gear or cog in the machine. And once that cog gets worn out, used up or too expensive to keep/replace it's tossed out in favor of a cheaper one or not replaced at all.
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