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Old 09-17-2017, 05:24 AM
 
Location: Knoxville, TN
1,277 posts, read 597,982 times
Reputation: 2809

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As I near retirement, I am very excited about it, but also fearful that I am going to feel guilty not working. I plan to retire next year at age 61 1/2. I have been careful, financially, which will enable me to live a modest, but comfortable life....which is what I have always done. But my parents always drilled a work ethic into me....work and save, work and save. How do others deal with the guilt of waking up on a Monday and not going to work along with everyone else? Does it dissipate over time? Did you not feel as guilty as you thought you might? I don't plan to sit in front of the TV eating bonbons. My plans are to exercise and be active in my new community.....but not pursuing a paycheck.....I am worried about how that will make me feel.

Mod cut.

Last edited by PJSaturn; 09-19-2017 at 08:47 AM.. Reason: Political commentary.
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Old 09-17-2017, 05:40 AM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,800 posts, read 4,856,396 times
Reputation: 6379
You will feel liberated. You will be able to pursue your dreams and desires. Volunteer to your hearts content. Enjoy the freedom of not having to punch a clock every day. Give yourself time to adjust to your new freedoms.
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Old 09-17-2017, 05:41 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
16,375 posts, read 10,361,162 times
Reputation: 28593
I never felt guilty, just relieved.


all that work and save, work and save... ok. did the work. Retirement was what the saving is for.

enjoy
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Old 09-17-2017, 05:59 AM
 
1,065 posts, read 492,491 times
Reputation: 4061
I did experience some of the feelings you describe and they do dissipate over time. What helped me alot was the establishment of a schedule, where I get up every morning and do my fun exercise routine. Then my chores, then the variables that change from day to day. I am really surprised by how busy I am. And I look forward to the one day a week where I lol about in bed and read and drink coffee, just like when I was working.


I will say that part of the reason I am busy is bc I do things more slowly. No need to rush, which is great. Slow living allows me to enjoy even mundane tasks.


I know what you mean about a hyper developed work ethic. I think it is the actual daily routine that accommodates that need for me. Makes me feel productive, which is good, and the productivity I'm accomplishing is for me, and for others, but not for "da man"


Hope this is helpful. Enjoy the anticipation, it's part of the fun.

Last edited by LilyMae521; 09-17-2017 at 06:25 AM..
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Old 09-17-2017, 07:46 AM
 
2,215 posts, read 745,171 times
Reputation: 1376
if you feel guilty then go out and get yourself a p/t job or do substitute teaching in your local school.
When the guilt wears off then you can leave.
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Old 09-17-2017, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Sylmar, a part of Los Angeles
4,002 posts, read 2,552,498 times
Reputation: 8571
Are you kidding? I took to retirement like a duck to water. I didn't dislike my job, machinist, but it's sure nice not to go to work.
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Old 09-17-2017, 08:47 AM
 
3,604 posts, read 1,649,463 times
Reputation: 13549
If you feel guilty then get a part time job or volunteer work. Really to destroy your potential with guilt is a terrible burden to put on yourself.
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Old 09-17-2017, 08:58 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,707 posts, read 33,724,405 times
Reputation: 51976
Quote:
Originally Posted by JOinGA View Post
As I near retirement, I am very excited about it, but also fearful that I am going to feel guilty not working. I plan to retire next year at age 61 1/2. I have been careful, financially, which will enable me to live a modest, but comfortable life....which is what I have always done. But my parents always drilled a work ethic into me....work and save, work and save. How do others deal with the guilt of waking up on a Monday and not going to work along with everyone else? Does it dissipate over time? Did you not feel as guilty as you thought you might? I don't plan to sit in front of the TV eating bonbons. My plans are to exercise and be active in my new community.....but not pursuing a paycheck.....I am worried about how that will make me feel.

I do want to throw in that I am politically very liberal for all of those under the impression that liberals don't work and spend their lives looking for a free ride.
You won't change in retirement. All of your good and bad habits you will keep. If you didn't exercise before, eat bon bons in front of the TV before or be active in your community before, you won't be doing those things after you retire, either, despite your intentions. If you did do those things, you'll still do them only with more time flexibility. That's my opinion based on experience. The only difference is by not working, it may have a different effect on you. In my case, I never realized how much exercise was involved daily in just going to work (walking to the train station or walking in from the parking lot, walking between buildings for meetings multiple times per day, walking up and down stairs, walking to the cafeteria for lunch (in another building, etc.). Walking for the sake of walking just didn't appeal to me after I retired. If you were a procrastinator at work, you'll still be a procrastinator in retirement. If you were a volunteer, you'll find a way to volunteer. If you liked to read, you'll still read. If you patted yourself on the back for your political views, you'll still do it in retirement. If you were a spendaholic, you'll still be one in retirement...but without the same money...which could make you worried, I suppose.

Guess what I'm saying is, don't expect to be reborn in retirement. You're still you. The money thing may make you worried/resentful/sad if you can't be you anymore. Health issues may also make you worried/sad/resentful if you can't be you anymore. Just my opinion. Never felt guilty, just surprised.
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Old 09-17-2017, 09:11 AM
 
6,312 posts, read 4,757,627 times
Reputation: 12955
Retirement brings all new experiences and opportunities. Now is the time to decide on new goals for learning, personal growth and accomplishments.
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Old 09-17-2017, 09:13 AM
 
6,312 posts, read 4,757,627 times
Reputation: 12955
Reading the post #8 above makes me add the idea that one should plan to use retirement as an opportunity to be reborn.
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