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Old 10-07-2017, 04:53 PM
 
1,284 posts, read 584,042 times
Reputation: 2379

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Quote:
Originally Posted by madrone2k View Post
I know that not everyone is financially ready to retire young, but what do people here think about this notion?
I think it is true. Retirement after a long time working is a major adjustment. That obviously is going to disrupt things right at the time you are least able. You need to set up retirement and just... stay stable as you get older.
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Old 10-07-2017, 05:36 PM
 
Location: Tampa, FL
27,798 posts, read 26,302,089 times
Reputation: 14611
Quote:
Originally Posted by chronic65 View Post
The title of this thread, immediately brought to mind my beloved father. He began working for his father at the ripe age of 5 or 6 driving a team of horses, working the fields, later, as a teen hired on to help build roads, furnishing his own horse and getting paid a dollar a day. After that worked for a man driving trucks and serving the public, long hours and physically demanding. Bought into the business at some point and when I was about 10 or 11 I began to work with him and realized how hard he worked, how long he worked and I kind of felt like it was just too much. I used kind of badger him to spend more time with me, go fishing, don't work so hard etc. He would always tell me that he did it so I wouldn't have to. His youth and early adulthood was during the depression and the dirty thirties and I know that shaped his thinking. He knew that hard times could come at a blink of an eye. Anyway, he kept working, finally decided to sell his share of the business at 65, kept working there, helping out, then suddenly a major heart attack and death. That was almost 40 years ago he died at 67. I retired at 65 and am now 70. No one will accuse me of working near as hard as my father did. I don't know what the point of all this is, but, I miss my father and mother.
interesting post
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Old 10-07-2017, 06:13 PM
 
Location: Houston
1,151 posts, read 957,368 times
Reputation: 1291
Thanks for posting that, since I missed chronic65's original post. His/her story reminds me of my dad's, although perhaps my own dad was more fortunate. Born in 1919, died in 2005, and I think had a good life. But ... my mom preceeded him in death by 2 years, and that was a blow he could not recover from. I will stop here, since I want to honor chronic65's thoughts. I really miss my mom and dad, too.
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Old 10-07-2017, 06:41 PM
 
1,135 posts, read 608,680 times
Reputation: 4071
Quote:
Originally Posted by macnyc2003 View Post
It's not just people in New York doing this. Unless you inherit a lot of money or marry up, you need to work for a living, no matter where you live.
Or you can be frugal, invest, and live comfortably.

Those who choose to live the paycheck-to-paycheck route will end up with few options, especially so the longer they wait to start saving.
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Old 10-07-2017, 07:53 PM
 
Location: Lincoln, CA (Sacramento Area)
9 posts, read 5,966 times
Reputation: 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by madrone2k View Post
I want to comment without having read through all of the 12 pages of posts, so I apologize I'm if repeating something that someone has already said.

I'm recently retired, but the topic reminds me of conversations I had with older co-workers back in the 90s. One in particular used to cite a statistical study that (supposedly) was based on employees of IBM, which obviously would be a large data set.

The take-away message was that people who waited too late to retire tended to die sooner after retiring. The presumed reason was that such people were less able to readjust their lives. People who retired younger still had the flexibility to adapt and therefore lived longer.

I know that not everyone is financially ready to retire young, but what do people here think about this notion?
I think that is true, reminds me of the movie Shawshank Redemption and Brooks, you do one thing long enough you become "Institutionalized"
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Old 10-07-2017, 08:30 PM
 
3,327 posts, read 3,518,533 times
Reputation: 2843
Quote:
Originally Posted by Airborneguy View Post
Man you really hate me lol.

As I always say now: go back and find when I bothered to type a full reponse to you and respond to it. Not wasting time with your nonsense again. Iím sure Iíll be enjoying my sick retirement long before you answer me so why bother?
Relax, it's just a message board. Although your hypocrisy and cognitive dissonance is astounding.

A lifetime government employee talking about leftism.
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Old 10-07-2017, 09:42 PM
 
26,199 posts, read 28,621,585 times
Reputation: 24927
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacksnacknyc View Post
So is everyone in NYC okay with slaving for other people and retiring at an old age and then dying?
It honestly doesn't make any sense to me...
why is life set up this way? It's a system I know but... don't we all wanna stay away from the system?
Thoughts on this?
People like to complain but they don't want to do anything differently. It takes effort to go against the grain. You have to be willing to to take ridicule, etc. It's easier in the short run to go along with the herd and then insist there wasn't any other way. In short, people don't want to get out of the matrix bad enough.
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Old 10-07-2017, 09:44 PM
 
26,199 posts, read 28,621,585 times
Reputation: 24927
Quote:
Originally Posted by Principle Lewis View Post
Seriously.

I actually enjoy working. We live in a society, and itís great to have a purpose in life. People that work later in life tend to live longer as well.
I think people conflate working for money with having a purpose in life. One doesn't have to work for money to have a sense of purpose. The problem is many people are programmed to believe that working for money is the only way in which one can have a sense of purpose.
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Old 10-07-2017, 09:45 PM
 
26,199 posts, read 28,621,585 times
Reputation: 24927
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonaldJTrump View Post
i hear all the time of people retiring and then kick the bucket soon after

so the lesson is dont retire or else you die
No. The lesson is to always have a sense of purpose whether you're being paid or not. A sense of purpose independent of paid employment is a good and healthy thing and should be developed long before one leaves paid employment.
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Old 10-07-2017, 09:48 PM
 
26,199 posts, read 28,621,585 times
Reputation: 24927
Quote:
Originally Posted by kapikap View Post
People just like routine. Slaving all day, like a typical american, fully retire when ss kicks in full, at 67 years of age.

But i would suggest you put all that money away, invest, and retire at 62, and wave your middle finger at the world, while you retire early.
It can happen earlier than 62 for those who start young, earn above average incomes, and are focused on saving a high percentage of income:

The Shockingly Simple Math Behind Early Retirement

Last edited by mysticaltyger; 10-07-2017 at 11:07 PM..
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