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Old 10-14-2017, 10:05 AM
 
Location: Sylmar, a part of Los Angeles
3,978 posts, read 2,537,158 times
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I liked being a machinist but probably the last 5 years I was dead tired most of the time after work. So I happily retired at 62 and still pursue hobbies for 12 years now.
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Old 10-14-2017, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Yavapai County
746 posts, read 481,954 times
Reputation: 928
Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
Money is part of the matrix of control. As long as I am dependent on a job and money, I might as well make the most of it...but it's good to take a step back and see money for what it really is.
Ha! I like that phrasing. I'm working on breaking out of the matrix, but it isn't easy!
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Old 10-14-2017, 11:08 AM
 
2,035 posts, read 859,539 times
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Even though I had prepared and planned for retirement it was scary. But I told myself, if I'm scared to retire now, I'll be terrified to retire in the future. So I pulled the plug. None of my worries about retirement materialized.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kefir King View Post
...

Looking back, it proved to be the right decision, even if pretty scary back then.
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Old 10-14-2017, 12:25 PM
 
Location: Yavapai County
746 posts, read 481,954 times
Reputation: 928
Quote:
Originally Posted by ocnjgirl View Post
No one said you need to wait until you retire to enjoy life. Maybe you're in the wrong job. I wish I didn't have to work, but I sought a career with flexibility and I'm not waiting for anything to have fun and enjoy my life. I will never be able to retire, and have genetics that already have me in pain from arthritis, but that's all the more reason to have fun.

OP would you honestly be happy for the rest of your life if you just woke up and had no where you had to go, nothing you had to do? What would you be doing with your life if you had someone paying your rent and bills from tomorrow on? What would you do tomorrow and the next day and 6 months from now? What ever the answer to that is, maybe is what you should seek a career in.

When I was in my late teens, early 20's and working crap jobs, I used to try to go on unemployment for the summer. I liked being able to sleep late, etc, but in reality I had no structure , stayed in bed too much, watched too much TV, and didn't enjoy it as much as I thought I would (I was off but all my friends were at work) and invariably, when I started working again, my grandmother would always comment "You look so much happier when you're working".
Interesting story! Just curious what your career is...only if you care to share.
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Old 10-14-2017, 01:11 PM
 
Location: Yavapai County
746 posts, read 481,954 times
Reputation: 928
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Nail hit squarely on the head. I wonder if all the posters telling those stories even realize how meaningless they are. By following the news we could all come up with a story about someone who dropped dead at age 50. Does that mean no one should work past age 50? It's so ludicrous.
No, I don't think it is ludicrous at all. It really depends on the individual and how you want to live your life. My Dad died at 67, very unexpectedly. He was in great health, but got cancer that took his life in a little over a year. Thankfully, he had retired at 57, so had some time to enjoy things other than working.

Does that mean I won't live a long life? No, not at all. It means I don't want to take the chance. I would rather have freedom to do what I want than to be tied to a job. So, my DH and I (who feels the same) are living very frugally so that we can retire in our mid-fifties. We will have to live a frugal life in retirement too, but we agree that it is worth it.

I think individuals that are motivated by the "retire and then die" anecdotes are probably people that really want to retire as early as they can anyway. At least that is true for me. I don't *need* to hear about people not having much retired time before they die, but it does tend to reinforce my desire to retire asap. Perhaps if I really loved my job, that would be different. The things I like to do aren't things that usually pay a livable wage though.
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Old 10-14-2017, 01:25 PM
 
Location: Yavapai County
746 posts, read 481,954 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kefir King View Post
I hated every job I ever had from age 17 (nights and weekends after school) to corporate executive. Hauling myself to work every day was hateful. I retired very early because the alternative seemed to be only suicide. Every day was the same counting the minutes until I could get home...or to a bar. Even Sunday was ruined for me because I knew that it was followed by Monday.


My first retired act was to throw out my alarm clock.


Looking back, it proved to be the right decision, even if pretty scary back then.
Good to hear you are still alive!
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Old 10-14-2017, 01:26 PM
 
20,545 posts, read 16,611,821 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbuglf View Post
Interesting story! Just curious what your career is...only if you care to share.
I'm an occupational therapist and work in nursing homes. I think that gives me a bit of a different perspective than many, in that I refuse to wait for retirement to enjoy my life, because you never know if you're going to make it that far, and that I am far more grateful for the little things than most, which keeps me grounded in what I start whining about in my life. For instance just being able to get out of bed and walk to the bathroom whenever I want to, just being able to change the thermostat to whatever I want it to be, those things are eventually taken away from many of us, and they are the things we will miss, simple control over our every day lives, not the vacations. There's not a singe day I don't leave and feel grateful while walking out to a life of purpose, past all the residents sitting in their wheelchairs. I find Kefer King's post rather sad, as it sounds like a lot of wasted years spent being miserable. They go by fast.

Aside from that, although I hate getting up early and always will, I like being around elderly people, they're funny, as the filters are often long ago off, and they also have very interesting stories and viewpoints, like the gentleman whose entire family was killed in the Holocaust, he was only spared because he was young and strong and could work, and after the war, he joined an underground group of Nazi hunters and spent time in jail due to it. This man I want to point out, always had a smile on his face. If he can go through all that and still smile at the world, I think I can manage getting up while I'm still sleepy without letting it make me feel resentful about life.

On my very first job after I graduated, we had a patient come in who had suffered a very severe stroke. He was only in his 60's. His wife told us he had been an executive at a big company, and that he had just retired a few weeks earlier. His life was spent primarily working, and saving leisure time and travel for retirement. So he and his wife had booked a several month long European vacation, and it was on the way to the airport that he suffered his stroke. The man passed less than 2 weeks later.

That left a significant impression on me. So I try to strike a balance between being responsible and saving, but also enjoying life, doing things like taking a Tuesday off so I can stay up late with my friends watching the Eagles on Monday Night Football, or for a long weekend to drive up north with my Honey to see the fall leaves.







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Old 10-14-2017, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Yavapai County
746 posts, read 481,954 times
Reputation: 928
What an excellent post, ocnjgirl! You have a great attitude.

My Mom had to spend some time recently in an assisted living facility after a fall, so I have some understanding of what you describe. I'm sure you are a blessing to the seniors that you interact with.
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Old 10-15-2017, 09:33 AM
 
20,545 posts, read 16,611,821 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbuglf View Post
What an excellent post, ocnjgirl! You have a great attitude.

My Mom had to spend some time recently in an assisted living facility after a fall, so I have some understanding of what you describe. I'm sure you are a blessing to the seniors that you interact with.
Thank you for that lovely post!





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Old 10-15-2017, 11:07 AM
 
1,257 posts, read 287,773 times
Reputation: 1510
This is exactly what I am trying to avoid ... so I make a conscious effort to NOT let my job become the most important part of who I am. I think that's what invariably does people in, provided they are in otherwise good health.

Having said that, there are no guarantees. Make a plan, try to make good decisions, and hope your health holds out. That is the most important thing. I plan on retiring at 62 and spending some time relaxing and trying to defeat my genetic disposition.

Cheers and good luck.
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