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Old 10-15-2017, 03:17 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
5,371 posts, read 9,859,230 times
Reputation: 10243

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Like the OP, I, too, hated slaving away for someone else. So I learned my craft from them and then started my own business. Then I worked harder than ever, but as I was working for myself and really enjoyed what I did, it didn't feel like slavery.

My advice? Start a business in an area you enjoy--whether it's personal fitness trainer, pet sitter, Uber driver, chef, or whatever floats your boat. Surely you're passionate about something? Want to travel? Get work in the travel industry or join the service--and see the world...oh never mind, that's maybe not such a great idea.

Not everyone can happily work for someone else. I couldn't -- and didn't. Use your imagination...you can create a life you like living. Just stay out of debt.
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Old 10-17-2017, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Tampa, FL
27,798 posts, read 26,200,766 times
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https://www.facebook.com/TheIndepend...5350120651636/

interesting quick video from The Independent FP page "use your time wisely" - pretty much discusses what OP's post was critical of....
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Old 10-17-2017, 03:46 PM
 
5,425 posts, read 3,445,259 times
Reputation: 13698
Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleDolphin View Post
Like the OP, I, too, hated slaving away for someone else. So I learned my craft from them and then started my own business. Then I worked harder than ever, but as I was working for myself and really enjoyed what I did, it didn't feel like slavery.

My advice? Start a business in an area you enjoy--whether it's personal fitness trainer, pet sitter, Uber driver, chef, or whatever floats your boat. Surely you're passionate about something? Want to travel? Get work in the travel industry or join the service--and see the world...oh never mind, that's maybe not such a great idea.

Not everyone can happily work for someone else. I couldn't -- and didn't. Use your imagination...you can create a life you like living. Just stay out of debt.
I'm interested in what type of business you created, if you feel like saying.

As an aside, I don't think being a pet sitter or Uber driver would make a very good career.

And major parts of the travel industry have been decimated by the existence of the internet.

I don't think just 'using one's imagination' will even begin to create a viable living for the majority of people. For some, yes.
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Old 10-18-2017, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Gulf Coast
1,256 posts, read 541,525 times
Reputation: 1981
My dad just turned 66, he retired last year after 40 years working for the government. He has always been one of the hardest working men I know, always looking for something to do, ways to keep busy. But he's gone downhill since retirement, seems depressed and health has declined. It's sad to see.
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Old 10-18-2017, 03:14 PM
 
20,545 posts, read 16,611,821 times
Reputation: 38571
Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernProper View Post
My dad just turned 66, he retired last year after 40 years working for the government. He has always been one of the hardest working men I know, always looking for something to do, ways to keep busy. But he's gone downhill since retirement, seems depressed and health has declined. It's sad to see.
That happens a LOT, especially with men. Many men never had hobbies, just work and working around the house. While women, who were often caregivers, can get a sense of purpose through things like volunteering at a church thrift shop or otherwise helping people even in small ways, men (at least older generations) do not get the same sense of purpose from things like this. The loss of a sense of purpose to me is the biggest loss that those who go to an ALF, nursing home, even a swanky retirement community.


I once had a patient close to 90 who suffered 3rd degree burns and then fell off his roof while attempting to re-tar it himself! This man could afford to have someone do it, he just couldn't admit he wasn't able to anymore.
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Old 10-18-2017, 07:18 PM
 
13,317 posts, read 25,550,246 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matisse12 View Post
I don't think just 'using one's imagination' will even begin to create a viable living for the majority of people. For some, yes.
In my area(eastern Mass.) it helps to have a software husband or a doctor wife or some such.
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Old 10-19-2017, 08:13 AM
 
Location: NJ
972 posts, read 2,420,624 times
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I have never felt like I was "slaving" because I get paid. I am happy to have a job and will probably work as long as I am able.
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Old 10-20-2017, 08:22 PM
 
378 posts, read 226,641 times
Reputation: 991
I retired at 55 along with my wife. We worked at schools and we earned pensions and medical benefits until medicare. I have never doubted that my time is more important than having MORE money. I sleep in, go to the gym, walk, bike , nap, play with my wife and dog, cook my food and listen to music all day long. I avoid crowds and traffic. Life in this rhythm and flow is beautiful. No commitments, no rush, just peace and serenity. No politics, no religion, just an uncluttered mind. My goal was to have no commitments and be debt free. I have noticed that many people working or not working drink too much alcohol and consider that to be a good time. Addiction to booze and the EGO get real expensive.
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Old 10-20-2017, 09:35 PM
 
982 posts, read 144,443 times
Reputation: 658
Quote:
Originally Posted by slowdude222 View Post
I retired at 55 along with my wife. We worked at schools and we earned pensions and medical benefits until medicare. I have never doubted that my time is more important than having MORE money. I sleep in, go to the gym, walk, bike , nap, play with my wife and dog, cook my food and listen to music all day long. I avoid crowds and traffic. Life in this rhythm and flow is beautiful. No commitments, no rush, just peace and serenity. No politics, no religion, just an uncluttered mind. My goal was to have no commitments and be debt free. I have noticed that many people working or not working drink too much alcohol and consider that to be a good time. Addiction to booze and the EGO get real expensive.
I couldn't agree more! I've been asked by people my age or slightly younger, who seem to be desperate to always be busy to the point of being overwhelmed, what I plan to do in my retirement. What is my passion? What do I want to do? Blah blah. I get disdainful looks when my response is pretty much what you said. The OP attracted my attention because DH and I did grow up in the middle of the hustle and bustle of NYC, busted our butts for 40-odd years at jobs we liked marginally because they sustained us, learned life lessons along the way, and now are reaping the fruits of our labor, enjoying life and each other in a much more simple and laid back environment and lifestyle, hopefully for another 30+ years! And we're going to make things up as we go along.

Last edited by barb712; 10-20-2017 at 09:52 PM..
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Old 10-20-2017, 09:40 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,572 posts, read 17,544,804 times
Reputation: 27635
Quote:
Originally Posted by ocnjgirl View Post
That happens a LOT, especially with men. Many men never had hobbies, just work and working around the house. While women, who were often caregivers, can get a sense of purpose through things like volunteering at a church thrift shop or otherwise helping people even in small ways, men (at least older generations) do not get the same sense of purpose from things like this. The loss of a sense of purpose to me is the biggest loss that those who go to an ALF, nursing home, even a swanky retirement community.


I once had a patient close to 90 who suffered 3rd degree burns and then fell off his roof while attempting to re-tar it himself! This man could afford to have someone do it, he just couldn't admit he wasn't able to anymore.
This problem develops more from a lack of purpose than retirement per se. I've seen this myself in my own family. Many, many people need something to be accountable to, some sort of set schedule, in order to not go off the rails.
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