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Old 10-21-2017, 12:46 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,729,443 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
This problem develops more from a lack of purpose than retirement per se. I've seen this myself in my own family. Many, many people need something to be accountable to, some sort of set schedule, in order to not go off the rails.

Yes, many people do indeed need that "sense of purpose". And they normally get severely bashed in this Retirement Forum by the people who apparently do not need it.
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Old 10-23-2017, 02:20 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,560 posts, read 17,535,380 times
Reputation: 27607
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Yes, many people do indeed need that "sense of purpose". And they normally get severely bashed in this Retirement Forum by the people who apparently do not need it.
One of my best friends committed suicide four years. We were 27 at the time.

He was severely mentally ill for many years. He had no real structure to his days. There was no "getting up in the morning and needing to be somewhere or do something." One day rolled into the next for him. He had no one to be accountable to. I think the rudderlessness of it all contributed to his illnesses. Some sort of structure and someone/thing to hold him accountable might have kept him from really going off the rails.

I'm by no means saying that people without direction are all going to kill themselves, but that lack of structure, particularly in men used to showing up to work and punching a clock so to speak, can often manifest in negative ways in some people.
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Old 10-23-2017, 06:07 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
5,371 posts, read 9,859,230 times
Reputation: 10243
Quote:
Originally Posted by matisse12 View Post
I'm interested in what type of business you created, if you feel like saying.

As an aside, I don't think being a pet sitter or Uber driver would make a very good career.

And major parts of the travel industry have been decimated by the existence of the internet.

I don't think just 'using one's imagination' will even begin to create a viable living for the majority of people. For some, yes.
I don't mind saying. First, I worked for a PR firm, writing press releases, handling media relations. then I switched over to an advertising agency, writing copy and handling some accounts. Then I started my own marketing communications firm. After I "retired" from that, I was a free-lance copywriter, a free-lance journalist, and now, having once again, "flunked" retirement, I've started and run a two person (wife & husband) pet-sitting firm. We have more business then we can handle and have great clients of the two and four-footed variety. A true labor of love.

Also wrote a novel: Falling Through Time, about what life will be like for us in the year 2084. Contains a great dog character, of course!

Now working on a new book, non-fiction, about my pet-sitting adventures and what animals have taught me.

I enjoy challenges and have built my careers on doing an excellent job, "hard" work and delivering more than asked for. But as mentioned, when working for yourself, it hardly feels like work -- feels more like happy passion, if that makes sense.

My advice to anyone who does not flourish working for someone else, is to "catch fire' and go for it. Believe in yourself, and take pride in what you do. I wasn't born with a silver spoon in my mouth at all. Was the first in my family to go to college and worked my way through school. My degree in English was not that useful compared to something like computer programming or an MBA, but gave me a great grounding in my love of writing and communication. Follow your passion.
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Old 10-26-2017, 07:23 AM
 
Location: Manhattan
21,468 posts, read 28,335,583 times
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I have loved and appreciated every moment of my long, long retirement.
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Old 10-26-2017, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,767 posts, read 4,827,803 times
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I think it's just very individual how one deals with retirement. Some need more structure and relish having goals, and a feeling of purpose, and some enjoy the carefree, anything goes existence. Some wish to indulge in hobbies, sports, or travel. There's no right or wrong to it, just what makes you happy and meets your needs. Everybody's different and I wouldn't say that one way is better than another. We've worked a long time and earned the right to do whatever we want in retirement. It's just no one else's business.
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Old 10-26-2017, 10:14 AM
 
4,776 posts, read 6,605,705 times
Reputation: 6785
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheShadow View Post
I think it's just very individual how one deals with retirement. Some need more structure and relish having goals, and a feeling of purpose, and some enjoy the carefree, anything goes existence. Some wish to indulge in hobbies, sports, or travel. There's no right or wrong to it, just what makes you happy and meets your needs. Everybody's different and I wouldn't say that one way is better than another. We've worked a long time and earned the right to do whatever we want in retirement. It's just no one else's business.
Exactly.
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Old 10-26-2017, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Manhattan
21,468 posts, read 28,335,583 times
Reputation: 9749
I am my own man and have relished every second of my retirement in my early 30's.
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Old 10-27-2017, 08:04 AM
 
Location: On the road
5,922 posts, read 2,885,080 times
Reputation: 11331
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Yes, many people do indeed need that "sense of purpose". And they normally get severely bashed in this Retirement Forum by the people who apparently do not need it.
I agree that many do need a sense or purpose. My impression of negative reactions to this in the forum is when those who do need the structure/purpose imply that others will need it to or they'll become lonely, bored, unhealthy, watch TV all day, etc. as if they cannot fathom a mentally/physically healthy existence without it.

To each their own, people are different.
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Old 10-27-2017, 10:25 AM
 
20,534 posts, read 16,611,821 times
Reputation: 38560
Quote:
Originally Posted by lieqiang View Post
I agree that many do need a sense or purpose. My impression of negative reactions to this in the forum is when those who do need the structure/purpose imply that others will need it to or they'll become lonely, bored, unhealthy, watch TV all day, etc. as if they cannot fathom a mentally/physically healthy existence without it.

To each their own, people are different.
Retirement may not always be optional when you get older, and I'd imagine that makes a difference. If your eyesight got bad or you have some other issue where they tell you to retire, it is probably much harder to deal with than if you planned for and chose retirement at that time.
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Old 10-27-2017, 11:18 AM
 
Location: USA
1,815 posts, read 2,241,974 times
Reputation: 4139
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kefir King View Post
I am my own man and have relished every second of my retirement in my early 30's.



Having someone else support you is not retirement.
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