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Old 10-06-2017, 04:48 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
4,834 posts, read 4,949,965 times
Reputation: 17302

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OP: If you are "slaving away", you're in the wrong job. Find something you like and get good at it.

My story: I retired two years ago. I do enjoy having time for myself and I like not needing to work.

But I'll admit, sometimes I feel bored.

So I got a call last week from my former employer. They asked if I'd be willing to return part time for a project. I told them they would have to double my previous salary. They did!

This will likely be an interesting gig. I feel glad to be appreciated. And the contract works both ways. They can fire me or I can fire them at a moment's notice.

When you become good at something, you have a lot more bargaining power. You will in essence be working for yourself.
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Old 10-06-2017, 05:11 AM
 
Location: Mount Airy, Maryland
10,460 posts, read 5,924,770 times
Reputation: 16151
I'm not really understanding the OP's point. So we have to work to earn a living, then we retire (hopefully) and then we die. That's how life works. Are you suggesting we shouldn't have to work?
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Old 10-06-2017, 05:33 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia/South Jersey area
2,871 posts, read 1,402,350 times
Reputation: 10071
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveinMtAiry View Post
I'm not really understanding the OP's point. So we have to work to earn a living, then we retire (hopefully) and then we die. That's how life works. Are you suggesting we shouldn't have to work?
Hey Dave,
Would that be MtAiry pa?


Anyhoo, I kind of understand how op feels. In the last 4 years, I've experienced a lot of losses.

1) my husband of 30 years from cancer 55 years old
2) my baby brother from cancer 50
3) my best friend and college roommate from heart attack 55

Some times I do get mad and think, all the scraping and savings, all the sacrificing and what we drop dead before we even enjoy it??

Now it does suck when you have a job that you hate, been there, done that but some times one does have to do what one doesn't like. I've had really crappy jobs and the job I have now is OK but it's pays 90K a year. for me that's simply way to much to turn down.

One thing I've started to do is say "enough is enough". I'm retiring in 2 years at a little over 58. some of my choices have many here calling me foolish (not purchasing ltc insurance, have no plans to ever buy it) but I can only live my life the way I deem best.

Op,
personally I would start with a little re-evaluation. see what you really want out of life. I do have a relative who quit her job early and really lives a very "simple" life. she fully admits that no she will not be taking a lot of vacations or buying a luxury car but she's happy.
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Old 10-06-2017, 06:42 AM
 
13,891 posts, read 7,395,585 times
Reputation: 25379
Quote:
Originally Posted by eliza61nyc View Post
One thing I've started to do is say "enough is enough". I'm retiring in 2 years at a little over 58. some of my choices have many here calling me foolish (not purchasing ltc insurance, have no plans to ever buy it) but I can only live my life the way I deem best.
Only 13% of people over age 65 have long term care insurance. Most of those had public sector or union jobs where it came with the job. Me? My house is my long term care policy.

At age 59, I keep looking at my retirement math numbers. I'm not quite at "enough is enough" yet. I'd have to give up some lifestyle things I'd prefer to keep doing.
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Old 10-06-2017, 07:00 AM
 
Location: New Oxford, PA
120 posts, read 59,121 times
Reputation: 464
Quote:
Originally Posted by BucFan View Post
47 here. Worked in healthcare and saw too many hard working individuals die in their 40s, 50s, 60s and told myself to get to retirement as soon as I hit financial critical mass*. That was eight years ago. Haven't had a boring day yet. Haven't regretted the decision whatsoever.

-----------------

*Critical Mass:

A state of freedom from worry and anxiety about money due to the accumulation of assets which make it possible to live your life as you choose without working if you prefer not to work or just working because you enjoy your work but don't need the income. Plainly stated, the Land of Critical Mass is a place in which individuals enjoy their own personal financial nirvana. Differentiation between earned income and assets is a fundamental lesson to learn when thinking in terms of critical mass. Earned income does not produce critical mass......critical mass is strictly a function of assets. Bob Brinker's Land of Critical Mass : bobbrinker.com Marketimer Moneytalk Bob Brinker
I'm glad to read this. I retired less than 2 years ago at age 46. I always figured that I could get another job if boredom became a factor. Happy to report, that I haven't become that bored, yet.
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Old 10-06-2017, 07:08 AM
 
948 posts, read 440,492 times
Reputation: 1561
To me, retiring doesn't mean sleeping til noon and sitting on my front porch in a rocking chair until the day I die, relieved that I finally don't have to work anymore.

Being retired to me means that I no longer have to worry about money, that I'm financially set for life and have the financial freedom to do whatever I want for the rest of my life. I'm not about to just sit around and waste away waiting to die as some retired people do. I planning on doing work that I enjoy until the day I die. I want to "die with my boots on" as my grandfather would say.

Totally agree with people who've observed the decline in people once they retire. They no longer feel like they have a purpose in life, no reason to get up in the morning, so they start focusing on the negatives in their lives. Health problems soon start to crop up, next thing you know they're either in a nursing home or dead. Whereas the people who kept busy even in retirement are still going strong well into their 80's and 90's.
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Old 10-06-2017, 07:34 AM
 
10,322 posts, read 9,374,600 times
Reputation: 15915
Never felt like a slave during my years of working; had jobs I didn't care for but I was the one who applied for the jobs and it was my choice to stay or find other employment.

Have heard of a few who passed away within a few years after retiring, but the majority live well into their 90s. It's just that we talk more about the ones who die than talking about the many who don't.
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Old 10-06-2017, 08:07 AM
 
5,823 posts, read 10,152,124 times
Reputation: 4531
When you become good at something, you have a lot more bargaining power. You will in essence be working for yourself.


That wouldn't work out for me because I never was good at anything. I mean sufficiently good that my former employer would re-hire me after I am pensioned off. My skills are average, so I can easily be replaced. I hope that I'll be successful in enjoying my retirement though. I have at least a quality : the "zen attitude" (contemplative skill?). I can spend a long time doing nothing (or next to nothing) without getting bored. I'm sure that will help me when I'm retired!


[RIGHT]
[/RIGHT]
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Old 10-06-2017, 08:09 AM
 
1 posts, read 489 times
Reputation: 12
Retirement is a man made concept that only means for most, "to be prepared when you are elderly to provide for yourself"
That is only part of the definition for most
Resources are required to exist. It seems we fair better working anyhow

[url=http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/early-retirement-may-be-the-kiss-of-death-study-finds_us_57221aa3e4b01a5ebde49eff]Early Retirement May Be The Kiss Of Death, Study Finds | HuffPost[/url]

The idea that there is a set age when we quit working has no merit either.
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Old 10-06-2017, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Tampa, FL
27,798 posts, read 26,205,335 times
Reputation: 14611
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveinMtAiry View Post
I'm not really understanding the OP's point. So we have to work to earn a living, then we retire (hopefully) and then we die. That's how life works. Are you suggesting we shouldn't have to work?
Perhaps he's pointing out a need to find balance in one's working years instead of working like a dog anticipating a retirement and not ever getting to that golden ring.
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