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Old 10-10-2017, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Center City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cabound1 View Post
I’m going to Boston, mostly because it feels like home and I can afford it. Philly would be second on my list if I couldn’t afford Boston.
Boston was our second choice. We considered Boston but the COL is much cheaper in Philly. Philly also offers more “big city”amenities. I’ve heard Boston described as a “boutique city,” which I think is a pretty descriptive appellation. Winters didn’t deter us, but for many, the fact that they are less intense in Philadelphia is a plus.

Best of luck in getting settled back in the northeast.
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Old 10-10-2017, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Center City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by madrone2k View Post
I hear you. Having been born in Houston, perhaps having my childhood here prepared me a bit more for the climate and bugs, etc. Actually, living in a mid-rise condo building here, I have no bugs at all, not even mosquitos on my balcony. But ... I admit that I am tired of the seemingly endless hot, humid summers. They didn't both me so much when I was working in refrigerated office buildings, but now that I am retired, I have time to be outside during the day and they do.

Coincidentally, my mom finished high school in Philadelphia after growing up in the Bethesda/Chevy Chase area. She's gone now, so I can't ask her how she liked it. I have visited there briefly and actually have a physician friend in Delaware, which seems nice ... but maybe a bit too quiet for me, I dunno.
I have always loved being outside, hence Houston’s climate wasn’t appealing for me. Now in Philadelphia, I’m out pretty much all year, with the exception of any hot humid spells in the summer - go figure. I can tell you that even on the worst summer days, evenings here tend to be comfortable enough to head back outdoors, unlike in Houston. As one Houstonian to another, I’ll bet you can understand just how wonderful that is for us.

As for Delaware, I grew up in southern Delaware and have lived in both the north and south regions of the state (yes, there is a difference). You are right in your instincts that it is “quiet.” Many people do retire to the beach resorts in Sussex County, but if you are seeking a more urban life, you won’t find it in Delaware. As a couple who enjoy urban amenities, Delaware never crossed our mind as an option for retirement.

Best if luck as you mull all of this over!
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Old 10-10-2017, 09:54 AM
 
1,093 posts, read 527,615 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
Philly is fantastic. It surprised the hell out of use when we came to visit, so much so since we obviously moved here. The last time I had been here in the 1980s, it was pretty rough. Now, the downtown and other gentrified neighborhoods are abuzz with restaurants, shopping and entertainment. We walk pretty much everywhere, sometimes using the car only once a week when I drive to a nursing home where I volunteer.

Taxes are a great deal for retirees. Pensions (public and private), along with Social Security, IRA withdrawals and 401(k) withdrawals are not taxed. That pretty much covers income sources for most retirees. Food, clothing, along with pharmaceuticals and medical supplies (both prescription and OTC) are exempt from sales tax. To sweeten the deal, people over 65 are able to ride public transit for free.
What are the property taxes like? In Boston, they are relatively low for the northeast and more importantly, capped by 2% increase yearly, I believe.
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Old 10-10-2017, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Center City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cabound1 View Post
What are the property taxes like? In Boston, they are relatively low for the northeast and more importantly, capped by 2% increase yearly, I believe.
We have tax abatement where we live for another couple of years, so we’ve been paying under $500/year. Once that expires, I understand they run just under 1.4%. This compares favorably with Houston, where property tax rates run around 2.3%.

Last edited by Pine to Vine; 10-10-2017 at 01:49 PM.. Reason: Typo
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Old 10-10-2017, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Location: Happy Place
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Fort Worth would be a great city for retirement!
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Old 10-10-2017, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Center City
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Originally Posted by mschrief View Post
Fort Worth would be a great city for retirement!
Why is that?
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Old 10-10-2017, 02:59 PM
 
1,093 posts, read 527,615 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
We have tax abatement where we live for another couple of years, so we’ve been paying under $500/year. Once that expires, I understand they run just under 1.4%. This compares favorably with Houston, where property tax rates run around 2.3%.
You are in Center City?

So 1.4% of assessed? Or sales price? Why are you on abatement? That’s nothing for taxes...
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Old 10-10-2017, 03:59 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,722 posts, read 49,538,109 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
... Taxes are a great deal for retirees. Pensions (public and private), along with Social Security, IRA withdrawals and 401(k) withdrawals are not taxed. That pretty much covers income sources for most retirees. Food, clothing, along with pharmaceuticals and medical supplies (both prescription and OTC) are exempt from sales tax. To sweeten the deal, people over 65 are able to ride public transit for free.
That sounds great, but then I have to ask why isn't it the oldest city? Or located in the oldest state?

What is the Average Age of the Residents in Each State? -Gallery

PA has a median age of 40.30

It sounds like retirees should be flocking there.

Instead retirees flock to the older states.
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Old 10-10-2017, 05:08 PM
 
Location: Center City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cabound1 View Post
You are in Center City?

So 1.4% of assessed? Or sales price? Why are you on abatement? Thatís nothing for taxes...
Yes, Iím in Center City. Philly offers a 10 year tax abatement to spur new development in the city. At the end ogpf 10 years, properties are taxed at 1.4% of their assessed value. Our assessment pretty much mirrors the purchase price.

I donít know whether taxes will rise directly from a few hundred dollars to the full 1.4% or will be phased in over time. Weíre budgeted for a big jump, but under current tax rules, that would be deductible. We will have that answer in the next year or two.
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Old 10-10-2017, 05:13 PM
 
1,093 posts, read 527,615 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
Yes, Iím in Center City. Philly offers a 10 year tax abatement to spur new development in the city. At the end ogpf 10 years, properties are taxed at 1.4% of their assessed value. Our assessment pretty much mirrors the purchase price.

I donít know whether taxes will rise directly from a few hundred dollars to the full 1.4% or will be phased in over time. Weíre budgeted for a big jump, but under current tax rules, that would be deductible. We will have that answer in the next year or two.
Wow. Are you saying anyone who buys a condo in the city gets near zero property taxes for the first 10 years? Give me a good phrase to google so I can learn more. Can’t blame you for liking Philly over Boston if that’s the case....
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