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Old 10-18-2017, 06:07 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
The future is out there regardless.

I think that many Mainers do not want the population of Maine to grow. Which is why I have had to ask why it seems important for outsiders to thrust population growth onto Maine?

Fine. When you old people are all dead, no more Maine.
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Old 10-18-2017, 07:20 AM
 
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Maine is a great place to hunt moose. Otherwise it is too close to the article circle for my taste
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Old 10-18-2017, 07:53 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,718 posts, read 49,511,045 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by N.Cal View Post
Fine. When you old people are all dead, no more Maine.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
Maine is a great place to hunt moose. Otherwise it is too close to the article circle for my taste
Rate of young adult fleeing Maine in search of high-paying jobs matches the rate of retirees moving to Maine for the lifestyle. The overall population remains steady.

Many [if not most] of the retirees in Maine came to Maine to retire here. I do not have any solid data to prove this specific point, but it seems to be true. This state still has the highest percentage of retirees.

In a thread about retirement, where retirees go is an important feature.
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Old 10-18-2017, 08:39 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
Maine is a great place to hunt moose. Otherwise it is too close to the article circle for my taste
Great autocorrect

My mom had a summer retirement house on the coast in Penobscot Bay with a boat floating in the harbor. It was great for 10 years but it eventually proved to be too remote. A real hospital with specialists was an hour 45 minutes drive in Portland. For that lifestyle, somewhere like Falmouth Foreside would have been a more practical choice with Portland 10 minutes away.
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Old 10-18-2017, 10:05 AM
 
1,082 posts, read 523,847 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
Rate of young adult fleeing Maine in search of high-paying jobs matches the rate of retirees moving to Maine for the lifestyle. The overall population remains steady.

Many [if not most] of the retirees in Maine came to Maine to retire here. I do not have any solid data to prove this specific point, but it seems to be true. This state still has the highest percentage of retirees.

In a thread about retirement, where retirees go is an important feature.
I grew up in rural Maineand New Hampshire. Of my high school class, about 65% never left the state and are retired or close to retiring there. I graduated in the 80’s, I suspect a much higher percentage are leaving now. None of the ones who left for college, military or anything else at a young age have returned, as far as I know.

I have family there and go back to visit, but the lifestyle is so different from what I’ve experienced since leaving, there’s really no going home, so to speak. It’s like it’s own little world, and the natives like it that way.....aaahyup.
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Old 10-18-2017, 10:37 AM
 
7,964 posts, read 5,063,154 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichiganGreg View Post
... When DW and I sold our tech company in CO and moved to Maine, I thought 'hey, people here need jobs, so we can get someone to come on board to learn a new skill, and we can all grow together!!'.

NOT.

...the kids are leaving because of ingrained bias toward anything the the locals don't understand. That is SAD, and is contrary to logic.
This is the prevailing ethos in much of what's pejoratively (but not incorrectly) labeled as "flyover country". The emphasis is on stasis and preservation, not growth or innovation. Outside of the major cities or college towns, one often finds such parochial sentiment. It holds in the Midwest, the South, the Plains, even the rural parts of California.

There's much that's commendable about country living; we need not recite that here, as otherwise the subject would never even have bestirred our consideration. And in the later stages of life, it goes without saying that the bustle and dynamism of the workaday world is a decidedly mixed blessing. Nothing new there! But everyone depends on continued economic growth. It is necessary for pensions and investments. It is necessary for keeping taxes low, services robust, places livable (the latter of course being a matter of opinion). Even if we ourselves don't need jobs, others around us do. If those others are going to be poor, or otherwise economically disadvantaged, we may ourselves not be directly affected, at least not at first. But eventually we will be.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
I think that many Mainers do not want the population of Maine to grow. Which is why I have had to ask why it seems important for outsiders to thrust population growth onto Maine?
Population growth is necessary for property values to rise. If we're going to regard our houses and land as investments, we need for demand to be rising. The bromide about "Invest in land, because they're not building any more of it", is predicated on the idea of there being more people on the land. If on the contrary there are fewer people, then in effect, yes, more land is being "built".
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Old 10-18-2017, 12:45 PM
 
Location: The Berk in Denver, CO USA
14,059 posts, read 20,404,877 times
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Big City for us.

1. Easy access to medical care. 4 miles to Kaiser which was important during chemo.
2. Easy access to grocery stores. I can walk to 4.
3. Easy to meet more people.
4. Easy to find organizations to join.
5. More restaurants. I have 24 within 6 blocks of my house.
6. Transportation options: public buses, Uber, Car2Go.
7. Liberal (socialist?) political climate.
8. Better public services. For example, trash/recycling is courtesy of my taxes and the city government.
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Old 10-18-2017, 01:02 PM
 
13,993 posts, read 7,458,129 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
Population growth is necessary for property values to rise. If we're going to regard our houses and land as investments, we need for demand to be rising. The bromide about "Invest in land, because they're not building any more of it", is predicated on the idea of there being more people on the land. If on the contrary there are fewer people, then in effect, yes, more land is being "built".
Maine has different math. In the desirable coastal areas, the lakes, and the ski resorts, property prices are driven by vacation home owners who are largely metro Boston and almost entirely somewhere in the affluent Northeast Corridor. Many of those vacation home owners later become retirees. They're affluent enough that many snowbird to warmer places in the winter.

In logging truck and potato farm Maine? Nope. Land will always be cheap because there is so little economic opportunity.
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Old 10-20-2017, 06:10 PM
 
214 posts, read 85,060 times
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We have been in a suburb of Sacramento for the last twenty years.
Living here has kept us warm, safe, dry, and comfortable (financially).

Downside..... we went brain dead 15 years ago....

For our retirement we want loud and messy , with access to good healthcare.

So it's big city for us. We think it's our just due for the last 15 years. :-)

PS Where are the Smilies at ?
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Old 10-21-2017, 04:54 AM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,800 posts, read 4,858,884 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
Rate of young adult fleeing Maine in search of high-paying jobs matches the rate of retirees moving to Maine for the lifestyle. The overall population remains steady.

Many [if not most] of the retirees in Maine came to Maine to retire here. I do not have any solid data to prove this specific point, but it seems to be true. This state still has the highest percentage of retirees.

In a thread about retirement, where retirees go is an important feature.
I think it is because the ice cold winters are perceived to be slowing the aging process. I think that is why my freezer still has stuff in it from 10 years ago.

LOL Just had to send that one down range. I was just up there yesterday. It hasn't changed my mind about returning permanently.
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