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Old 10-04-2017, 07:02 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,673 posts, read 33,676,768 times
Reputation: 51867

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I could never live in a real city. I don't even like to visit them. Too much people, cost, traffic, homeless, noise, trash, illness, walking...did I mention I haven't parallel parked since my road test in the early 1970s?

I like to drive and would never do it in a city. I live close to Knoxville and almost never go there. This year, I've been there once. I like sprawl. I like trees and green grass.

The last time I lived in a real city (DC) was between the ages of 18 and 21.

By "real" city I mean what people generally think of when they hear the word "city." Technically, my town is a city on paper. It's incorporated and has its own schools, trash, police, utilities and fire department apart from the county but it has very low population density (345 people per square mile) because it's 29,330 people spread over 85 square miles in land size plus about 5 square miles of water. No mass public transportation, either, and no highway runs through it.

I call it a suburb but even for a suburb it has a lot of unused land. I like to visit rural areas.

To get the population density of where you live divide the square miles and population.

Knoxville's population density is 1,816 people per square mile. That's actually fairly low for a city. The population density of Baltimore, MD is 7,598 people per square mile and the population density of Boston, MA is 13,903 people per square mile.

I'm just trying to point out that the perception of what constitutes a "city" can be different.
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Old 10-04-2017, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,572 posts, read 17,544,804 times
Reputation: 27627
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
Perhaps you are like us. After spending nearly our entire careers in Houston, we knew we wanted to leave when I retired in December 2010. We investigated smaller cities and visited a few such as Providence and Portland, ME. When it came down to really imagining ourselves living in a smaller city day-to-day, we realized that it wasn't big cities we were tired of - it was the bugs, humidity, endless and brutal summers, sprawl and the need to drive traffic-clogged streets to attend to even the simple errands in Houston.

We began visiting the major cities on each coast and found Philadelphia to be a fantastic fit for us. We have lived in Center City for 6 and a half years and couldn't be happier. We walk nearly everywhere - from restaurants to entertainment to shopping to medical appointments. We were able to get down to one car and keep the other only for occasional get-aways. Downsizing to a maintenance-free condo gives us the time to enjoy all the city has to offer. It's not for everyone, I know, but we know several folks in our condo building who retired to the same kind of lifestyle we are enjoying.

It seems you are concerned about setting up a network of friends. Us too. I moved with my DH, however, so unlike you, we at least had one another to rely on. That said, we didn't know a single soul in the city, but we packed up and moved here 3 days after I retired. After we completed most of the tasks associated with creating a new home, I would wake up with a spouse away at the office and think "What now?" Within a few short months, I was volunteering for two organizations in addition to weekly tai chi. Not only did that give me meaningful things to occupy my time, it linked me (and my DH) into a new network of friends.

Finally, Id like to debunk a tired myth: people in the northeast are not rude but are downright friendly. Im not sure if you had the same experience as us, but in Houston, upon running into people out and about, invariably they would say upon parting Lets get together soon. Well, those invitations never came. Here in Philly, if some suggests getting together, you better have your calendar handy.
Three years ago, I was hired for a job at a satellite office in Indianapolis for a Boston based company. I had to go for a month's training in Boston, and I found everyone there to be much friendlier than in the Midwest.

I think the northeast gets a bad rap based on NY stereotypes, and that's probably not true for the common person on the street.
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Old 10-04-2017, 08:31 AM
 
Location: NYC
2,904 posts, read 1,583,756 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
Three years ago, I was hired for a job at a satellite office in Indianapolis for a Boston based company. I had to go for a month's training in Boston, and I found everyone there to be much friendlier than in the Midwest.

I think the northeast gets a bad rap based on NY stereotypes, and that's probably not true for the common person on the street.
Yes, I lived in the upper midwest for 10 years after 20+ years in NY & what I took away from that was folks from the heartland are more courteous & superficially friendly on an initial basis but hard to get to know on a more personal level & NYers are more direct (interpreted as less polite/rude by non NYers) & initially guarded for day to day encounters but you will know their life story & be a fast friend by a second beer/coffee.
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Old 10-04-2017, 09:01 AM
 
1,052 posts, read 513,755 times
Reputation: 1809
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hefe View Post
Yes, I lived in the upper midwest for 10 years after 20+ years in NY & what I took away from that was folks from the heartland are more courteous & superficially friendly on an initial basis but hard to get to know on a more personal level & NYers are more direct (interpreted as less polite/rude by non NYers) & initially guarded for day to day encounters but you will know their life story & be a fast friend by a second beer/coffee.
In California, you can look like you just crawled out from under a rock, and some phony acquaintance in the grocery store will give you the fake smile and "oh, I love your hair". But don't ever have to depend on them for anything.

You don't get that in the northeast. People are real.
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Old 10-04-2017, 09:48 AM
 
Location: Straddling two worlds
2,517 posts, read 800,175 times
Reputation: 1748
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cabound1 View Post
In California, you can look like you just crawled out from under a rock, and some phony acquaintance in the grocery store will give you the fake smile and "oh, I love your hair". But don't ever have to depend on them for anything.

You don't get that in the northeast. People are real.
Truth.
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Old 10-04-2017, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Sierra County
271 posts, read 116,682 times
Reputation: 371
Regarding retirement, all I want is a health food store to do my shopping. We order some of what we need off of ebay since I sell on that platform.

We utilize Costco once a month and Grocery Outlet weekly. I stop off and shop on my way home from work once a week. Prefer to be working part time, even if we are financially set.

The town we're purchasing a home in is a recreational area. Likely the top mtn biking area in California. It also boasts the Pacific Crest Trail so people from Mexico and Canada can spend years hiking to California.

When I am elderly, it will be time to move. My husband will be dead and I'll need to be close to Doctors, Dentists, health food stores, clothing etc...hopefully re-married by then. I keep my eyes open trying to maintain friendships with single guys anyway just in case I loose him. Dating is no fun and neither is being alone. Would rather marry someone I already know well.
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Old 10-05-2017, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Center City
6,851 posts, read 7,797,618 times
Reputation: 9469
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
Three years ago, I was hired for a job at a satellite office in Indianapolis for a Boston based company. I had to go for a month's training in Boston, and I found everyone there to be much friendlier than in the Midwest.

I think the northeast gets a bad rap based on NY stereotypes, and that's probably not true for the common person on the street.
I think it’s easier for most people to rely on stereotypes. I have a bit of a theory on why northeasterners are more friendly than those in other parts of the country. We live in denser locales and come into contact with a whole diverse populous on a regular basis.

OTOH, in Houston, each morning people drive their air-conditioned cars from their garages at home to their work garages, then take an air-conditioned tunnel to their air-conditioned offices. Each afternoon, they reverse the order, nestling in their oversized suburban homes for the evening. This leads to a life where people only interact with people like themselves. In such an insulated life, those who are different tend to be seen as ”the other.”

The lack of interaction with others combined with suburban sprawl only further isolates people from the diverse broader world. This leads to a life where people tend to live in cocoons, content to spend their free time with their families, playing with all their expensive toys.
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Old 10-05-2017, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Fairfax County, VA
1,387 posts, read 689,484 times
Reputation: 2736
Houston certainly has good reason to value air conditioning, but they are not alone in that. I'm retired but my wife is not. We live in DC for the moment and it's a lovely and bustling place that we both enjoy. But we'll be moving soon as my wife gets her retirement feet wet by switching to a part-time job at a firm in Northern Virginia. We need to shorten her commute. We'll also need to get a lawn service, but my NoVa scouting missions suggest that we'll do quite well in all this. We are moving from a center city (DC) to an edge city (Tysons), and all in all, it should be quite an adventure. I'm looking forward to it.
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Old 10-05-2017, 01:47 PM
 
5,425 posts, read 3,445,259 times
Reputation: 13698
Quote:
Originally Posted by 17thAndK View Post

We are moving from a center city (DC) to an edge city (Tysons), and all in all, it should be quite an adventure.
I'm curious as to why moving from DC to Tysons should be 'quite an adventure'. From your point of view, why is it an adventure?

Tysons is 13 miles from DC.

Having lived in DC, I'm familiar with the area. And I, of course, know that suburban living is or can be different from inner-city living. I realize your wife wants to shorten her current commute from DC to Northern Virginia. (As an aside, commutes from the outer rings of suburbs into DC are often horrible)

Last edited by matisse12; 10-05-2017 at 02:05 PM..
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Old 10-05-2017, 08:20 PM
 
3,801 posts, read 2,014,026 times
Reputation: 3260
Love the city!


But I also want to have a beachfront hideaway. My plan is to get it rented out for vacationers and when it's not booked, that's when I'll be there.
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