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Old 10-06-2017, 12:32 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,838 posts, read 18,851,047 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matisse12 View Post
I would like to move into your recently emptied beach house!
It's for sale. The landlord died, we were year round renters. The downside was that in the winter when all the tourists went away, the area was pretty deserted. Then the horrid winter storms of course, complete with power failures. We could have frozen to death out there with no heat. Oh yes, and the snow that had no place to go in the tiny narrow streets so the town plowed it up over everyone's car and into the yards where it was over my head! Then that snow would freeze solid and remain that way until sometime in March.

But the high end restaurant on the beach had special deals for the year round people--now THAT was fun. Walk there, dine on great food while overlooking the sea. (That's assuming you could open your front door that was piled high with heavy snow that blew there during the night.)

But all in all, I'm glad I had the opportunity to live at the beach. Anywhere you go, you have to take the good with the bad, I guess. Weigh the good against the bad and consider what things are important to you.
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Old 10-06-2017, 12:45 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,579 posts, read 17,561,360 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
They need to break it down in the different areas of the states. For instance, in Boston, MA, the COL is outrageous, the health care is great, and things to do/quality of life is great. There's public transportation and people don't even need cars.That's if you can afford to live anywhere around there in the first place.

Take the rest of the state and the COL is much less, there are run down old cities and towns. Nothing to do, no public transportation.

Same with neighboring CT. There's one of the riches areas in the country down in the part of the state that borders NYC and there must be a lot to do because of the proximity to NYC. There's also an affluent area around Hartford in the north. The rest of the state is like any other state--not much to do, run down cities and towns, medical care is mediocre.

In Virginia you can live around Richmond or you can live out in the sticks. Big difference. Same with NC--everyone wants to move to Asheville where the quality of life is good--probably one or two other places in the state that have good quality of life--and then there's the rest.

They need to list it by area. And they still wouldn't be able to tell us what's best for us. They can list some areas and the statistics that go with them but we still have to sift through all of it and figure out which combination is best suited for us.
The thing is with MA/CT, the high cost/quality areas are where the jobs are and are wealthy. The other areas have very little going on, though even the worst parts of MA will be beat the pants off of the southwest Virginia counties about three miles away from where I'm sitting.

If you're making $40,000 a year in Boston, you're not going to be afford to live anywhere decent. You're probably better off here in Kingsport on that. If you're a top 10%er, it's probably great.

For instance, I've never met anyone who has been super excited to live in Dallas. Many people would gladly trade Dallas for Asheville, but the jobs are in Dallas, not Asheville.

For a retiree, that doesn't really matter, but a lot of people are going to find Asheville to be very expensive for what it offers. I live an hour and a half from there. It's great for weekend trips, but I'd much rather live day to day back in Carmel, IN, unless I was a major outdoorsman or money was of no consequence.
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Old 10-06-2017, 12:51 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiluvr1228 View Post
The five states under Florida are all very cold, snowy states. Is that the kind of place retired people want to live? Shoveling snow, driving on icy roads? Maybe that's all they know so it's no big deal? I live in SW Florida and there are parts of it I hate but I've grown to love it a little more the older I get (62 here). It starts getting flat around Tampa but there are parts of Florida with hills and NW Florida (sometimes called South Alabama) doesn't feel like Florida at all.

However to be honest, if my entire family wasn't here now I would definitely consider someplace with a lot less humidity but not too cold, perhaps Arizona.
*I* don't want to deal with cold and snow, even at my age. I will say that where I lived in West Des Moines, IA was extremely safe, affluent, excellent schools, excellent shopping, so many jobs you could wiggle your nose and walk into something at $40,000-$50,000 (which was amazing considering where I'm from in Tennessee and most people are $12-$15/hr range) low cost of living compared to major coastal cities, and even a low cost of living compared to interior cities like Denver or Nashville.

As a single guy who doesn't like cold weather with no family/ties to the area, I didn't stay. Still, I would place the quality of life in WDM well above anywhere in Tennessee except the toniest suburbs of Knoxville and Nashville. Knoxville doesn't have the job quality that DSM does and Nashville is so much more expensive.

A lot of people like Asheville for the mountain views and outdoor activity. If you're retired and have the time for it, great. I live close to the mountains, and other than walking at the state park ten minutes away from the house in the evening, I might get out hiking or something twice a month. For people working a standard 8-5, especially those with kids, outdoor amenities don't mean as much as you'd think IMO.
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Old 10-06-2017, 12:53 PM
 
11,985 posts, read 5,119,111 times
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Hasn't Asheville and the surrounding area become almost a retirement Mecca? That's the problem with anywhere that becomes popular. With popularity comes a higher cost of living, more crowding and more crime.
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Old 10-06-2017, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
Hasn't Asheville and the surrounding area become almost a retirement Mecca? That's the problem with anywhere that becomes popular. With popularity comes a higher cost of living, more crowding and more crime.
Asheville is a weird mix of Yankee retirees, younger crunchy types who just want to be there and will do anything to get by, trust fund young people, and a handful of locals who haven't been priced out yet.

I was drinking at an expensive bar in Asheville several years back. A senior couple from VT came in and sat down beside me. They were very forthcoming that they were people of substantial means, and asked why things were done certain ways down here, and that things were much better in VT. If they don't like it, go back up north. Hell, for that matter, Asheville is basically the rich New Englanders' playground now.

Last I read, Asheville has the most expensive real estate in the entire state, above even tony suburbs of Raleigh like Cary and upscale areas of Charlotte like Ballantyne. Locals are fed up with mostly out of area transplants with money driving up the cost of living. Meanwhile, there are few quality jobs for working age locals.

It's a fun town, but a bit dysfunctional and a microcosm of the downsides of gentrification any tourist area.
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Old 10-06-2017, 01:17 PM
 
11,985 posts, read 5,119,111 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
Asheville is a weird mix of Yankee retirees, younger crunchy types who just want to be there and will do anything to get by, trust fund young people, and a handful of locals who haven't been priced out yet.

I was drinking at an expensive bar in Asheville several years back. A senior couple from VT came in and sat down beside me. They were very forthcoming that they were people of substantial means, and asked why things were done certain ways down here, and that things were much better in VT. If they don't like it, go back up north. Hell, for that matter, Asheville is basically the rich New Englanders' playground now.

Last I read, Asheville has the most expensive real estate in the entire state, above even tony suburbs of Raleigh like Cary and upscale areas of Charlotte like Ballantyne. Locals are fed up with mostly out of area transplants with money driving up the cost of living. Meanwhile, there are few quality jobs for working age locals.

It's a fun town, but a bit dysfunctional and a microcosm of the downsides of gentrification any tourist area.
I can never figure out why people move somewhere and then complain it's not like home, LOL! For myself, I want somewhere that is not on a list. I would like somewhere that hasn't been gentrified or somewhere where new comers are easily absorbed without changing the soul of the place.
I'm in CA and the last place I want to move to is somewhere that a million other Californians have moved to like Colorado, Texas, Washington, Oregon, Arizona and a few other states.
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Old 10-06-2017, 01:26 PM
 
9,893 posts, read 3,274,708 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrs.cool View Post
Well, as my daughter says, you can find and do anything you want whether it's 3pm or 3am. Of course she was 25 at the time.
i completely agree with that part, but unless we are retiring super young, not to sure it applies to the majority of folk. And surely these things are intended to target the fat blob in the middle and not outliers...


i lived in NY as a kid, hell my dad was shot in NY! I and yet i am still a fan..
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Old 10-06-2017, 01:29 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,579 posts, read 17,561,360 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
I can never figure out why people move somewhere and then complain it's not like home, LOL! For myself, I want somewhere that is not on a list. Somewhere that hasn't been gentrified.
Positive hype can create more hype in a feedback loop, even if it what was originally being "hyped up" gets paved over and diluted.

Nashville is much the same way. It got this reputation as a friendly, country music city. While all the commercialism still gins up interest in country music and the city itself, walk downtown Nashville for a bit and you rarely hear a Southern accent. It's mostly NJ/NY and Chicago accents.
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Old 10-06-2017, 01:44 PM
 
11,985 posts, read 5,119,111 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by evilcart View Post
i completely agree with that part, but unless we are retiring super young, not to sure it applies to the majority of folk. And surely these things are intended to target the fat blob in the middle and not outliers...


i lived in NY as a kid, hell my dad was shot in NY! I and yet i am still a fan..
Well the list in question has NY on it but the state, not the city.
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Old 10-06-2017, 06:34 PM
 
Location: Upstate, NY
607 posts, read 261,071 times
Reputation: 753
This is why we plan to sno-bird. We get to try different places. We love our general area but the snow and cold can be brutal in the winter. Some years "actual winter" starts in October and lasts through most of April for God's sake. That is a long winter. Long, cold, dark, winter. While we make the best of it by enjoying outdoor activities like skiing, sledding, snow shoeing, etc., the older I get the less I can take it. I'm looking forward to trying places like Naples and Asheville, out west too. We are even thinking about southern Spain and France.
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