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Old 10-13-2017, 08:36 AM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,767 posts, read 4,825,615 times
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I think many of the upper quintile work because they find retirement boring, or they love their jobs.

Personally I've been retired for 7 years and have no problem finding something to do, or people to do it with, but others are not so lucky. Fortunately we have a lot of retired friends and really varied interests. It also helps that my spouse and I are best friends.

I have a friend who recently retired at 65. He was looking forward to it, but he often asked me what I do all day. I told him "whatever I want". Now that he is retired he is going crazy because he doesn't really want to spend all day AND all night with his wife, and apparently he doesn't have any retired guy buddies to do stuff with. I asked him what he wanted to do all his life but never had time for, and suggested he do that. He's still struggling with the issue.
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Old 10-13-2017, 09:07 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
4,830 posts, read 4,944,472 times
Reputation: 17289
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheShadow View Post
Now that he is retired he is going crazy because he doesn't really want to spend all day AND all night with his wife, and apparently he doesn't have any retired guy buddies to do stuff with.
Actually, that's quite common.

While working, you have a big social group. When you retire, you still need friends. Perhaps a wife is not enough, especially if she just daily gives you a "honey do" list.

Humans are social animals. We need to connect with other people.
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Old 10-13-2017, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Mount Airy, Maryland
10,459 posts, read 5,920,270 times
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I plan to work a part time job when I retire. The pay will be low and that's OK, this will be money I'm not counting on so it's extra for fun things. Even with a number of hobbies I still would get bored sitting around too much so I want to have a mindless job (done with the pressure of my current job) that allows me to drive around as I like to do that. Pizza delivery, Uber, something like that would be perfect.
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Old 10-13-2017, 09:22 AM
 
6,306 posts, read 5,046,206 times
Reputation: 12810
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveinMtAiry View Post
I plan to work a part time job when I retire. The pay will be low and that's OK, this will be money I'm not counting on so it's extra for fun things. Even with a number of hobbies I still would get bored sitting around too much so I want to have a mindless job (done with the pressure of my current job) that allows me to drive around as I like to do that. Pizza delivery, Uber, something like that would be perfect.
that is what I want also - why I will only take sub jobs as an aide. I have a former classmate that has her own very popular business with her husband, but she got tired of that - maybe too much together time - and took a job as a cafeteria worker. She says she loves it. Works with other former classmates and they get along great.

She did go through a great deal of pain with the loss of her mother last year. She worked plus took care of her. Maybe she feels listless. I felt the same way after my mom died also last year. All the days and nights spent at the home or hospital - then nothing. The days can seem endless after a loss.
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Old 10-13-2017, 09:48 AM
 
Location: USA
6,223 posts, read 5,354,840 times
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Most of the guys I know who can't wait to retire hate their jobs or are declining in their ability to do the job (especially in physical labor type work) You see plenty of lawyers, doctors, and other professionals working into their 80s because they love what they do, and are still capable of doing the work. If you have a lousy manual labor type job where you drink yourself to a stupor after you get home, those are the guys who want out.

My father is one of these people. Has worked in the grocery business for 30+ years, hated it when he started and hates it even more now. Had to do what he had to do to put a roof over our heads as kids.
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Old 10-13-2017, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Minnesota
1,561 posts, read 1,350,766 times
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[quote=MI-Roger;49797387]I guess that includes me, but it was my plan to find another full-time job after retiring from my previous employer at age 56 with over 35 years of seniority.

Done by planned design, not desperation, in my case.[/QU

Same situation I'm in. I will most likely be "retiring" from my current job in about 9 months, but will be looking for another full, or perhaps nearly full time job at that time. I'm looking for something to pay my health insurance premiums and give me some pocket money until I'm a few years older and can file for Social Security and Medicare. My wife is a few years older then me, so she'll be covered under those two programs when I retire.

My next job will be something that offers me a bit more flexibility in taking some time off here and there as well as less stress! Something in a field I enjoy, whatever that turn out to be :-)
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Old 10-13-2017, 04:16 PM
 
Location: East of the Mississippi and South of Bluegrass
4,453 posts, read 3,751,922 times
Reputation: 9592
Quote:
Originally Posted by John1960 View Post
One-third of those who retire actually come back to the labor market and take another full-time job, according to Deutsche Bank’s Torsten Sløk.

This “reverse retirement” rate is higher for workers in the highest and lowest income quintiles, as shown in the chart below.

https://www.yahoo.com/finance/news/o...150256531.html
Quote:
Originally Posted by skycaller23 View Post
The chart in the OP's link shows a pretty equal percentage between the highest earners and the lowest earners..35% each.
Yes, it does.
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Old 10-14-2017, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Grove City, Ohio
10,128 posts, read 12,376,133 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sand&Salt View Post
That makes me wonder WHAT type of jobs they are getting, since age discrimination is so rampant!
I'll turn 70 next year and am still working full time and I don't see retirement in my future not because I can't (I can retire right now if I wanted to) but I just don't want to.

I was planning on 70 not because I had an overwhelming desire to stop working but because it appeared that is what everyone else did.

I design fire sprinkler drawings and it's a niche field few even know exists because it is so small. It's small but we are required on nearly all large projects around the country.

Here's a page out of a typical federal specification for a military hospital that pretty much explains it. Impossible to outsource.

The rub is in the statistics. The registry shows there are 1,273 of us in the world and 42 of them live in the state of California. Not great pickings and if you put an ad out looking you'd be lucky to get two qualified applicants.

But the interesting thing is the age discrimination picture in our industry. It doesn't exist.

The median age of our group is 61 years old so if you're looking for one of us don't expect any spring chickens. 75% of our group is >50 with 25% of our group at full retirement age or better. Like I said, if you are looking for someone don't be expecting any spring chickens because they don't exist.

IOW I could show up in a walker and still get hired.

To me the job is fun so why should I stop having fun just because I reached a certain age? I get to pretty much pick my own hours, I got some travel in there and I get to see things a lot of people never see. About the time I get bored with a project it's over and time to move on to the next one.
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Old 10-14-2017, 10:12 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,876 posts, read 42,085,992 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron61 View Post
While I have no need or desire to work again, I would be foolish to say no to any knock your socks off offer that might be presented to me.
That's where I am too. I've had a couple preliminary conversations about a Green Bag (political appointment) job here in Maryland but they entail working in departments I have no interest in and driving to Baltimore daily. Ain't gonna happen.

Now, if an advisory board or commission (natural resources, emergency planning or what not that merges with one or another of my interests) that only meets a couple times a month comes open I'm on that train.

I've also been contacted to go back to teaching as a substitute. My answer was that if I wasn't totally fed up with teaching I wouldn't have retired so why would I want to sub.
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Old 10-15-2017, 06:13 AM
 
29,764 posts, read 34,851,819 times
Reputation: 11675
Quote:
Originally Posted by eliza61nyc View Post
article is a little short on details.
This is the study the article is based on.

https://www.federalreserve.gov/econr...2016053pap.pdf

Very detailed

Seven to eight years ago a popular discussion topic was what did it mean to be retired and when was a person in their late 50's up unemployed v retired. What was their path to retirement and was it voluntary or not.
The following is from the link:
The report offers several conditions to be studied. One is the burnout recovery model of leaving and returning to work. It is the focus of much of the study. In short it suggests those who return to work may have retired because of burnout and recovered and went back to work. Other reasons are health, losing their job etc.

Quote:
To motivate our burnout-recovery explanation of exit and re-entry, we first consider why—among those who eventually do re-enter the labor force—the individuals stopped working initially. Looking at the responses to the HRS “reason for stopping work” question, which will be described in more detail below, we see that: 17.4 percent initially stopped working because of health, and presumably re-enter when their health improves; 23.5 percent stop working because they were laid off or their business closed, and presumably re-enter when they are able to find another job (though this means it took them possibly years to do so given that HRS surveys occur every two years); 38.2 percent say their reason for stopping work was that they “retired”, and may have found out they did not like being retired and went back to work or they don’t think of retirement as stopping work. (This is quite common, as we will show in Table A2.); 11.9 percent left work initially due to what they described as “burnout”, with, as we will model, perhaps the intention of taking a break, recovering, and going back to work, with the remainder giving “unknown” or one of many other miscellaneous reasons for stopping work. While we do account for the effects of health shocks on participation decisions, the later two reasons—“retirement” and “boredom or burnout”—are what we wish to focus on here. If an individual in some way plans to stop working (retires or quits due to stress or boredom), starting to work again is not necessarily what we would expect to see though it is very common

Last edited by TuborgP; 10-15-2017 at 06:29 AM..
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