U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-12-2017, 11:02 PM
 
Location: planet earth
4,812 posts, read 1,828,987 times
Reputation: 10675

Advertisements

Also, the understaffed floors for those patients who really need assistance. I had a relative that needed hand feeding. The hospital expected the family to do it - never mind their outrageous charges and what makes them think family is even available to do this?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-12-2017, 11:32 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
7,602 posts, read 4,680,291 times
Reputation: 27806
The worst thing about my most recent hospital experience was the recovery room.

We were told that immediately following surgery I would be moved to the recovery area, where I would stay for about an hour. Then I would be transported to my room and my husband could accompany me there.

I came out of the anesthesia a little groggy and tried to pull the oxygen mask off my face. I'm an asthmatic and instinctively hate having something over my nose and mouth. The nurse came over and yelled at me, then put it back into place. I must have passed out then because I came to a couple of hours later, still in the recovery room. Eventually the nurse from hell came over and I motioned for her to remove the mask. I said I was thirsty, could I have some ice chips? She laughed sarcastically and said, "Oh, I wish I had a nickel for every time I've heard THAT." Then she walked off, presumably to torment someone else.

My neurosurgeon stopped by to see how I was and told me there was a mixup with the room -- the previous pt hadn't vacated it yet. I thanked him and closed my eyes. When I woke again, I'd been there six hours and my husband was standing next to me. Someone (I think the nurse practitioner who works with my neurosurgeon) had retrieved him from the waiting room. He told me how he'd been spending his time. The waiting room outside the surgical suite at Stanford is pretty sophisticated and the staff had kept him apprised of my activity. Or rather, the lack of it.

9 hours after my surgery, I was finally moved to my room, a few minutes short of 10 pm. I asked my new nurse if I could get something to eat, since I had not eaten at all that day. She said, "Well, the kitchen is closed..." But one of the staff hit the vending machines for me and brought back sandwiches, pudding cups, granola bars... I was very grateful to get them and ate everything, albeit slowly.

I have nothing but good to say about Stanford's ward nurses. They have always been caring and helpful. I don't know where they got that creature in the recovery room -- so unlike the rest of the staff. Some day she's going to smart off to the wrong patient, a big donor or a tech billionaire and with any luck, end up in a nursing home emptying bedpans.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-12-2017, 11:38 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
7,602 posts, read 4,680,291 times
Reputation: 27806
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeaverIslandRetired View Post
If I had to pick one small, but miserable, feature: compression socks. Get thee behind me! Or at least, off my legs.
There have been studies done about the efficacy of compression (TED: thrombo-embolism deterrent) hose in a hospital setting, showing they're ineffective. Yet hospitals continue to make patients wear them, even those who are hospitalized just overnight.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-13-2017, 12:39 AM
 
9,676 posts, read 15,852,351 times
Reputation: 16013
Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post
There have been studies done about the efficacy of compression (TED: thrombo-embolism deterrent) hose in a hospital setting, showing they're ineffective. Yet hospitals continue to make patients wear them, even those who are hospitalized just overnight.
The worse part is when Nurse Ratched puts them on you. They're so tight you can't do it yourself, especially if you've just had orthopedic/hand surgery. They pinch you with their nails to pull the stockings up. Its torture, being pinched all the way up your legs. If you dare complain they say "don't tell me, talk to your doctor". Here's the magic words say "I refuse this part of treatment, until I can speak with my doctor" Legally, they must stop whatever they're doing if you refuse.


I had a terrible hospitalization for a bone infection years ago. After about a year, the infection returned. Instead of putting me back in the hospital, they set me up with home health care. Nurses came out 2x/day to run IV antibiotics, and also drew blood when needed. Nobody found it necessary to come to my door at 3 am to get my weight. More peaceful, and I was in my own home.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-13-2017, 12:42 AM
 
9,676 posts, read 15,852,351 times
Reputation: 16013
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tonyafd View Post
It really is the noise. The hospital is no place to recuperate from surgery.
The staff creates the most noise, especially during the night shift. Just when patients are getting settled, they have conversations in the hall, literally screaming up and down the hallways, and its not work-related, more like hey, who'd you go out with last night? etc.....that and leaving lights on, not shutting patient doors behind them......its like a damned zoo in there
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-13-2017, 12:49 AM
 
774 posts, read 590,718 times
Reputation: 1340
The worst thing about a hospital stay is .......... the bill.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-13-2017, 01:30 AM
 
1,202 posts, read 705,254 times
Reputation: 2122
I had surgery. I was out of the recovery room and in a bed in a regular room while my wife waited and waited in a waiting area for several hours. She would ask for an update and someone would go check and not come back. All the others in the waiting had left and she's still waiting. They started turning out the lights like no one was there. My wife had to latch on to some hospital worker with something like "Your not leaving me here until I know where my husband is".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-13-2017, 03:32 AM
 
5,163 posts, read 2,773,419 times
Reputation: 8270
Having two other patients (one in the room next to me & one across the hall) Code Blue in the same night wasn’t very reassuring...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-13-2017, 04:06 AM
 
Location: the Old Dominion
294 posts, read 148,915 times
Reputation: 1382
I must be very fortunate to have good hospitals where I live. So far, no complaints. As to the poster with the wrist watch situation, you need to report an attempt of theft. It does not matter that you can or cannot prove the act. You need to report it so that the staff has it on record to prosecute when the opportunity comes. We have had three cases at work where food was stolen. Yet no one would officially report their losses. They would ***** to high heaven, but they would not file an official complaint. I told them to shut up.
I hope all of your hospital stays in the future are better.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-13-2017, 10:09 AM
 
1,185 posts, read 662,420 times
Reputation: 4104
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryleeII View Post
The staff creates the most noise, especially during the night shift. Just when patients are getting settled, they have conversations in the hall, literally screaming up and down the hallways, and its not work-related, more like hey, who'd you go out with last night? etc.....that and leaving lights on, not shutting patient doors behind them......its like a damned zoo in there
Absolutely this ^^^. If you have a room near the front desk, be especially ready for shrieking, laughing and constant noise. I spent several nights in the hospital with my mother and the noise was unbearable and completely unnecessary.

Also, if the patient can't feed themselves there is no help which is why I stayed constantly. My mother could feed herself but getting off the pudding top, getting Saran wrappings off, even removing the paper on the straw would have been difficult. The tray is placed in front of the patient and picked up later, with no interest in who ate or drank for gaining strength and hydration.

And trying to get help to get to the bathroom is another story . . . and this was in a university affiliated hospital. The aides are totally overworked. I remember hospital care from decades ago and although medical advances have been made, the patient care has eroded.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top