U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-15-2017, 02:36 PM
 
1,172 posts, read 477,326 times
Reputation: 1927

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
I don't know. I could have caught polio or smallpox if it hadn't been for vaccinations. More of a problem would have been no eyeglasses and no dentists.

As I look back on my family history, there was one family that lost all their children except one when they were only babies. And that baby grew up and died of a heart attack at age 27. He already had three kids, thank goodness. Other causes of death were struck by lightening--(people were outside a lot more than we are)--and drowning by falling through the ice or the boat capsizing. Nothing today could have saved those who had the fatal accidents in which they died nearly immediately.

Some people lived to very old age and probably used herbs and other plant remedies. I think probably some of the remedies were superior to the prescription medicines we have today. I have had some health issues caused by medications and their side effects.
One thing that could have caused havoc in pre-real-dentist days were wisdom teeth gone wrong. For example, if they don't come in properly, they sometimes become infected inside the gum; good luck treating that in the 10th century.

Another thing we have in our favor now is better safety knowledge. For example, we know to head inside immediately when a thunderstorm approaches to minimize being struck, and if outside to avoid places like the ocean, high vantage points, and things like lone trees. Not sure how well known such precautions were way back when.

Re plant remedies and medicines: some plants or plant concoctions may have proven helpful, such as ingesting steeped willow bark for pain, which is analogous to taking an aspirin. And others probably did nothing or provided a placebo effect, which is at least not harmful and can be beneficial. But other "treatments" were not only benign but lethal such as mercury. Plus some herbs available even today can be harmful like comfrey, pennyroyal, and foxglove. And don't forget, bloodletting was a doctor's treatment of choice for centuries, which was at best useless and sometimes killed people. Definitely right about side effects for modern medications, though, which can become a serious issue as well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-15-2017, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
24,966 posts, read 23,873,661 times
Reputation: 30805
Quote:
Originally Posted by bachslunch View Post
A few things:
-can you provide any documentation that dysentery, cholera, and yellow fever mostly happened in times of war? Water supply contamination was usually to blame for the first two, and rampant mosquito problems (especially in warm areas) were to blame for the latter, neither of which strike me as necessarily war-dependent. And both issues seem to have been common pre-20th century, war or no. Since clean water supplies and mosquito counter-measures have become more frequent, these diseases have declined.
I don't think that they did. I know that there were a number of yellow fever outbreaks in Philadelphia.

"For almost a century, yellow fever was an erratic visitor, abruptly appearing after long intervals of relative inactivity. Significant outbreaks appeared in 1741, 1747, and 1762, but major episodes were too uncommon and unpredictable to have a broader political impact until the 1790s, when the fever began striking with greater frequency and fury."

Yellow Fever | Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-15-2017, 04:43 PM
 
511 posts, read 228,445 times
Reputation: 619
I take COQ10 for normal triglycerides, Hawthorn Berries to control blood pressure, Chromium Picolinate for diabetes. Pills for pennies apiece, and I don't get side effects. I'm out at the moment, but usually take Pygeum for prostate. I drink too much red wine, according to health "experts", but I take Himalaya Herbal Healthcare Liver Care 6 herb formula, for 21 cents a day. It's been on the market since 1955, and has been proven in over 200 clinical trials to prevent and reverse liver damage, by regenerating healthy new cells.

In the last half of the 1800s cannabis oil and tincture of cannabis were available in pharmacies, no doctor visit needed, no minimum age, affordable, in over half the medicines sold. Now, cannabis ("marijuana") oil is known to help about 250 medical conditions, and suspected to help close to 600 conditions. But Federal law made it illegal in 1937, after most states did. Cannabis reduces the urge to drink and can be used to stop smoking tobacco. Even in smoked form, cannabis helps 65+ conditions, with no deaths proven. The US Dispensatory of 1851 listed cannabis as a good treatment for all mental health issues.

Now, we have so many going crazy, killing others and themselves. yet a good treatment is illegal.

Another thing that worries me is 85,000 toxins have been approved for our air, soil, water, and food, mostly in the last 50 years. Now food is the #1 drug group killing Americans, about 1/2 million Americans a year, 1/4 million a year each for tobacco and pills.

Antibiotics weaken the immune system, probiotics strengthen immune system, but how many docs tell people on antibiotics, let alone everyone, to take probiotics?

I get bad reactions from vaccines, so don't take them and never get the flu. But I don't doubt that this varies with the individual.

Sorry so negative, but I feel unsafe, due to greed. Best wishes.



Quote:
Originally Posted by bachslunch View Post
Not that this applies to me, but there are a lot of non-issues today that would have been lethal long ago. In addition to pregnancy, farm accidents, untreated heart disease, diabetes, dental issues, and appendicitis, you can add most any disease that is currently controlled by antibiotics or vaccines such as tuberculosis, syphilis, smallpox, diphtheria, yellow fever, tetanus, and polio, or ones rare today because of improved hygiene such as dysentery, typhoid fever, and cholera. And procedures like colonoscopies have notably reduced the number of colon and rectal cancer cases. A simple cut could get infected back then and lead to gangrene or blood poisoning. Heck, even undergoing surgery of any type before adoption of sanitary precautions was a huge risk. Plus there is the use of supposed medical cures, such as mercury, which did nothing and were in fact lethal on their own.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-15-2017, 05:11 PM
 
11,967 posts, read 5,102,113 times
Reputation: 18703
One thing to consider also percentage wise, how many people died an early death in a farm accident or work related accident 150 years ago as opposed to a car accident today. I don't think anyone or any organization has done any research on that to see if those numbers cross each other out as a percentage of the general population when talking about life expectancy then and now.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-15-2017, 05:41 PM
 
1,172 posts, read 477,326 times
Reputation: 1927
Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
One thing to consider also percentage wise, how many people died an early death in a farm accident or work related accident 150 years ago as opposed to a car accident today. I don't think anyone or any organization has done any research on that to see if those numbers cross each other out as a percentage of the general population when talking about life expectancy then and now.
Am wondering if a better parallel would be comparing horse riding accident deaths (of which am guessing there were several) to auto accident deaths, though am thinking car wreck fatalities are a relatively bigger issue.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-15-2017, 05:54 PM
 
1,172 posts, read 477,326 times
Reputation: 1927
GTWJ: see your point and for one reason or another can't argue with much you say. Regarding vaccines, though, I don't think there's any question they have made a huge difference in quality and longevity of life. They've all but eradicated major historic killers like smallpox, tetanus, diphtheria, and polio as well as making most classic childhood diseases very rare (whooping cough, measles, mumps, German measles).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-15-2017, 06:06 PM
 
6,438 posts, read 3,450,877 times
Reputation: 10199
Human evolution has been really fast. Based on how long the earth has existed, it's amazing our development. I probably couldn't count how many times I'd be dead 150 years ago on both hands.

Just medically I feel I could have been dead many times. But, there are many more man made problems in our time versus 150 years ago. So many more people in small areas - NYC for example. Cars, bikes, technology in general. Drugs save so many more lives now, but kill more too. New diseases challenge the pharmaceuticals.

Again, bottom line, I'd be gone now 150 years ago.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-15-2017, 10:25 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
24,966 posts, read 23,873,661 times
Reputation: 30805
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sand&Salt View Post
If you lived back then, would you have been dead already? More than once? The older I get, the more I think about this, and the higher the number gets!


I can think of 5 or 6 "deadly" incidents, off-hand.


Probably why "retirement" was not an issue, back then.
I would have died in my teens. I was in a serious accident which required a very long and very difficulty surgery. I found out later that the doctors still thought I was going to die. I probably would have just 20 years earlier.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-15-2017, 10:41 PM
 
Location: SF, CA
1,508 posts, read 677,239 times
Reputation: 2331
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sand&Salt View Post
If you lived back then, would you have been dead already? More than once? The older I get, the more I think about this, and the higher the number gets!

I can think of 5 or 6 "deadly" incidents, off-hand.

Probably why "retirement" was not an issue, back then.
In my case, perhaps not dead, but possibly deaf, owing to childhood ear infections -- easily treated in modern times with antibiotics.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-15-2017, 11:18 PM
 
6,328 posts, read 3,402,724 times
Reputation: 3490
Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOV View Post
Hard to say what childhood illness could have got me...but the likelihood that I'd die in the civil war is up there lol...
Where you would have been more likely to die of disease than battle wounds.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top