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Old 10-16-2017, 12:49 AM
 
Location: colorado springs, CO
4,990 posts, read 2,296,540 times
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Once, at age 31 for a 2nd trimester hemorrhagic miscarriage/stillbirth. He would have been the 9th of 12.

I am a non-responder to Measles, the genetic cause for that was unknown in the early 1970’s & I was born overseas to US citizen parents. They were not allowed to enter the US with me unless my titers were high enough so they overdosed me on vaccine until my antibodies reacted & quickly re-entered before the antibodies disappeared.

This scrambled my immune response, leading to food allergies which caused frequent ENT infections. One year I spent 9 out of the 12 months on antibiotics. I’ve since outgrown the allergies & no longer get as frequent infections.

The one chronic condition that I had was caused by a surgery & then 10 years later; reversed by a surgery. I’m so naturally clumsy I was never a daredevil as a kid & rarely injured myself.

Last edited by coschristi; 10-16-2017 at 12:58 AM.. Reason: He.
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Old 10-16-2017, 02:23 AM
 
1,184 posts, read 480,826 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerania View Post
I don't think that they did. I know that there were a number of yellow fever outbreaks in Philadelphia.

"For almost a century, yellow fever was an erratic visitor, abruptly appearing after long intervals of relative inactivity. Significant outbreaks appeared in 1741, 1747, and 1762, but major episodes were too uncommon and unpredictable to have a broader political impact until the 1790s, when the fever began striking with greater frequency and fury."

Yellow Fever | Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia
Wikipedia (always a source to look at with scrutiny) suggests there were several outbreaks of yellow fever in the US, though none since 1905. And they occurred in several places (including Philadelphia, Baltimore, and New York), though it looks like some of the biggest happened in southern locales: Savannah, Norfolk, Vicksburg, Memphis, various Texas locales, and several times in New Orleans:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_yellow_fever

Africa, the Caribbean, Europe, and Central America also had outbreaks. These mostly stopped in developed countries in the early 20th century when a vaccine was discovered and mosquito control steps were undertaken in earnest, thanks to the efforts of Walter Reed and others.
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Old 10-16-2017, 07:29 AM
 
Location: Beautiful Rhode Island
6,854 posts, read 11,130,282 times
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Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
Exactly. Childbirth was a gamble back then and people knew that. Many women died and many babies died as well. That along with childhood accidents and diseases brought the average life expectancy way down. It no way means you were old at age 40 and people didn't live to ripe old ages even by today's standards.
True. Only childhood mortality was high. If you lived to adulthood, average age at death in colonial RI (and likely other New England colonies) was 63-65, with many living to 80-90+.

The southern colonies had slightly lower ages at adult death due to pestilence from heat.

Old people worked, lived in their family home, probably did not have a lot of teeth, but they survived on preserved food in the winter, lots of meat, etc.
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Old 10-16-2017, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Western Colorado
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How many times would you be dead, 150 years ago?

Just once.
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Old 10-16-2017, 09:23 AM
 
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I'm 48 now and I think I'd still be alive, 150 years ago.

I did have an unexpected c-section for my middle child, because she was a surprise breech baby. But, although breech does lead to higher risks for both mother and baby, there were, and still are, plenty of occasions when breech births turn out just fine.
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Old 10-16-2017, 12:33 PM
 
Location: equator
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Originally Posted by sonderella View Post
I'm 48 now and I think I'd still be alive, 150 years ago.

I did have an unexpected c-section for my middle child, because she was a surprise breech baby. But, although breech does lead to higher risks for both mother and baby, there were, and still are, plenty of occasions when breech births turn out just fine.

Were they doing C-sections 150 years ago?


And I just thought of this: Asthma. My husband (he "grew out of it" in recent years) and my ex both required inhalers. Did people just die if they had asthma back then? I wonder when inhalers were invented....


Horse and carriage accidents were common back then. With awful consequences. I'm sure not as many as autos, but I bet the severity was similar.
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Old 10-16-2017, 12:58 PM
 
Location: middle tennessee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sand&Salt View Post
Were they doing C-sections 150 years ago?


Caesar's mother had one
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Old 10-16-2017, 02:41 PM
 
Location: Boise, Idaho
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I would be alive and kicking still. I've never been a patient in the hospital myself, except for when I was born (no complications). I homebirthed all my children with a midwife, something that was common 150 years ago. They've never needed antibiotics. I've treated all their issues with essential oils and other remedies. (Yes, I still take them to the doctor for a well-check up.)

I wouldn't be deaf 150 years ago. My hearing tested normal at birth, got the routine baby shots, lost hearing in one ear. More shots at 5 years old (you know, to meet the school standards) and lost hearing in the other ear. If there were no vaccines, I could have an easier quality of life.

My brother would be in a lot better health 150 years ago. At 11, he got a bunch of shots and then "mysteriously" became deathly allergic to shellfish, something he routinely enjoyed before the vaccinations. At 17 he took 6 months of prescription acne medicine that was basically a low-grade antibiotic. One of the rare side effects of the medicine can be seizures... which happened. He took a bunch of anti-seizure medicines and one of THEIR possible side effects is kidney damage. He's stuck on dialysis for the rest of his shortened life. And he WILL die if the power goes out or if the shipment of dialysis solution is stopped. A completely non-issue 150 years ago, since he would have simply just had to deal with the zits.
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Old 10-16-2017, 04:34 PM
 
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Would have died of sepsis when I contracted a UTI in my late teens, when I first became sexually active. Would have died of post-partum uterine infection after giving birth to my first child.

Kind of helps one understand why smart women in the past who had the choice, chose to not have sex and not get pregnant, before modern medicine made these life events much safer.
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Old 10-16-2017, 04:38 PM
 
1,538 posts, read 1,444,171 times
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I'm pretty sure just once. There were no post-death do-overs 150 years ago. Kinda like now.
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