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Old 10-18-2017, 02:35 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
21,856 posts, read 14,356,798 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
Yes but you don't just die from a sore throat or cut. How many people today run to the doctor because they have a sore throat or cut? The vast majority of cuts heal by themselves. Of course they can become infected and you can eventually die from an untreated cut but how rare is that?
The same applies to a sore throat. I'm 58 years old and do you know how many times I went to the doctor in the last 30 years because of a sore throat, zero.
Any kind of ailment has the ability to become worse with time. The vast majority do not. Occasionally or rarely they do. If people 150 years ago died almost every time they had a cut or a sore throat, humans would be an endangered species today.
I don't know of anyone who "runs" to the doctor for a sore throat or cut. For one thing it is too expensive, and for another, it is too inconvenient.

I do agree that most cuts heal all by themselves. And sore throat, unless it is really painful or atypical is probably fairly benign. If you feel sick with it, see a doc though. It could be strep.

I am not sure what point you are making. I don't know many people who spend a lot of time in a doc's office, unless absolutely necessary. And in general we have benefits of safe water, sewage disposal, and modern medicine for the serious stuff, so a lot of us don't have to deal with sickness as much as our forebears did.

Our modern health problems are different than they were 150 years ago. It is true that we have problems, but I think I'd rather have the problems we have, than the problems they used to have.
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Old 10-18-2017, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Gulf Coast
1,256 posts, read 541,525 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
I don't know of anyone who "runs" to the doctor for a sore throat or cut. For one thing it is too expensive, and for another, it is too inconvenient.

I do agree that most cuts heal all by themselves. And sore throat, unless it is really painful or atypical is probably fairly benign. If you feel sick with it, see a doc though. It could be strep.

I am not sure what point you are making. I don't know many people who spend a lot of time in a doc's office, unless absolutely necessary. And in general we have benefits of safe water, sewage disposal, and modern medicine for the serious stuff, so a lot of us don't have to deal with sickness as much as our forebears did.

Our modern health problems are different than they were 150 years ago. It is true that we have problems, but I think I'd rather have the problems we have, than the problems they used to have.
The one and only time I went to the doctor for a sore throat, it was the worst sore throat of my life. I told him to test me for strep throat, he took my vitals and told me he doubted very much that it was strep throat, but did the swab anyway. Strep throat.

I don't think it goes away by itself and can be fatal if left untreated ... is that correct?
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Old 10-18-2017, 05:48 PM
 
1,172 posts, read 477,867 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernProper View Post
The one and only time I went to the doctor for a sore throat, it was the worst sore throat of my life. I told him to test me for strep throat, he took my vitals and told me he doubted very much that it was strep throat, but did the swab anyway. Strep throat.

I don't think it goes away by itself and can be fatal if left untreated ... is that correct?
Some web sites suggest that strep throat can go away on its own in a week or so. No idea if that’s true or not.

But yes, if untreated it can lead to severe complications including death. That alone is a good reason to chase it with antibiotics.

Last edited by bachslunch; 10-18-2017 at 06:40 PM..
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Old 10-18-2017, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Boca Raton, FL
5,165 posts, read 8,689,130 times
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Smile Most likely at birth

Since I was born at 26 weeks and weighed 1 pound 9 ounces, I would have not survived.

10 months in NICU.

Not 150 years ago for sure.
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Old 10-19-2017, 11:33 AM
 
Location: equator
3,431 posts, read 1,527,565 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bette View Post
Since I was born at 26 weeks and weighed 1 pound 9 ounces, I would have not survived.

10 months in NICU.

Not 150 years ago for sure.

Did being a "preemie" lead to any further complications for you? 10 MONTHS in NICU---Wow.
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Old 10-19-2017, 12:21 PM
 
Location: Southern California
23,685 posts, read 8,235,451 times
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I don't know about death but the Asian flu when I was 18 was pretty bad and I can remember that 60 yrs later. The staph infection in recent knee issue, pretty bad but death I don't know. That's been it for me.
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Old 10-19-2017, 03:05 PM
 
Location: PNW
2,474 posts, read 904,009 times
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Yes, I would be dead already. I had an urgent heart bypass at age 43 and a heart-attack during the procedure. 21 years later I'm still here. But I would have died young from that heart-attack 150 yrs ago.

Could have even died at age 30 from double-pneumonia. I relapsed from the first treatment and was out of work for 6 weeks. 150 years ago was before antibiotics, I believe.
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Old 10-19-2017, 05:03 PM
 
Location: Boca Raton, FL
5,165 posts, read 8,689,130 times
Reputation: 6167
Smile Yes - issues

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sand&Salt View Post
Did being a "preemie" lead to any further complications for you? 10 MONTHS in NICU---Wow.
Blind in left eye; limited vision in right. I did wear contacts at one time but I needed an implant which took away the farsightedness and nearsightedness - then I also wear glasses for reading.

I have a good memory, memorize where steps are, etc. Great hearing.

I wish I could meet someone who has what I have though.
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Old 10-20-2017, 04:25 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,547 posts, read 17,537,530 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
I don't think there are any real statistics as there are too many things to factor in as far as life expectancy goes. My only point is that 150 years ago many people did live long lives as the Founding Fathers proved that they did when you look at how many lived well into their 60s, 70s and 80s. People generally didn't die of old age and diseases at 40-50 as many people today believe they did.
Of course people live longer today but how much of that is due to having their lives extended living in nursing homes when the quality of life at that point is questionable.
It would be interesting to see what the statistics would be once you are out of childhood now compared to 150 years ago.
I have two great grandfathers who both lived to 91. And one five x great grandfather who also lived to 91. But women tended to live shorter lives, with pregnancy especially being the worse risk. And some who barely made it into their fourties. But living to 91 was far less likely than it would be now.

But if they did live long lives, it was a home with family and friends, and they would remain part of their family and at home until they died.

Good point about the nursing home. If most of the joys are gone, or you don't remember anything, then is that better?

What our next frontier is is giving that long life a meaning again and a life worth enjoying.
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Old 10-20-2017, 09:58 PM
 
Location: Tucson AZ & Leipzig, Germany
2,370 posts, read 7,760,109 times
Reputation: 3556
When researching my mother's ancestors, I found that both of her parents had 12 generations of ancestors in the US dating back the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1634. My mother's most distant maternal ancestor was James Howe, born in England in 1598. He arrived in Boston in 1634 and lived much of his life in Ipswich, MA until his death in 1702 at the age of 104.

I was stunned to learn that I had an ancestor that was alive in three different centuries and at the time of his death, was probably one of the oldest residents of colonial America. It is amazing that he would have lived to such an age without access to much in the way of medical care in the 17th & 18th centuries.
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