U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 10-31-2017, 01:57 AM
 
1,137 posts, read 569,034 times
Reputation: 4370

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
I bought it from Northern Steel online. They were marketing it basically as an airplane hanger. 40' by 60' with 12' eaves and 14' peak. No interior walls. It was very easy for one person to assemble. We have 13 large 6' wide windows alternating with a dozen small sash windows, along three sides, to give us a wide peripheral view outside [we are surrounded by forest canopy].

Our floor has radiant heat in it. That heat comes from a wood stove, which heats water that circulates to a thermal-bank downstairs, which then circulates through the radiant floor. It is very efficient.

We heat with wood and we are on solar power. We are installing an active Solar-Thermal system right now, we hope to be mostly using solar heat this winter.

That is fantastic. I know the 'barndominium' style of building is growing, and becoming a great alternative to stick building. From what we discovered while investigating this style of building is that the numbers of available levels of detail and finish is almost unlimited, and can far exceed the budget of an expensive stick-built! Actually, from the standpoint of ownership a a lower cost of building, I am rather surprised the tiny house (TH) fad hasn't been replaced with these, especially since the weight of the TH can often require a special mover to handle, and the difficulties of zoning restrictions in some communities is far stricter with them than barndominiums. In our case, the building had to meet all IRC code just like any traditional building, but this was an easy compliance, and we had permits pulled with no hassle, and signed off on first inspection after the dry-in was done. Since we are on a tight budget, we are finishing the interior ourselves. Best of all, it allows mid-design changes which we like, and allows us to yell at the crew doing the work all we want with no hard feelings.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-31-2017, 09:00 AM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,547 posts, read 17,531,320 times
Reputation: 16771
Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
I couldn't agree more. I don't know why some people refuse to acknowledge that there's a bigger world out there than Eastern Tenn.
Here's another good example of being able to by a house for well under $75,000 on 3 acres. And it's less than a twenty minute drive to a large town small city with a hospital, big box stores and a university.

$39,900 for 1500 sq ft on almost 3 acres.
https://www.trulia.com/property/3275...sburg-KY-42743

A house like this is almost exactly what I want when I retire. Not sure why some people will find this horrendous.
I heard a lot of you'll be really bored, but then I couldn't wait to get away from all those people and their traffic. Some would find places like my area and this place utterly boring. I could walk to see a movie, but couldn't get away from crowds of people. That mattered more. And then you'll hear things like what about hospitals and entertainment and so on. But what if you lived with all the entertainment you could want and still didn't go out much.

What I was after was a change in *lifestyle*, not just lower in cost. If I had a way to get somewhere, I'd be happy in a place like that too, even more quiet and out of the way. But if you must have the noise, its implied there is something lacking in you.

Now that I've moved from suburb to small town, I am sure I could do rural quite easily.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-31-2017, 03:41 PM
 
11,969 posts, read 5,102,113 times
Reputation: 18703
Quote:
Originally Posted by markg91359 View Post
This is the problem. Shangri La does not exist. Its a fictional story in a book.

You can't have champagne tastes on a beer budget.

This gentleman doesn't like taxes, but undoubtedly he wants to be near a top-notch VA Clinic. My sense of irony is simply overwhelming me. The VA system is as extensive as it is and does as much as it does because its costs a big chunk of tax revenue.

This country is just of full of people who want the benefits of government, but don't want to pay for them. This guy would probably tell me that he is a veteran and has earned the right to excellent medical care. Excellent medical care doesn't grow on trees. It has to be paid for by ordinary citizens who struggle to pay their taxes.

I just wish more people understood the connection and didn't expect someone else to provide all this for them for free.

I'm 58. I've earned a good income most of my working years and I've paid big taxes. I don't begrudge it. The only thing I ask is for others who want the benefits of government to do the same thing.
This thread was about retiring on a budget. It wasn't about finding Shangri La and having champagne tastes. It wasn't about people not paying taxes and sucking up taxpayer money. If someone has VA benefits, they obviously earned it. It's not free.
I don't understand why there's always the same one or two people on here who will put others down for doing the best they can with what they have. Maybe it's jealously that some people try and and are able to live good lives without retiring with millions. Maybe these people have always been negative about everything in their lives and have to try to make others as miserable as they are like when they call an affordable house that may need some work a "dump" because it's beneath them to even consider such a house regardless that it might be in a beautiful small town with low crime and even a decent hospital near by.
I suppose the few very negative people here would rather see other people retiring on a limited or small budget dig a hole and just die because retiring on a small budget doesn't meet their standards.

Last edited by marino760; 10-31-2017 at 04:11 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-01-2017, 11:49 AM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,547 posts, read 17,531,320 times
Reputation: 16771
Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
This thread was about retiring on a budget. It wasn't about finding Shangri La and having champagne tastes. It wasn't about people not paying taxes and sucking up taxpayer money. If someone has VA benefits, they obviously earned it. It's not free.
I don't understand why there's always the same one or two people on here who will put others down for doing the best they can with what they have. Maybe it's jealously that some people try and and are able to live good lives without retiring with millions. Maybe these people have always been negative about everything in their lives and have to try to make others as miserable as they are like when they call an affordable house that may need some work a "dump" because it's beneath them to even consider such a house regardless that it might be in a beautiful small town with low crime and even a decent hospital near by.
I suppose the few very negative people here would rather see other people retiring on a limited or small budget dig a hole and just die because retiring on a small budget doesn't meet their standards.
I felt that a lot when I was out in California. I was trying to survive on disability, and finally got into an apartment, but it was small and the place was old. Then it sold and the idea of making it into condos happened and that was going to end badly. I knew I'd have to find another cheaper apartment and had already vetoed a lot of them because I knew what was a good part of town and one not to be in past six.

I used the chance to move away. A lot of the people in that building at least were older and the family was moving them close, tired of the uncertainty. To me, after the apartment, this little house feels like a mansion, and that its paid for means everything. It may be small but it is fine for me, and my pets and my hobbies. And it gives me security. And most of all its not TOO BIG.

For decades, unless you live in a densely packed townhouse, the idea of 'too big' has been dismissed as the wrong perception. Of course, everyone wants the max living space and room for every kid and grandma and you second cousin has their own room. And of course, there's the perfect kitchen and a big yard. And even then it might not be perfect enough.

I wonder what happens to people like those who demand the above when they flat out can't afford it, when they have to 'live with' smaller and older and with the origional kitchen? For me if its not falling down and doesn't cost a mint to heat and cool, its great. For them it tragedy and failure. But sorry, I don't feel for them. We had a big house. I stayed with friends after that, and it got an interesting education on space and how much you really need. I loved that time, because I never went back to looking at it as something you judge by its appeaerence, but need. I picked a house which is small but enough. It even feels *too big* at times. I love watching tiny house shows, but I don't think I'm quite ready for that. But I love the spirit that small can be good, and most especially all the space saving ideas which work perfectly well for me.

I think we should have a sticker that says "I saved Grandma's old house" and take pride in not wasting but preserving.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-01-2017, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,670 posts, read 49,416,421 times
Reputation: 19124
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichiganGreg View Post
That is fantastic. I know the 'barndominium' style of building is growing, and becoming a great alternative to stick building. From what we discovered while investigating this style of building is that the numbers of available levels of detail and finish is almost unlimited, and can far exceed the budget of an expensive stick-built! Actually, from the standpoint of ownership a a lower cost of building,
We were pleased with the low cost of steel buildings, compared to woodstick. For this amount of square-footage we got a great deal. People do not realize how much more woodstick construction costs.

After living in this house for a few years, we decided that we wanted a wrap-round porch and carport. I extended the roof out 8' on 3 sides, and 20' on the fourth side, which gave us bays for parking 3 vehicles and my tractor. It more than doubled the footprint of the house from 2400 sq ft to 4900 sq ft, for only $5,000. Now we can step outside and access our vehicles without touching snow or getting wet with rain, and our firewood is stacked under a roof.

Zoning here is practically non-existant. Our land is in 'treegrowth', so it has to stay woodlot. Though as woodlot it is compatible to having livestock in it. Which is all that we really do with it. Trying to clear forest then grading to make it into cropland would be horribly expensive.

I am just a poor retiree, I doubt I could ever afford to clear this land on my pension.

Building permits here require a final inspection signed by the home-owner, so I am the only person required to be any inspecting of my house.

When you only make a Minimum-Wage income you do the best you can, we are very pleased with our decision to move here
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-01-2017, 12:55 PM
 
982 posts, read 144,223 times
Reputation: 658
Quote:
Originally Posted by nightbird47 View Post
... this little house feels like a mansion, and that its paid for means everything. It may be small but it is fine for me, and my pets and my hobbies. And it gives me security ...

Of course, everyone wants the max living space and room for every kid and grandma and you second cousin has their own room. And of course, there's the perfect kitchen and a big yard. And even then it might not be perfect enough.

I wonder what happens to people like those who demand the above when they flat out can't afford it, when they have to 'live with' smaller and older and with the origional kitchen? For me if its not falling down and doesn't cost a mint to heat and cool, its great. For them it tragedy and failure ...

I love the spirit that small can be good ...

I think we should have a sticker that says "I saved Grandma's old house" and take pride in not wasting but preserving.
You took the words right out of my mouth. I love reading your posts about your little house, how much you love it and why you love it. We're kindred spirits in that department.

I wouldn't mind having one of those bumper stickers. It's an honor to have turned our plain old rectangular 973 sq ft ranch house back from a sad, vacant, unwanted property to a loved, comfy and cozy home again. Plus of course the financial freedom, groundedness and peace of mind it affords us in our golden years are priceless. To me, that's the ultimate comfort and luxury!

I'm intrigued by the tiny house shows, too. Love to watch them and get ideas as well. It nauseates me a little, though, when they say "It's so tiny!" Duh. Or they're looking for the stainless steel and granite.

Last edited by barb712; 11-01-2017 at 01:12 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-01-2017, 02:27 PM
 
1,199 posts, read 1,067,962 times
Reputation: 2505
Quote:
Originally Posted by nightbird47 View Post
I felt that a lot when I was out in California. I was trying to survive on disability, and finally got into an apartment, but it was small and the place was old. Then it sold and the idea of making it into condos happened and that was going to end badly. I knew I'd have to find another cheaper apartment and had already vetoed a lot of them because I knew what was a good part of town and one not to be in past six.

I used the chance to move away. A lot of the people in that building at least were older and the family was moving them close, tired of the uncertainty. To me, after the apartment, this little house feels like a mansion, and that its paid for means everything. It may be small but it is fine for me, and my pets and my hobbies. And it gives me security. And most of all its not TOO BIG.

For decades, unless you live in a densely packed townhouse, the idea of 'too big' has been dismissed as the wrong perception. Of course, everyone wants the max living space and room for every kid and grandma and you second cousin has their own room. And of course, there's the perfect kitchen and a big yard. And even then it might not be perfect enough.

I wonder what happens to people like those who demand the above when they flat out can't afford it, when they have to 'live with' smaller and older and with the origional kitchen? For me if its not falling down and doesn't cost a mint to heat and cool, its great. For them it tragedy and failure. But sorry, I don't feel for them. We had a big house. I stayed with friends after that, and it got an interesting education on space and how much you really need. I loved that time, because I never went back to looking at it as something you judge by its appeaerence, but need. I picked a house which is small but enough. It even feels *too big* at times. I love watching tiny house shows, but I don't think I'm quite ready for that. But I love the spirit that small can be good, and most especially all the space saving ideas which work perfectly well for me.

I think we should have a sticker that says "I saved Grandma's old house" and take pride in not wasting but preserving.
Can't rep you again - it's too soon. But this is a great post with a lot of wisdom in it. I want one of those stickers!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-01-2017, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,547 posts, read 17,531,320 times
Reputation: 16771
Quote:
Originally Posted by barb712 View Post
You took the words right out of my mouth. I love reading your posts about your little house, how much you love it and why you love it. We're kindred spirits in that department.

I wouldn't mind having one of those bumper stickers. It's an honor to have turned our plain old rectangular 973 sq ft ranch house back from a sad, vacant, unwanted property to a loved, comfy and cozy home again. Plus of course the financial freedom, groundedness and peace of mind it affords us in our golden years are priceless. To me, that's the ultimate comfort and luxury!

I'm intrigued by the tiny house shows, too. Love to watch them and get ideas as well. It nauseates me a little, though, when they say "It's so tiny!" Duh. Or they're looking for the stainless steel and granite.
Thank you, that's really appreciated. I discovered just how much it means to me that its mine when my son and dil wanted me to move in with them. They did find a big house, and are fixing it up. But the two of them also include her mother, her brother and his wife and kid, and a cousin. That seemed like a bit much. We've talked about 'later' if I should move with them. I'd have a seperate small house. Even my son gets that I need some space.

But this one is my little sancuary and despite not liking the area so much, its got a sufficently cheap cost of living.... I'd love to be in a really rural place but without driving it would be frustrating. I hated it when I quit driving, but distances look true, but aren't and its just not safe. Sigh.....

I'm about to go after the kitchen, or at least when my hand heals. I sliced the left hand by the thumb and its not really painful but very annoying. Just a random accident, slippery grip, but I got to use medicare for the first time and feel better about it now.

I think if I built from scrach it would be a semi tiny house. It would be so much fun and I could put in it just what I wanted, not add space for things which don't need it. I'd do an outside door for the dogs to a secure area they can't get out, maybe one where the cats could go too. Or I'll consider that here. That would make the house feel a lot bigger.

I've discovered I don't need a big kitchen, just an area to cook and room to store. I eat in front with my tv. And I don't need a big bedroom. It fits my bed and a fan/heater and a storage for clothes/ other stuff in a closet. I'd use the main room for my books, on installed shelves, and a computer hutch where I can continue to multitax but keep it neater. Add the tv where it is now with books around it, and some art, and it would be ideal. As it is a lot of it is doable and I'm looking forward to my stupid hand healing. No more wet hands with knives...

When I was thinking about leaving I kept looking at my house, all mine, and discovered how much it is just right for me, and how much I can do to make it even better. I though about all the work I did putting together the tv nook with the book shelves, and all the painting and really understand that its home. And there's more to do but its something I LOVE.

Gotta say that its going to be really good when all the stuff in the boxes has found its home.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-01-2017, 09:28 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,670 posts, read 49,416,421 times
Reputation: 19124
Quote:
Originally Posted by nightbird47 View Post
... But this one is my little sancuary and despite not liking the area so much, its got a sufficently cheap cost of living.... I'd love to be in a really rural place but without driving it would be frustrating. I hated it when I quit driving, but distances look true, but aren't and its just not safe. Sigh......
We have a big kitchen. My wife went through a phase where she was growing lots of beans, then after harvesting them, she dried them and ground them into flour. She was developing recipes for dried-bean flour; breads, pizza crust, snack crackers, fudge, oatmeal cookies, etc. We did 6 years of presenting a 1-hour cooking show with samples, at a local homesteading fair.

Then she took a pig butchering class. Now we have tables in our kitchen to give her enough space to process both halves of a pig at one time. Granted I breed and raise pigs, usually, we have been fine raising one a year and I sell the rest. This year we raised 8 pigs to 275+ pounds each. Butchering has been exhausting every weekend. We have four freezers now to hold the pork. One more pig to butcher this year and I have nowhere to put the pork.

This year a company started marketing a household size Freeze-Dryer. My wife got one. Now she has this thing running constantly and it is loud. We already have a year's worth of food accumulated that she has been canning, but now she can freeze-dry stuff.

I am learning that I need to limit how much kitchen space to give a woman.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-01-2017, 09:31 PM
 
Location: Southern California
372 posts, read 447,812 times
Reputation: 559
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
We have a big kitchen. My wife went through a phase where she was growing lots of beans, then after harvesting them, she dried them and ground them into flour. She was developing recipes for dried-bean flour; breads, pizza crust, snack crackers, fudge, oatmeal cookies, etc. We did 6 years of presenting a 1-hour cooking show with samples, at a local homesteading fair.

Then she took a pig butchering class. Now we have tables in our kitchen to give her enough space to process both halves of a pig at one time. Granted I breed and raise pigs, usually, we have been fine raising one a year and I sell the rest. This year we raised 8 pigs to 275+ pounds each. Butchering has been exhausting every weekend. We have four freezers now to hold the pork. One more pig to butcher this year and I have nowhere to put the pork.

This year a company started marketing a household size Freeze-Dryer. My wife got one. Now she has this thing running constantly and it is loud. We already have a year's worth of food accumulated that she has been canning, but now she can freeze-dry stuff.

I am learning that I need to limit how much kitchen space to give a woman.

Mrs. Submariner sounds amazing!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top