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Old 01-01-2018, 09:50 PM
 
4,323 posts, read 881,814 times
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I'm 66 and too old to be offended. Call me what you want, geezer, old fart, whatever, it's just a teasing name. Besides, I can give as good as I get. My give a darn about politically correct names left a long time ago.
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Old 01-01-2018, 10:21 PM
 
Location: Gulf Coast
1,159 posts, read 649,503 times
Reputation: 2249
What I hear most is Senior Citizen. I'm fine with that. I have no problem telling people I'm "old". Often they are surprised because I have a youthful looking face. I'm struck that sometimes people expect more from me because they think I'm way younger than I am. Creaky bones and a lot of stiffness and not quite so fast brain makes me explain sometimes, yeah but I'm old.

The terms I never liked and found disrespectful was "my old lady" for Mother or "my old man" for father.

Old fart brings up pictures in my mind of skinny old men in bedroom slippers shuffling along. Yeah, don't call me that.

I'm fine with just my first name. However, I do understand children using the Miss ___ and that seems respectful.

Surprised by this post. So many thoughts about it.
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Old 01-01-2018, 10:48 PM
 
Location: Tucson Arizona
3,887 posts, read 1,651,610 times
Reputation: 10199
In Hawaii, "Auntie" and "Uncle" are terms of respect for adults.
When they start saying, "Granny," you know you're old.

And Senior classes are run by the "Elderly Activities Division" You must be at least 50 to be elderly.
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Old 01-01-2018, 11:23 PM
 
5,163 posts, read 2,777,659 times
Reputation: 8275
I don’t care what I’m called, unless it’s old hag, old bag, or old b****, then I’ll have to fight you.
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Old 01-02-2018, 06:47 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,747 posts, read 36,160,327 times
Reputation: 63385
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat Answers View Post
What I hear most is Senior Citizen. I'm fine with that. I have no problem telling people I'm "old". Often they are surprised because I have a youthful looking face. I'm struck that sometimes people expect more from me because they think I'm way younger than I am. Creaky bones and a lot of stiffness and not quite so fast brain makes me explain sometimes, yeah but I'm old.

The terms I never liked and found disrespectful was "my old lady" for Mother or "my old man" for father.

Old fart brings up pictures in my mind of skinny old men in bedroom slippers shuffling along. Yeah, don't call me that.

I'm fine with just my first name. However, I do understand children using the Miss ___ and that seems respectful.

Surprised by this post. So many thoughts about it.
I cannot STAND it when people use those terms for their significant other!!!!!!!! If my husband ever called me his "old lady," I'd...well, I don't know what I'd do but I bet he wouldn't do it again.
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Old 01-02-2018, 10:13 AM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,781 posts, read 4,833,476 times
Reputation: 19420
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I hope so. But I am always thrown by it. It immediately makes me look at them askance.

I've encountered several people over the course of my life who have used that phrase when talking with me, and they were absolute SHYSTERS who used that sort of terminology to let people think they were subservient or respectful, when all they were really trying to was lull people into a false sense of security while they robbed them blind - or tried to in my case (didn't work).

1) A guy who rented a guest house of my parents, and because "he was so polite" (in other words, because he called my mom and dad Mr So and So and Miss So and So) they didn't run a criminal background check on him, against my advice. Oh, they just thought he was such a gentleman! I flat out told my parents that his calling me Miss Kathryn was more of a red flag than not, and I was right on the money. He is now in jail - again.

2) A secretary I hired when I was in my thirties, and she was in her fifties or sixties. She insisted on calling me Miss Kathryn though I told her over and over again, "Don't call me that, please. Just Kathryn will do." I ended up firing her because in spite of her being oh so polite and in spite of her constantly bringing fresh baked goodies to the office, she was the worst secretary I've ever had in my life, and dishonest to boot. And you know what she did when I fired her? She went complaining to MY manager calling HER "Miss So and So, Miss So and So" and I had to explain to my manager that this was not some sweet little subservient lady but was actually a very dishonest and disingenuous person. (I won that round too.)

3. The landscaper that my parents LOVED who called everyone Miss and Mister So and So, constantly. My parents kept saying, "Do you know he was a DOCTOR back in Mexico?" OK, no, I don't know that and still am not sure of that, but what I do know is that while he was calling everyone Miss and Mister, he was doing a terrible job on anything other than the most basic lawn care, and in fact I had to threaten him with small claims court once because against my better judgment I gave him $500 in advance to build a small patio for me, and he just wouldn't come do it. For months. I was a single mom and $500 was a lot of money to me, and he knew that but every time I'd see him and say, "When are you coming to do that patio?" he'd say, "Oh, Miss Kathryn, I'll be there this Saturday" and then he just would never show up.

I could go on because I have many, many other examples of this, but my point is that I'm not impressed by being called Miss Kathryn by anyone. All anyone has to do to get my mom to do ANYTHING (and I do mean anything for any amount of money) is to act subservient and start calling her Miss Milly (not her real name) and she just thinks they are the sweetest, most honest person in the world. Oh brother!

No thanks. Just call me Kathryn and act like a responsible adult around me.
Okay, now I see why it bothers you. You've described three very memorable instances when you had bad experiences with this exact form of address. No wonder it bothers you.
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Old 01-02-2018, 10:16 AM
 
652 posts, read 334,509 times
Reputation: 887
Quote:
Originally Posted by mlulu23 View Post
Because words can be used like weapons piercing the heart, and setting things in motion either good, or bad.
Only if YOU let them, or look for a reason to get upset.
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Old 01-02-2018, 10:20 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
14,698 posts, read 8,483,912 times
Reputation: 29394
I call them old people. They make a large portion of my patient base. They appreciate my honesty. In my experience, they have the attitude that they want honesty, not political correctness, and they appreciate me calling them exactly what they are.
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Old 01-02-2018, 10:34 AM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,661,739 times
Reputation: 35449
I think there’s a difference between being offended and just plain not liking a term. The only one I really don’t like for older people is “baby boomer.” Other names or terms for old people don’t bother me.

The words “baby boomer” themselves to me are just silly. I know what they represent, the large numbers of babies born after WWII but to me it sounds like we are being called babies which we are not and we go boom which we don’t. I guess it’s just one of those words/phrases I don’t like the sound of. Most of us have them. We could do a whole new thread on “What Words/Phrases Bug You?” Actually, someone on my FB page did do that. It was fun reading people’s comments.

So I am annoyed by what I think is a goofy name but I am not offended by it. It’s just sounds too silly to me to be offensive.
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Old 01-02-2018, 11:33 AM
 
4,070 posts, read 1,556,481 times
Reputation: 7411
Baby Boomer? I'm okay with that.
Mister Hoot/Miss Annie? Sounds artificial, so no thanks.
Mister Smith? Sure, but it makes me look around to see if you are talking to my grandfather..
Senior Citizen? Sure
Geezer? Only if you know me
Old fart? Fighting words, very disrespectful
Old people/old person/Golden ager? Not so much

Late for dinner? Now I'm pi$$ed!

Hoot
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