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Old 01-07-2018, 10:53 PM
 
Location: Erie, PA
2,879 posts, read 1,269,494 times
Reputation: 6480

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrolman View Post
When I retired four years ago, I rarely, if ever, heard the following terms from the citizenry that I served:

Fuzz
The Heat
John Law
Bull
Dick (Tracy)
Poison
Barney Fife

I was still referred by the following:

Pig
Gestapo
Donut
1-F**K-12

Aah. I miss the old days....
My mom (born 1943) uses the slang term "the Fuzz" for the police, lol. I have heard "the Heat", "John Law", and of course "Pigs" but not the others on the list.

State troopers were "Brown Hats" because of the uniform they wore at the time and of course everyone was told to slow down and 'watch out for the Brown Hats!'

Here there is no special name for different types of law enforcement. They are all "police".

Interesting how terms change over the years.
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Old 01-07-2018, 11:00 PM
 
Location: CA
459 posts, read 314,359 times
Reputation: 760
"Like, wow man."
"Diggin' it" or "dig"
"Bummer"
"What a drag"
Did anyone mention "Right On", yet?
"Doobie"
"Keep on Truckin'"
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Old 01-07-2018, 11:31 PM
 
2,952 posts, read 1,645,465 times
Reputation: 5292
Neat-o!

Can - bathroom
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Old 01-08-2018, 12:41 AM
 
Location: Northern California
436 posts, read 196,170 times
Reputation: 552
God Bless you (when someone sneezes) shortened to leave God out
Knarly
lets flip for it (deciding who will do this or that)
rad (short for radical)
phony baloney (a fake person)
gay (before it was perverted)
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Old 01-08-2018, 02:16 AM
 
5,163 posts, read 2,791,592 times
Reputation: 8275
Don’t shine me on, or the opposite
You’re shinin’ me on
Don’t Bogart that joint
Let’s book

I never, ever heard anyone say “groovy”...you would have been considered very uncool to say that...only heard in movies or TV.
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Old 01-08-2018, 03:17 AM
 
Location: Tampa, FL
27,798 posts, read 26,255,180 times
Reputation: 14611
I dig this thread.
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Old 01-08-2018, 03:50 AM
 
35 posts, read 23,632 times
Reputation: 226
Jive turkey
I'm hip (when you are in agreement with someone)
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Old 01-08-2018, 05:33 AM
 
Location: the Old Dominion
297 posts, read 150,782 times
Reputation: 1387
Default ...either one...

Quote:
Originally Posted by movedintime View Post
hip

hep
'still use this one.
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Old 01-08-2018, 05:44 AM
 
Location: the Old Dominion
297 posts, read 150,782 times
Reputation: 1387
Default ...pulling it off...

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarciaMarshaMarcia View Post
Don’t shine me on, or the opposite
You’re shinin’ me on
Don’t Bogart that joint
Let’s book

I never, ever heard anyone say “groovy”...you would have been considered very uncool to say that...only heard in movies or TV.
As a teenager in the 70s, I have heard people say, "in the groove". My understanding (no real experts on this) is that "groovy" was passe after the 60s. For the average person, using this word sounded pretentious even at the time of its usage. Especially a young conventional person (young status quo).
Only a couple of times did I hear someone use this word and it seemed to fit. In both instances the speaker was African-American (known as Black at the time). The last one being less than two years ago and he was under forty.
I like the word groovy, but using it today would be the equivalent of wearing a peruke (and not at a costume party, where just about everything goes).

p.s. come to think of it, wasn't your callname (MashaMaciaMarsha) a cliché from a certain sitcom/family show?
I like it.
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Old 01-08-2018, 05:50 AM
 
12,077 posts, read 5,165,692 times
Reputation: 19051
Some of these are from the sixties that carried into the early 70s (groovy or groove, hip and a few others) and some are from the early 80s, Moon Zappa style (rad, knarly for example).
Others are still used today, bummer for example.
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