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Old 01-15-2018, 09:43 AM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
1,424 posts, read 2,435,692 times
Reputation: 1776

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Living near hiking trails or other outdoor areas was never important to me and never something I even thought about when working or retired. When I bought my first condo it was located 2 blocks from regional hiking trails with beautiful views where you can walk, run, skate/rollerblade, bike and horseback ride. While living there I never used the trail. When I moved ¼ mile away, I brought my kids hiking there a few times. Since I’ve retired I don’t even think about going there.

OP, it sounds like your missing the outdoor activities . Why not schedule activities on at least one of the weekend days and stick firmly with your plan. When summer comes around and daylight hours are longer you should be able to do a bit more outdoor activities after work.
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Old 01-15-2018, 10:43 AM
 
5,402 posts, read 6,555,791 times
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I don't know serious.

In theory a natural setting seems ideal for retirement but practically speaking it is better for me to be close to major needs. Doesn't mean I cant drive somewhere and hike or picnic by a creek though. Parks are everywhere. And I like having neighbors for safety and community reasons; I would find an isolated natural setting lonely. but lovely.

I just take long vacations back home in the mountains and renew my spirit when need be.

Back when I grew up in WNC, I always got some sort of seasonal disorder in late Jan or Feb. It is so cold and grey in Asheville, day after day with bare trees, and no green other than the spruce or pine. My grades would drop and I just hated looking at layer after layer of bare and grey.

Don't know about Johnson City but maybe you are suffering from that as well. Hopefully a good walk up in the hills will shake it out. good luck.
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Old 01-15-2018, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,698 posts, read 23,713,463 times
Reputation: 35455
For me there is no question. Living near whatever you want to be near at any stage of your life is what should be done if at all possible. Nature or urban setting, doesn’t matter. You know today, you don’t know tomorrow.

I used to work with a man who was well on his way to becoming one of those “Millionaires Next Door.” His job was to maintain the computers for our small branch office. He didn’t socialize, had few friends and lived simply. He built a cabin on some beautiful woodsy acreage he bought little by little. He loved nature. His dream was to retire and build an animal sanctuary with his savings.

You’ve probably guessed by now that never happened. Just as he reached retirement age he was diagnosed with pancreatic Cancer. He died soon after. By then he had the million which went to his sister who built the sanctuary in his name.

At least he did get to enjoy his land a bit while he was working but not nearly as much as he'd hoped he would. But if he hadn’t lived where he couldn’t at least have driven there on weekends or vacation he wouldn’t even have had that.

I wouldn’t wait.
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Old 01-15-2018, 11:22 AM
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
10,576 posts, read 14,373,391 times
Reputation: 23502
Quote:
Originally Posted by jean_ji View Post
When nature is important to you, this time of year is tough with the short days when you are working. Learn to appreciate that glimpse of the mountains on your drive home, you did not have that in IN. When you lived in IN you also did not have the family responsibilities you have now, so more of your time is not your own. This is why you aren’t getting the time outside you expected to have when you moved back. Step back, look at where your time is going and see if you can restructure it.

When you trade in your cubicle hours for retirement ones, you won’t be changing who you are. You can change your location, but not always your habits. If you have never learned to feed your inner needs that make you happy, be it location, nature, activities, lifelong learning, etc., don’t expect an ephinany to occur when you retire. Just because you might move closer to some place you can do more of the things you like to do, doesn’t mean you will. A lifetime of only seeing roadblocks won’t disappear overnight.
One of the best post I've read in a while and really touches on something for me.
I'm close to retirement but not quite there yet, so I get the not always having enough time to get out and enjoy the outdoors. However I REALLY enjoy the views, as you said the glimpse of the mountains, when I am out and about.

This probably won't make sense to anyone else, but SC do you remember Komoshika's pictures? The beauty and the peaceful feeling and sense of community they had? That's what I see and feel when I travel around the tri-cities, the hillsides dotted with hay ricks or livestock, the 'smoke' coming off the mountains, the creeks everywhere. The clouds sitting on the mountains with their layers of black, blue, gray and white that are a painting come to life, the coat of colors on the mountains in the fall, the snowcaps in the winter.
I see the other stuff too, the ugly buildings and car lots and factories (though truthfully looking at eastman fascinates me because of it's sheer size and complexity) but I focus on the things I enjoy. It's like a promise of what I will be able to have when I do retire and will have more time to 'do' rather than just 'view'
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Old 01-15-2018, 01:23 PM
 
Location: equator
3,519 posts, read 1,559,553 times
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When I was 50, I had a 70 y/o friend who was leaving our gorgeous hiking, rafting, biking---world-renowned Moab, UT. Her back was failing and she didn't want all "that" in her face, since she could no longer participate in those physical activities she loved.


I didn't understand it at the time. Why leave? Now at 62, my failing arthritic joints are dictating the same thing. I'm glad we moved from there. It would hurt too much to have all that "in my face". Hiking, rafting, horseback riding is all in the past for me, now.


So now I have a flat, level beach to walk on, which I can handle. I see it all day long from my bed/desk where I do the sedentary "hobbies". So it means the WORLD to me, to see that wonderful ocean even when I'm doing nothing active, and will mean even MORE if I get to the point of even less activity.


I would be very unhappy without a great natural area/great view now in retirement.


SC, if you work until 5 pm, in the short days of winter, you would miss out on the outdoors. Any chance of a different shift? I didn't work until 4 pm so had the "day to play" in the great outdoors, back in UT.


A view may become increasingly important as your active hobbies MAY take a back seat.
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Old 01-15-2018, 01:48 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,699 posts, read 17,668,720 times
Reputation: 27773
Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
One of the best post I've read in a while and really touches on something for me.
I'm close to retirement but not quite there yet, so I get the not always having enough time to get out and enjoy the outdoors. However I REALLY enjoy the views, as you said the glimpse of the mountains, when I am out and about.

This probably won't make sense to anyone else, but SC do you remember Komoshika's pictures? The beauty and the peaceful feeling and sense of community they had? That's what I see and feel when I travel around the tri-cities, the hillsides dotted with hay ricks or livestock, the 'smoke' coming off the mountains, the creeks everywhere. The clouds sitting on the mountains with their layers of black, blue, gray and white that are a painting come to life, the coat of colors on the mountains in the fall, the snowcaps in the winter.
I see the other stuff too, the ugly buildings and car lots and factories (though truthfully looking at eastman fascinates me because of it's sheer size and complexity) but I focus on the things I enjoy. It's like a promise of what I will be able to have when I do retire and will have more time to 'do' rather than just 'view'
Yes, I remember those pictures. I like pretty pictures as much as anyone, but a lot of us don't see that every day. Running up and down 26 from JC to KPT isn't anywhere near as scenic as like driving the Blue Ridge. I do see Bays Mountain and some mountains on my way into Johnson City. Looking out over this vacant parking lot and used car/rent to own place across the street just sucks.
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Old 01-15-2018, 02:25 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,699 posts, read 17,668,720 times
Reputation: 27773
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sand&Salt View Post
When I was 50, I had a 70 y/o friend who was leaving our gorgeous hiking, rafting, biking---world-renowned Moab, UT. Her back was failing and she didn't want all "that" in her face, since she could no longer participate in those physical activities she loved.

I didn't understand it at the time. Why leave? Now at 62, my failing arthritic joints are dictating the same thing. I'm glad we moved from there. It would hurt too much to have all that "in my face". Hiking, rafting, horseback riding is all in the past for me, now.

So now I have a flat, level beach to walk on, which I can handle. I see it all day long from my bed/desk where I do the sedentary "hobbies". So it means the WORLD to me, to see that wonderful ocean even when I'm doing nothing active, and will mean even MORE if I get to the point of even less activity.

I would be very unhappy without a great natural area/great view now in retirement.

SC, if you work until 5 pm, in the short days of winter, you would miss out on the outdoors. Any chance of a different shift? I didn't work until 4 pm so had the "day to play" in the great outdoors, back in UT.

A view may become increasingly important as your active hobbies MAY take a back seat.
I live just a couple miles from a very good city park. I can see the mountains coming into my townhome, but not really from inside. It abuts some woods which is better than nothing. I'm also fairly close to a biking trail. I didn't get over here until September, so haven't been there in the longest months of the year.

No, I have no schedule flexibility at all. I worked various evening shifts right after college - mostly 3:30 PM to 2:00 AM - 4x10, or 6:00 PM to 2:30 AM, 5x8. Even getting home at 3:00-4:00 AM, I was still up by 12 virtually every day and had the daytime hours for outdoor stuff or any errands.

I've never really adjusted to working straight days. I'm still wired to stay up until midnight. I have to be up by 7:00 if I want to eat and shower. I usually leave a little before 7:30 and get home about 5:45. My commute is actually longer because I wouldn't live in Kingsport. I have to go out 30+ minutes from the job site to find an acceptable place to live. I miss the schedule, but not the job or rate of pay.
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Old 01-15-2018, 02:55 PM
 
Location: Columbia SC
9,024 posts, read 7,791,206 times
Reputation: 12283
I moved about for jobs and promotions. I lived in the nicer parts of the areas I relocated to (Chicago, OH, MA, NY, CA). While I enjoyed them all, the company location dictated the area I lived in. When I retired, I got to choose the area. Me and only me made the decision. Top on my list was year round golf. I choose SC.
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Old 01-15-2018, 05:54 PM
 
Location: Cochise county, AZ
4,987 posts, read 3,480,462 times
Reputation: 10543
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
I live just a couple miles from a very good city park. I can see the mountains coming into my townhome, but not really from inside. It abuts some woods which is better than nothing. I'm also fairly close to a biking trail. I didn't get over here until September, so haven't been there in the longest months of the year.

No, I have no schedule flexibility at all. I worked various evening shifts right after college - mostly 3:30 PM to 2:00 AM - 4x10, or 6:00 PM to 2:30 AM, 5x8. Even getting home at 3:00-4:00 AM, I was still up by 12 virtually every day and had the daytime hours for outdoor stuff or any errands.

I've never really adjusted to working straight days. I'm still wired to stay up until midnight. I have to be up by 7:00 if I want to eat and shower. I usually leave a little before 7:30 and get home about 5:45. My commute is actually longer because I wouldn't live in Kingsport. I have to go out 30+ minutes from the job site to find an acceptable place to live. I miss the schedule, but not the job or rate of pay.
You're going to appreciate that pay when you retire. The last five years before I retired were the highest paying I'd ever had.

What a difference it made. Hang in there. You'll get to retirement age & be able to enjoy your years of work.
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Old 01-15-2018, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,722 posts, read 49,538,109 times
Reputation: 19162
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
Is the natural setting of where you live more important in retirement than while working?
I think so.

When I was working, my career controlled where I worked. I relinquished control of that in favor of my career [and early pension].

Now that I am retired, I get to live anywhere that I want to live.

We decided long ago that when I retired we wanted to live out in the country on an off-grid farm in a forest. So that was what we did after I retired.
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