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Old 01-17-2018, 07:48 AM
 
6,220 posts, read 4,718,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slyfox2 View Post
..... Plus when you are old, people think you are also stupid.

That has not been my experience. Employers are seeking people with skills, experience and knowledge. Many of us continue to grow in those areas.
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Old 01-17-2018, 08:55 AM
 
251 posts, read 113,329 times
Reputation: 404
When I am over 65 I will only be doing part-time consulting and in another country.
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Old 01-17-2018, 11:08 AM
 
6,875 posts, read 7,270,643 times
Reputation: 9785
Quote:
You posted your honest experience, and then some respondents indicated you were wrong and/or its your fault.
Are we not responsible for OUR OWN actions? That's not 'blaming.'
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Old 01-17-2018, 11:18 AM
 
Location: California
4,552 posts, read 5,466,666 times
Reputation: 9608
Quote:
Originally Posted by selhars View Post
It's really a shame when people pout and pick up their marbles and go home.

All threads and experiences are learning opportunities for someone. We all learn from each other -- IF we're willing.
And of course, unfortunately, some are not.

I think the OP has brought to light an an important issue for some people: going back to work either for the wrong reasons, reasons that the person him- or herself isn't sure about, or just perhaps picking the wrong job.

But sometimes we just don't know those things before hand. Sometimes all we can do is make the best decision with the information we have at the time.
And, if we've done our best due diligence, there's nothing wrong with things not working out. It happens.

A separate issue all together is how the person feels about the ramifications of the situation.
Seems to be a pattern for some.
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Old 01-17-2018, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Mount Airy, Maryland
10,459 posts, read 5,920,270 times
Reputation: 16151
Quote:
Originally Posted by BabyJuly View Post
I hear you. You posted your honest experience, and then some respondents indicated you were wrong and/or its your fault. It happens to the OP on every practically Retirement thread.

I felt so burnt out after leaving my job, I have not looked for another one. I completely lost interest in my career and work. I would have felt exactly as you did on Day 1.
Again the issue is not that he felt this way after day one, it's that he certainly should have considered this as a very real possibility before accepting the job. Taking a job and then quitting the first day for feelings he should have anticipated is terribly inconsiderate and unprofessional.
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Old 01-17-2018, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Eugene, Oregon
9,125 posts, read 2,996,123 times
Reputation: 13763
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr5150 View Post
Last summer, I took a temporary job as a church secretary as a favor to the pastor and head elder. Both friends, but not my primary church. They wanted me to fill in until they found a permanent secretary. It was five days a week for two months. I was happy to help, but it did mess up my retirement flow/routine. From now on, I’ll only take a job out of necessity, not for something to do.
I was once asked to temporarily take over the instructional duties of a couple of graduate teaching fellows (GTFs), plus those of several undergraduate trainees, at a large university. This was to be for just two or three weeks, until the regular, incoming personnel could take up their assignments.

Fast-forward three years and I was still there, doing this and the duties had expanded a lot. No GTFs or trainees ever materialized. And this was a volunteer position-----no pay or benefits were given. I was asked to do it, because I had a lot of experience in the field and was good at giving beginning-level instruction to students. It took up about four hours of my time, every afternoon and I worked a split-shift, at my regular job of self-employment.

I'll never know if the administration planned it this way from the beginning. It certainly helped their budget problems in the department. But then, as a reward for my contribution and proven ability, they offered me a GTF position for the next year, to work for an advanced degree and get paid a bit. I was quite elated and gratified, as I knew I had paid my dues, to get that appointment. I would have been doing the same things I did as a volunteer, plus running a small student activity center and taking graduate classes, myself.

But then, a stealth takeover in the State Legislature, put control into the hands of a faction determined to chop the budget, especially for higher-education. Our entire section of the department was eliminated and all faculty and GTFs had to find other universities. My teaching fellowship evaporated and they even tore down the room where I had conducted classes and had built many modifications.

However, I was glad for the experience and satisfaction of doing a good job, despite the ending. But a lesson learned, is that those who recruit for "short-term" volunteers, may have longer periods of duty in mind. If you do well as a volunteer and cost them nothing, they will gladly extend your tenure indefinitely.
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Old 01-17-2018, 04:23 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
7,609 posts, read 4,680,291 times
Reputation: 27841
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovnova View Post
Before I retired I worked in a major metropolitan area. My work was very specialized and I worked with certain specific software that pertained to that work. The work was very grueling and tedious. But rewarding by the good pay and satisfaction with the end results. But after about 12 years of it I was fried.
I stopped that work and retired - moved away to a smaller city.
So I see this add on a local job board for a company looking for someone with knowledge and experience with that software I previously worked with. I'm sure I was the only one within 200 miles that had experience with it. Fast forward I interviewed, they made me a good offer the same day. I accepted.
Went in the first day. Fired up the computer and there is the program. I open it up and start thinking what the hell am I doing here. I finished out the day. Called the owner the next morning and told him I would not be a fit for the position etc..
What a big mistake just taking the job because I was a expert with that software. Did not think it through.

Anyone else ever done this in retirement? I feel like a ass.
Sorry about those who jumped on you. There are always people who need to feel superior. And you did say you feel bad about it.

The question, of course, is why you interviewed for the job when you were retired. Did you need the money? Or maybe you needed to feel needed? I can certainly understand that if it's the case. I've been out of the workforce since 2001. I run my own business. But when the CEO of a chain of fabric/crafts stores found me online and extended an invitation to come interview at his corporate office because of certain skills I have, I was tempted. It could have ended just as disastrously as your abortive return to work did. But I like being my own boss so I just thanked him for the compliment.

You didn't say how long you'd been retired before you interviewed. Some people don't know what to do with themselves at first in retirement.
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Old 01-18-2018, 05:32 AM
 
Location: Mount Airy, Maryland
10,459 posts, read 5,920,270 times
Reputation: 16151
Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post
Sorry about those who jumped on you. There are always people who need to feel superior. And you did say you feel bad about it.
I'm really beginning to resent comments like this. Posting the opinion that someone was wrong in their actions is not acting out of a need to feel superior, you have no right to make that claim and it's totally unfair.

The OP chose to put his story out there. When you do that you should be prepared to hear from others who do not agree with your actions. Obviously this poster was not prepared as he took his ball and went home. That's fine but it's simply not fair for you to claim we are sharing our opinion out of some sort of perceived need to feel superior.
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Old 01-18-2018, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
7,609 posts, read 4,680,291 times
Reputation: 27841
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveinMtAiry View Post
I'm really beginning to resent comments like this. Posting the opinion that someone was wrong in their actions is not acting out of a need to feel superior, you have no right to make that claim and it's totally unfair.
Your opinion that the OP was "wrong" is not just judgmental, it's irrelevant. S/he already said they felt bad about it. S/he did not ask whether it was "right" or "wrong".

Quote:
The OP chose to put his story out there. When you do that you should be prepared to hear from others who do not agree with your actions. Obviously this poster was not prepared as he took his ball and went home. That's fine but it's simply not fair for you to claim we are sharing our opinion out of some sort of perceived need to feel superior.
You seem to have missed the point of the OP. Why this person went back and applied for a job very much like one they'd retired from is the actual point of interest. Whether or not s/he is a bad, bad, very bad person is not.
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Old 01-18-2018, 09:44 AM
 
Location: Mount Airy, Maryland
10,459 posts, read 5,920,270 times
Reputation: 16151
Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post
Your opinion that the OP was "wrong" is not just judgmental, it's irrelevant. S/he already said they felt bad about it. S/he did not ask whether it was "right" or "wrong".



You seem to have missed the point of the OP. Why this person went back and applied for a job very much like one they'd retired from is the actual point of interest. Whether or not s/he is a bad, bad, very bad person is not.
Again you are being totally unfair, nobody said the OP was a bad person. There's a difference between being a bad person and making a bad decision. Many of us believe this person made a bad decision and we gave our reasons. That's really all there is to it.

Last edited by DaveinMtAiry; 01-18-2018 at 10:35 AM..
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