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Old 03-08-2018, 07:37 PM
 
651 posts, read 333,211 times
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We just came back from house & community hunting in South West Florida. I know it is in season, but the traffic was terrible in comparison to where we live in NE Florida. We actually drove around from Marco Island up to Estero, many times in 3 days at all hours of the day. Other than that most of the communities that we liked were at least 5 miles to 10 miles from the beach. That is 15 to 25 minutes as I drove. We mainly were looking at the Naples area.

Some other things we noticed is that a lot of the homes still had damage from Irma and had tarps on the roof and missing tiles etc.

In addition to get an evening meal at Carabbas, Bonefish Grill, and other similar places was a 45 - 1 hour wait at the times we wanted to have supper.

On the home front, the houses are well built.

Saying all that, the homes in the price range we were looking are very nice and the developments are also very nice. The communities are well kept and looked after.

Next time we will look in the Venice area, although we drove back through Venice and it was certainly not as nice as Naples.

For the record we did not come across ant roaming Alligators and there were no bugs to speak of. At least not this time of year. we were outside a lot and I never got bitten at all.
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Old 03-09-2018, 03:28 PM
 
15,105 posts, read 3,993,514 times
Reputation: 10945
Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by shokwaverider View Post
We just came back from house & community hunting in South West Florida. I know it is in season, but the traffic was terrible in comparison to where we live in NE Florida. We actually drove around from Marco Island up to Estero, many times in 3 days at all hours of the day. Other than that most of the communities that we liked were at least 5 miles to 10 miles from the beach. That is 15 to 25 minutes as I drove. We mainly were looking at the Naples area.

Some other things we noticed is that a lot of the homes still had damage from Irma and had tarps on the roof and missing tiles etc.

In addition to get an evening meal at Carabbas, Bonefish Grill, and other similar places was a 45 - 1 hour wait at the times we wanted to have supper.

On the home front, the houses are well built.

Saying all that, the homes in the price range we were looking are very nice and the developments are also very nice. The communities are well kept and looked after.

Next time we will look in the Venice area, although we drove back through Venice and it was certainly not as nice as Naples.

For the record we did not come across ant roaming Alligators and there were no bugs to speak of. At least not this time of year. we were outside a lot and I never got bitten at all.
The bugs are not really a problem - unless you sit on the ground somewhere where fire ants are active. Basic spraying on the exterior takes care of most regular ant types. Drywood termites, tho, will definitely eat up parts of houses - you often seen houses "tented" around here (Sarasota)...

Not much damage here from Irma - as you noted, most of it is south.

People have different things in mind when they talk about warm weather and the beach, etc - I've always lived near the water, yet spend very little time on the beach. To me that would be incredibly boring...let alone the effects of the sun, etc.

I like to sail - which I do in Southern New England as well as a small amount here in Florida.

Let's face it. Florida, in general, is the poor man's paradise. Just about anyone can afford to live somewhere in Florida, which is not true of other warm places near water (with services, etc.).

Retirement, to me, means driving as little as possible. It means that going out to dinner is just as good on Wed. evening as it is on Sat (even better, actually, because I hate noise and crowds). I don't remember the last time I waited even 10 minutes for any table...anywhere! This is to say nothing of the (generally bad) quality of food in most eateries. We tend to go out to eat only for the simplicity...or, very occasionally, socially.

Today we had a quick visit to the Mall to return something. This was the first time we've been there in a year (since we bought the item that failed). I was floored at the amount of commercial development which has already taken place - and which is continuing. There seems no end to it.

It it truly amazing that FL. turned down Stim money for a high speed rail line from Orlando to Tampa and possibly to points south. Instead they build 10 lane roads which tend to kill a couple people each day (just in our little area here, let alone elsewhere).

We only winter here (Mid-Dec to Mid-April), but I definitely concur that it starts getting too hot when we leave. Our neighbor - born and bred in Sarasota and lived here his entire working life - leaves for 6 months per year to the Mts. in NC.

Kudos to those few who say they can get accustomed to 90 degree and humid every day. I mean - it's one thing to say "I'll put up with it because it's where I can afford to live/retire" and quite another to advertise it as being capable of comfortable human existence.

Note - if one is directly on the Ocean...it is possible that there are more days where the weather might be bearable. But only a tiny percentage of the population is "on the beach".
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Old 03-10-2018, 08:53 PM
 
1,194 posts, read 585,574 times
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Originally Posted by shokwaverider View Post
The thing we like about Florida that you cannot take away from it, is it's proximity to really nice beaches with agreeable water temperatures. For the most part, living within 5 miles of one of them is very affordable for the average middle to upper middle class retiree.

We also like the fact that you can still get into a nice community for a "Reasonable" price in a low crime and COL location without being house poor. I say reasonable in quotes as this is subjective. But I just checked the estimates for Net Worth of the "Average" retired American Middle to Upper Middle Class family between the ages of 55-64 is $843k on the low end and $2.8m on the high end. We fall into this category and enjoy a very good standard of living in a nice area in NW Florida.

$400 - $600k buys a modest home those areas, the home size and location depends on the price of course. If you wish to pay more than that life gets even better. But we do not want a huge home in our retirement and we can settle for something in the 2,300 - 2,700sqft range for a SF Home or ~2,000sqft for a condo. Our current home is 3,500sqft SF. and we are looking to downsize and lose the pool. Hence the SW Florida search.

Based on our last 13 years here in Florida I would say you need an income of about $45k pa. after Taxes, with your home fully paid for to really enjoy the Florida lifestyle. This is substantially less than the same lifestyle in SoCAL or Hawaii.


There is NO report that I've ever seen in the past 3 years saying the average Retired middle class to upper middle class family has at least $843K in net worth!! How when wages have not gone up in over a decade and college costs for children are much worse would any family have a minimum is over $800K!
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Old 03-10-2018, 08:56 PM
 
1,194 posts, read 585,574 times
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Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
New Mexico offers a great four season climate without the extreme heat and crowds of sun baked retirees in tennis shorts. The problem for some is the elevation— Albuquerque is a mile high and Santa Fe is 7,000 ft. Winters are mild unless you are up in the mountains in ski areas. High desert appeals to some people as does the diversity that comes with the native Indian and historic Spanish cultural mix. Cost of living is low to average depending on where you live. I’m from the Midwest but fell in love with the high desert and open spaces of New Mexico. Healthcare is certainly adequate in the cities but can be sparse in rural areas. Cultural opportunities are wide ranging — in Santa Fe and Albuquerque especially. The Railrunner commuter train between Santa Fe and Albuquerque (and as far south as Belen) is free to seniors on most Wednesdays and cheaper than driving and parking any day. To people accustomed to the extreme heat of Arizona it might seem too cool. To people accustomed to green lawns, beaches, or huge cities it might seem too dry or undeveloped. It sort of fits in the Goldilocks position for some people - most of my neighbors are Eastern transplants or from the west coast.

Albuquerque is 6,000 feet above sea level. Albuquerque is very affordable but Santa Fe housing costs is like Miami Beach or Seattle.
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Old 03-11-2018, 01:10 AM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
4,366 posts, read 1,660,383 times
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Come on, you guys. This chart says Kentucky is the worst state in the USA to be retired in, all the rest are better. According to the last census, there are 578,227 people living in Kentucky who are over 65. For the most part, they are doing just fine. Some are downright happy.

Do you really think that the life of a retired person can be improved appreciably just by moving to another state?

Kentucky's a pretty sate, green and rolling, has some nice towns. Cost of living can't be all that high. Climate is middling, with no extremes. How bad would it really be if you wee told you HAD to retire in Kentucky?

Quit worrying about petty differences.. Just go and retire somewhere, put your feet up, call it home and learn to like it.
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Old 03-11-2018, 06:01 AM
 
11,969 posts, read 5,106,726 times
Reputation: 18703
Quote:
Originally Posted by cebuan View Post
Come on, you guys. This chart says Kentucky is the worst state in the USA to be retired in, all the rest are better. According to the last census, there are 578,227 people living in Kentucky who are over 65. For the most part, they are doing just fine. Some are downright happy.

Do you really think that the life of a retired person can be improved appreciably just by moving to another state?

Kentucky's a pretty sate, green and rolling, has some nice towns. Cost of living can't be all that high. Climate is middling, with no extremes. How bad would it really be if you wee told you HAD to retire in Kentucky?

Quit worrying about petty differences.. Just go and retire somewhere, put your feet up, call it home and learn to like it.
Personally and this is selfish on my part, I hope KY keeps making the list of places not to retire in. It helps to keep the home prices down as well as the property taxes.
My goal is to retire there in 3-4 years. I can afford to buy a nice little or even large old house in a well maintained historic district in a beautiful town such as Maysville. I can give up the car and walk to almost everything I want and public transportation is "free" to seniors. There's a good hospital, golf courses, good restaurants, everything I would want or need. Lexington and Cincinnati are only an hour away if I ever need more. I think I'll be just fine there.
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