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Old 01-22-2018, 01:56 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
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A good source of free boxes in useful sizes and shapes is the local liquor store. Most booze comes in boxes that are good for packing household items. In a couple of weeks, they will give you more boxes than you need, probably.
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Old 01-22-2018, 03:25 PM
 
Location: Cochise county, AZ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M3 Mitch View Post
A good source of free boxes in useful sizes and shapes is the local liquor store. Most booze comes in boxes that are good for packing household items. In a couple of weeks, they will give you more boxes than you need, probably.
And, since they are heavy duty, usually, if not always, would be a convenient size.
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Old 01-22-2018, 04:07 PM
 
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Originally Posted by M3 Mitch View Post
A good source of free boxes in useful sizes and shapes is the local liquor store. Most booze comes in boxes that are good for packing household items. In a couple of weeks, they will give you more boxes than you need, probably.

Agreed. Booze containers for books and the small and heavy items. Banana boxes for the lightweight items.
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Old 01-22-2018, 06:24 PM
 
Location: Vermont
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Since 2014, I have moved from Vermont to Massachusetts, from Massachusetts to Oregon, and from Oregon back to Vermont. I am 66 years old. I had a dog and a cat for each move; the cat sadly passed away a year ago, I still have my dog. I would never consider giving up my pets for any reason. Take a look in a shelter sometime (or better yet, at the outside after a kill day, where the bodies are all heaped up)...there are thousands of cats and dogs that languish in shelters and are then euthanized for lack of people wanting to adopt them. Chances are, no one will adopt your cats.

But there are many subsidized senior housing authorities that are good landlords and allow pets. I can recommend Cathedral Square in Vermont. Yes, the waiting lists are long but it costs nothing to apply. I was lucky to get into a nice building after only two years. It doesn't always matter where your place is on the list; what matters is to always update your application every year when you get a letter, because you would be surprised at how quickly the list grows shorter as people tire of waiting, move elsewhere, don't respond to the annual letter, etc. I have zero issues with maintenance here. One phone call and they are here the next day to fix any problems. I can have up to two pets, no monthly fee.

Decide on the area you want to live in, and then apply and get on every list you can find. Don't worry about your cats until you get a call that an apartment is available and then ask about your cats.

If you decide to move long distance, get rid of your big heavy stuff if you can buy the same where you are going for what it's worth. I used a U-Pack pod coming back from Oregon and was amazed at how much it could hold. I hired movers to carry the stuff to and from the pod in each location, didn't cost more than $100 each time plus the price of the shipping container, which was around $1500 from Oregon to Vermont.

The best advice I can give you is get on every list you can find in every state where you think you might want to live. The applications are really all the same, so just copy all the info from one to the other. Most of them can be downloaded from property management websites.

Another thing to check is the contract termination date for any HUD subsidized complex. Don't take any apartment with a short contract termination date, as the management can go market-rate and by law you only have one year to find new housing. You can check the HUD contract termination dates by calling the HUD regional office in the location you are considering.

Good luck finding a better location!
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