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Old 01-24-2018, 06:14 AM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,579 posts, read 62,388,709 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
...to grow more and more dissatisfied with your job and working?
Your experience?
For those who never really enjoyed their work? Sure; especially so.

This is why the advocates of the "work til I die" approach don't count in the discussion.
Money aside they genuinely enjoy what they do and get great satisfaction doing it.
And of course it always seems to have great income and benefits too.
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Old 01-24-2018, 06:17 AM
 
4,496 posts, read 4,760,242 times
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I think every work setting has its problems.


Working in a hospital for 40yrs., all the ancillary services are always a mess and constant headache to deal with. Also, the shift work, doubles, doubling back on 8/12hr shifts, ugh! I am within a yearr. of retirement and it can't come soon enough, have had it with all of it. I understand.
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Old 01-24-2018, 06:43 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
Also, I think you start to feel like, so what if I don't tolerate X or don't stay quiet about Y? What are they going to do, fire me?


Yes, that is what I want to do. I work in Psych. too, like you. If I said what was thinking.... so fire me.
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Old 01-24-2018, 06:59 AM
 
13,352 posts, read 25,621,216 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
...
This is why the advocates of the "work til I die" approach don't count in the discussion.
Money aside they genuinely enjoy what they do and get great satisfaction doing it.
And of course it always seems to have great income and benefits too.
Seems that engineers are foremost in this group. It's a mindset- if you have interesting problems to solve, that's a good job, especially if left alone by management as much as possible. Not too many jobs are like that except for engineering, I think.

I haven't heard too many nurses talk about this "problem," although I know people are still trying their best to do their jobs. Electronic medical records, while really good for information, have taken away a lot from patient interaction and time, and some older RNs really dislike this. Me, I like having the info available and readable, but I've always been adept at compressing info and finding it useful.

I know a lot of people fear retirement=death, as irrational as I find that. So that could be part of work 'til you die. I point out that people often retire when they have bad medical news. What is it, correlation is not causation?
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Old 01-24-2018, 06:59 AM
 
7,838 posts, read 4,419,759 times
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I have a friend who was fired a year away from full retirement and his pension; had to scramble to find another job to qualify.

It's even worse for me because I technically can retire (am staying on a little longer for other reasons). So the "f**k it" is strong here.

But more and more I feel I can't work and also live my life; the former is interfering too much with the latter. Or maybe I'm just getting old and tired?

Of course if your work is your play (you love it and would do it even if you weren't paid to or you had to pay them in order to do it), then of course you'll continue forever, never retire, and love it; that would be called a "hobby" or "vocation" and not "just a job." But few of us are that fortunate; I know I haven't been.
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Old 01-24-2018, 07:13 AM
 
7,838 posts, read 4,419,759 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brava4 View Post
Yes, that is what I want to do. I work in Psych. too, like you. If I said what was thinking.... so fire me.
Actually, assuming you qualify for retirement and don't HAVE to keep working...what happens if they DO fire you before you quit? Can you collect unemployment benefits until they run out and THEN retire? Hmmm...
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Old 01-24-2018, 07:27 AM
 
6,341 posts, read 4,774,534 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
Seems that engineers are foremost in this group. It's a mindset- if you have interesting problems to solve, that's a good job, especially if left alone by management as much as possible. Not too many jobs are like that except for engineering, I think.
.....
Lots of careers can provide intense satisfaction. Science, technology, engineering and math can do that. I see others who are in the humanities, teaching, management, business, sales, art, architecture, and many other fields who feel the same way. Many of us eventually wear out or burn out. Some people end up in the wrong career. I know I would never be able to handle a career in nursing. Some are not happy regardless of their career choice.
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Old 01-24-2018, 07:28 AM
 
7,838 posts, read 4,419,759 times
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Some are not fortunate -- or successful -- enough to make a living doing what makes them happy. Again, hence "hobbies," for which retirement allows more time.
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Old 01-24-2018, 07:35 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in deep in Maine
3,665 posts, read 2,823,764 times
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Part of working is planning for the future, and what you will be doing next year, building on what you are doing this year.

But you donít have that. In my case, I did the job so well that everyone thought it was easy to do. So when I left they gave my two associates my job too. How hard could it be considering it seemed so easy for me, right? My two associates knew, and they refused to meet with me because they didnít want to hit the ground running. They had enough to do already and didnít want my job too, so they needed to show how hard it was.

That lasted a year. Their bosses petitioned the higher ups to bring my position back.

But I knew all this, and so nothing I did was important during the last 6 months. Its hard to work in a job where they are not going to replace you when you are gone.
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Old 01-24-2018, 07:39 AM
 
4,496 posts, read 4,760,242 times
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I think some are "fed" by the day to day work. Not necessarily the job but the need for contact, feeling needed, no matter what, and I know of at least 2 people at work who just don't want to be at home due to other family members or family situations. which i think is really sad.
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