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Old 02-01-2018, 07:43 AM
 
Location: SE corner of the Ozark Redoubt
2,813 posts, read 944,849 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
And...bugs are everywhere, including the desert, unless you live in a heavily urbanized area.

Just a few of the bugs that exist in dry regions: yellowjackets, paper wasps, chinch beetles, dung beetles, several kinds of biting flies, kissing bugs, cedar gnats, moths, ticks, locusts, grasshoppers...
Bugs are a necessary part of the ecosystem. Without them locally, things would be a mess, without them globally, all life would die off.

The question is, which kind of bugs do you want to avoid?
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Old 02-01-2018, 10:59 AM
 
1,357 posts, read 662,229 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TRex2 View Post
Bugs are a necessary part of the ecosystem. Without them locally, things would be a mess, without them globally, all life would die off.

The question is, which kind of bugs do you want to avoid?
Ugly biting ones
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Old 02-01-2018, 07:46 PM
 
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Exactly!
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Old 02-02-2018, 03:22 PM
 
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It has been really nice not dealing with mosquitos, roaches, scorpions, and snakes since we moved to Colorado. Back in TX, we gave up going outside in the summer as the mosquitos and heat were relentless. IMO there is a downside to fewer insects though - fewer birds
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Old 02-04-2018, 02:50 PM
 
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I am told that where I'm moving to in Colorado, at 7,000 feet, the dogs will not need flea/tick preventative. They will need Heartguard, but not because of heart worms- I'm told there is some sort of tapeworm kind of thing that Heartguard will also prevent.

Just not buying flea/tick med year 'round for multiple dogs is a big savings.

I currently live 50' from a wetland area. In my former cottage on the same spot, I had clouds of mosquitos in the summer. In my new house on the same spot, I have almost none. I think there must have been some sort of wet areas under the cottage or something.
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Old 02-04-2018, 03:16 PM
 
5,478 posts, read 2,865,525 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
I am told that where I'm moving to in Colorado, at 7,000 feet, the dogs will not need flea/tick preventative. They will need Heartguard, but not because of heart worms- I'm told there is some sort of tapeworm kind of thing that Heartguard will also prevent.

Just not buying flea/tick med year 'round for multiple dogs is a big savings.

I currently live 50' from a wetland area. In my former cottage on the same spot, I had clouds of mosquitos in the summer. In my new house on the same spot, I have almost none. I think there must have been some sort of wet areas under the cottage or something.

When we lived at 7300+ elevation, also in CO, our vet said DO use flea and tick prevention. I have had a tick drop off a tree onto my arm at even higher elevation, in RMNP. A coworker had warned me about ticks in trees, and it was NOT a myth!
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Old 02-04-2018, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Maui, Hawaii
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We didn't really consider it though we'd heard horrible stories of the usual biting, stinging, infestations, molds and other nasty stuff. Luckily we live in the super dry area of the island so no mosquitos, gnats, black flies or the like but we do see an occasional scorpion, centipede, cockroach and a few small (but not biting) ants.

No snakes in Hawaii so that's nice but the 'little fire ant' is starting to be a problem in some parts of the state and the screaming coqui frogs too but not in our area yet.
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Old 02-04-2018, 05:14 PM
 
13,350 posts, read 25,617,103 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
When we lived at 7300+ elevation, also in CO, our vet said DO use flea and tick prevention. I have had a tick drop off a tree onto my arm at even higher elevation, in RMNP. A coworker had warned me about ticks in trees, and it was NOT a myth!
There won't be many trees around but I don't want to take any chances. My new vet is right down the street and I'll ask her again when I arrive.
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Old 02-05-2018, 06:46 AM
 
1,137 posts, read 572,760 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
When we lived at 7300+ elevation, also in CO, our vet said DO use flea and tick prevention. I have had a tick drop off a tree onto my arm at even higher elevation, in RMNP. A coworker had warned me about ticks in trees, and it was NOT a myth!
I agree, and it's good to be cautious. We lived at a lower elevation, ~6000 feet, on the road to Estes Park. When I would go down to clear the brush and thistles on my property once a year, I would inevitably find dog and wood ticks crawling up my legs after the ordeal. I was surprised because the brush wasn't that high and seemed dead. But the thing was there were lots of mule deer around.

Anywhere there is lunch...there will be diners.
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Old 02-05-2018, 07:45 AM
 
5,478 posts, read 2,865,525 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichiganGreg View Post
I agree, and it's good to be cautious. We lived at a lower elevation, ~6000 feet, on the road to Estes Park. When I would go down to clear the brush and thistles on my property once a year, I would inevitably find dog and wood ticks crawling up my legs after the ordeal. I was surprised because the brush wasn't that high and seemed dead. But the thing was there were lots of mule deer around.

Anywhere there is lunch...there will be diners.
Yes, mule deer carry ticks, and so do rodents, rabbits and hares, stray dogs, wild canids.

Rattlesnakes are also common in dry, rocky, hilly areas. Dogs nosing around off trail sometimes get bitten by them.
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