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Old 02-07-2018, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Pure Michigan!
4,352 posts, read 7,454,909 times
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To those who say that you just need to treat your house and/or lawn to keep the bugs at bay, what do you do about those bugs that aren't confined to your personal property?

We were in Jekyll Island, GA almost exactly two years ago and the sand gnats were horrific and they were everywhere, there was no escaping them. They crawled up our shirt sleeves and crawled through our hair, and their bite was very irritating. There were several on our bodies at a time so swatting at them didn't do much good because while you were swatting one on your arm, another one was biting your face, etc.

Ditto the no see ums in Charleston, SC when we were there a few years ago in September. They were absolutely everywhere and biting, even on a boat out in Charleston Harbor.

DH and I aren't quite retirement age yet and we will most likely be snowbirds someday as opposed to full-time residents in a warm area because it is so agreeable here from April-October, but I think it would be frustrating to move somewhere warm with the intention of spending a lot of time outdoors, only to find that you get chewed alive by bugs the whole time you're out and about. You can treat your house for palmetto bugs and your yard for fire ants, but you can't treat the land and air in an entire region.

We own a condo in a beach resort in Myrtle Beach that we use a couple of times a year and rent out the rest of the time. We talk about selling it someday and buying something somewhere with a more laid back vibe instead, like Hilton Head or Isle of Palms. One thing, though, I have to say for Myrtle Beach, is that as many times as we have been there, we have never once encountered a no see um or sand gnat, or really any bugs to speak of. I wonder why that is, if it's just a little too far north for those critters or if we've just been lucky and been there at the right times?
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Old 02-07-2018, 10:00 AM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,458 posts, read 1,691,680 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canudigit View Post
To those who say that you just need to treat your house and/or lawn to keep the bugs at bay, what do you do about those bugs that aren't confined to your personal property?

We were in Jekyll Island, GA almost exactly two years ago and the sand gnats were horrific and they were everywhere, there was no escaping them. They crawled up our shirt sleeves and crawled through our hair, and their bite was very irritating. There were several on our bodies at a time so swatting at them didn't do much good because while you were swatting one on your arm, another one was biting your face, etc.

Ditto the no see ums in Charleston, SC when we were there a few years ago in September. They were absolutely everywhere and biting, even on a boat out in Charleston Harbor.

DH and I aren't quite retirement age yet and we will most likely be snowbirds someday as opposed to full-time residents in a warm area because it is so agreeable here from April-October, but I think it would be frustrating to move somewhere warm with the intention of spending a lot of time outdoors, only to find that you get chewed alive by bugs the whole time you're out and about. You can treat your house for palmetto bugs and your yard for fire ants, but you can't treat the land and air in an entire region.

We own a condo in a beach resort in Myrtle Beach that we use a couple of times a year and rent out the rest of the time. We talk about selling it someday and buying something somewhere with a more laid back vibe instead, like Hilton Head or Isle of Palms. One thing, though, I have to say for Myrtle Beach, is that as many times as we have been there, we have never once encountered a no see um or sand gnat, or really any bugs to speak of. I wonder why that is, if it's just a little too far north for those critters or
It may be that you’ve been lucky the times you have been there, but I’m not familiar with that area. There are no-see-ums here in SWFL at different times of the year. We rarely have them at our house being close to the coast where it is breezy. There have been a couple of times when it was a still night and I felt sharp bites, and it took a few to realize a pattern, and we shut the windows and doors. We also got home at dusk from our local ferry to the beach and the no-see-ums were in the mangroves and and on us as we unlocked our bikes. As soon as we got riding and created wind, they disappeared.

One of the worst nights I’ve spent was on the Outer Banks in NC in a camper when I was a kid. It was hot at night, the windows were open and the no-see-ums came right through the screens. We didn’t have AC in the camper at that time, so the choice was to close the windows and sweat to death, or open them and be bit to death. We alternated and didn’t get a lot of sleep. That was our first experience with them. We had camped there before without any problems in past years.
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Old 02-09-2018, 07:00 PM
 
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I had to look up what a no-see-um was. For anyone else that was wondering, they are little biting gnats and a member of the fly family.
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Old 02-09-2018, 07:07 PM
 
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For anyone interested here are the top ten states for mosquitoes according to a pest control organization. Of course Florida is #1.
https://www.pestcontrolreviews.com/t...or-mosquitoes/
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Old 02-09-2018, 07:10 PM
 
Location: Living rent free in your head
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Reno Nevada! As much as I didn't like living in Reno it is hands down the most bug free zone I have ever lived in. It's a dry climate and it's windy. No fleas, flies or mosquitoes. The only bugs I saw there were some squash bugs and a baby tarantula.
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Old 02-10-2018, 06:11 AM
 
Location: Pure Michigan!
4,352 posts, read 7,454,909 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jean_ji View Post
It may be that you’ve been lucky the times you have been there, but I’m not familiar with that area. There are no-see-ums here in SWFL at different times of the year. We rarely have them at our house being close to the coast where it is breezy. There have been a couple of times when it was a still night and I felt sharp bites, and it took a few to realize a pattern, and we shut the windows and doors. We also got home at dusk from our local ferry to the beach and the no-see-ums were in the mangroves and and on us as we unlocked our bikes. As soon as we got riding and created wind, they disappeared.

One of the worst nights I’ve spent was on the Outer Banks in NC in a camper when I was a kid. It was hot at night, the windows were open and the no-see-ums came right through the screens. We didn’t have AC in the camper at that time, so the choice was to close the windows and sweat to death, or open them and be bit to death. We alternated and didn’t get a lot of sleep. That was our first experience with them. We had camped there before without any problems in past years.
I have heard that no-see-ums can come right through window screens so it seems that when they are out and about the only option would be to stay inside an air conditioned building with the windows closed, which is a shame because having the windows open to catch balmy breezes through the window screens seems like it would be one of the biggest draws of living somewhere warm and close to the coast.

The bite of a no-see-um is truly painful for such a tiny insect and the way that they will climb up inside your nose and ears and down through your hair to get to your scalp is maddening. I had heard about them ever since visiting the SC Low Country for the first time on our honeymoon back in 1988 but only experienced them in recent years. They are horrible!
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Old 02-10-2018, 07:30 AM
 
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Sounds like black-flies...they are brutal compared to mosquitoes.
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Old 02-10-2018, 07:53 AM
 
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No-see-ums do not hurt at all when they bite, they do itch for about 4 days after though. Deer flies Bite a chunk out of you. They particularly like "Northern" Flesh & Blood. There is an agency down here where you can hire them out to put off the Snowbirds who are looking to relocate.
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Old 02-10-2018, 08:41 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichiganGreg View Post
Sounds like black-flies...they are brutal compared to mosquitoes.
No, biting gnats in the Atlantic SE coastal area are very different from black flies. Bites from the latter are far worse and itch for much longer. Also, you do not feel a black fly biting; you definitely feel the tiny pinch when a gnat bites.
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Old 02-10-2018, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Pure Michigan!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shokwaverider View Post
No-see-ums do not hurt at all when they bite, they do itch for about 4 days after though. Deer flies Bite a chunk out of you. They particularly like "Northern" Flesh & Blood. There is an agency down here where you can hire them out to put off the Snowbirds who are looking to relocate.
Interesting. Our tour guide told us they were sand gnats, isn't that the same thing as a no-see-um? That's what I found when I looked them up online.

Regardless, their bite was definitely painful, as I would have expected since sand gnats are blood sucking vectors.
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