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Old 02-05-2018, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Texas or Cascais, Portugal
3,415 posts, read 3,180,630 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by don1945 View Post
I've tried retirement twice, didn't work for me. It felt like I was closing the book of my life, final chapter, the end. Found out I missed the work I was doing, it was stimulating and good for my physical health as well. In the 4.5 years I was retired, I aged mentally and physically more than if I was active and working.

I can see how some people would enjoy not having to get up every day and go to the same old grind, and that is fine. I just found it boring as Hell.
I know a lot of similar folks who thrive at work. I have worked in many disciplines in my life, some jobs I enjoyed more than others but, I can honestly say, after working 43 years, I have NEVER looked forward to going to work!
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Old 02-05-2018, 09:08 AM
 
2,563 posts, read 1,020,324 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nurider2002 View Post
I know a lot of similar folks who thrive at work. I have worked in many disciplines in my life, some jobs I enjoyed more than others but, I can honestly say, after working 43 years, I have NEVER looked forward to going to work!
I have been blessed to have had a great job, one that has brought me much intrinsic satisfaction. But I'm still looking forward to the next chapter in my life..
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Old 02-05-2018, 11:19 AM
 
28,237 posts, read 39,879,137 times
Reputation: 36740
Quote:
Originally Posted by runswithscissors View Post
That's debatable since you said you didn't "think" they planned on anything.



That's just your opinion. You're not the first to have it or the last.

You state they didn't PLAN, then later you said "I don't think it was in our parent's case". That their plan was to do nothing. Post number 7






This indicates to me you weren't very close and just because you don't approve of them becoming social butterflies AFTER retirement doesn't make them WRONG in any way.

Anyway, you've given zero details about the people so there are definitely factors not in evidence. We know NOTHING about them except that they're a couple of straw men put up for us to knock down.

IE They never were PLANNERS or social butterflies all their lives anyway. Maybe they ate crap all their lives like most of the country and had physical issues that prevented them from having energy and stamina. Maybe they had no activities all their lives that you'd approve of anyway, and WANTED to enjoy their homes after a life time of being OUT of them working or not taking vacations or whatever.

Most likely they lived their retirement years EXACTLY how they lived their pre-retirement years in terms of your opinions of being "active".

Who knows.

So you're saying they were vibrant pictures of activity and health pre-retirement and after retirement it because all downhill because of television?

What is your age?

Everyone thinks they know what the preceding generation did wrong. Especially when it comes to family dynamics.

But this thread is making me laugh.

You said yourself you are NOT ACTIVE NOW but plan to be when you retire.

'mmmkay.

ETA: Protip: You can't/don't suddenly become healthy and active AFTER retirement in most cases. What's YOUR lipid panel, BP and glucose?
Quote:
Originally Posted by runswithscissors View Post
Seriously?

These threads always deteriorate to bashing strangers' lifestyles ad infinitum. Actually no, more like reductio ad absurdum

Nobody is forcing anyone to ride bikes or eat sushi.

And ICYMI, most 55+ HOAs have very active card and tennis players and it would be really difficult to FORCE people to play them, too.

It's hilarious irony to me that as a self professed TV watcher, who wants to stay in the their house with busy work "projects", that you'd find a way to criticize active people living their lives riding bikes and socializing.

Also it appears they are not your "friends". Why so mad they moved to a 55+? Nobody is forcing them to stay behind gates or not allowing you in there to "socialize" with them, right?

Human nature. Gotta love it.
Yes. Yes they do. And here is a perfect example of that deterioration.
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Old 02-05-2018, 11:24 AM
 
7,899 posts, read 5,031,079 times
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It’s a recurring topic. Yet another variant is that of hard-charging career-oriented people who save voraciously, invest, and retire early – only to find themselves listless and maladapted to their new circumstances. The problem isn’t lack of capacity for occupying one’s time, but in finding substantive meaning, wherein one feels engaged, contributing, significant. This is especially so, I think, for persons who retired from positions of power; and doubly especially so, for when “retirement” is peremptory and involuntary (career-politician goes down for an ethics violation, lawyer gets disbarred, university professor gets fired for sexual harassment, etc.). Then, the problem becomes one of soul-searching quizzical introspection. A numbing, mindless activity like watching TV, playing games on one’s cell-phone, or just staring out of the bedroom window, becomes a palliative, a source of escape – even if its stimulative value is nil.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Clemencia53 View Post
What if your passion was to "drift through life"?
Whimsy aside, that’s actually a profound question. Over in the philosophy forum, there’s been penetrating (and occasionally trenchant) discussion about appetite, drive, desire for bigger/better/grander. But what it’s it all a ruse and an addiction? Sure, it’s great to cure cancer and to attain world-peace. But even the vast majority of cancer-researchers are mainly on the treadmill of securing funding and publishing more papers. Their capacity to really advance the cause of a cure, is minuscule. Why not then practice a live-and-let-live passivity? Is this somehow cowardly, contemptible, degenerate? Or is it, on the contrary, more enlightened?

Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post
I've been waiting for retirement since the first day I ever went to work.
This applies to many of us. As a young man, I’d regularly update my list of hobbies and avocations that personally defined me, that I’d love to advance, were I to have had more free-time. This list was fairly robust through my mid-30s. In my 40s, the list became abandoned, and atrophied. It started to feel quaint, even sophomoric. The irony is, that our desire to engage in something is often in inverse proportion to our capacity to actually do it. Gain the capacity, and the desire wanes.
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Old 02-05-2018, 04:07 PM
 
1,560 posts, read 775,311 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lizap View Post
We have known so many people who retire and 'waste' away by watching TV or becoming couch potatoes. For many years, we have searched, by travelling, to look for our retirement location. We plan to lead an active retirement life, by playing tennis, cards, going to social events, etc... We have bought property in a gated development that has a club and sponsors many activities. We have friends and relatives that don't think about these things (pre-retirement). Is this typical or are we weird?
Retirement means being able to do what you want to do, within your means and abilities. If those people just want to be couch potatoes it's their decision. No skin off anyone else's nose.
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Old 02-05-2018, 04:23 PM
 
2,563 posts, read 1,020,324 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CatTX View Post
Retirement means being able to do what you want to do, within your means and abilities. If those people just want to be couch potatoes it's their decision. No skin off anyone else's nose.
As I said in an earlier post (I know there are alot of posts to read), "the beauty is that people can do what they choose" (or something like this). But, there is a difference between "this is what I plan to do" and this is what one ends up doing because they havn't given it any thought (not that the latter is inferior for those who responded that they don't/didnt have a plan). I originally asked the question because I was curious if most pre-retirees envision what retirement will look like. In my experience, we had parents and other relatives who I truly believe declined mentally and physically earlier than they would have otherwise, due to their inactivity, as a result, as least in part, to not doing any pre-retirement (or even post-retirement) plannng. This thread has been very enlightening. Thanks to all who responded.
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Old 02-05-2018, 05:01 PM
 
1,560 posts, read 775,311 times
Reputation: 6794
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lizap View Post
As I said in an earlier post (I know there are alot of posts to read), "the beauty is that people can do what they choose" (or something like this). But, there is a difference between "this is what I plan to do" and this is what one ends up doing because they havn't given it any thought (not that the latter is inferior for those who responded that they don't/didnt have a plan). I originally asked the question because I was curious if most pre-retirees envision what retirement will look like. In my experience, we had parents and other relatives who I truly believe declined mentally and physically earlier than they would have otherwise, due to their inactivity, as a result, as least in part, to not doing any pre-retirement (or even post-retirement) plannng. This thread has been very enlightening. Thanks to all who responded.
I see what you are saying. I am not retired, but I agree about the danger of sliding into couch potato mode and declining mentally and physically once work responsibilities are over. But people who are inclined to do that were probably not really interested in making specific plans for retirement and staying active anyway. Nowadays, it is so easy to join gyms, senior workout classes, go on senior tours and generally participate in life after retirement, even without specific plans. I can only presume that those who prefer to stay home just aren't interested in socializing and being active and that is why they don't do it.
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Old 02-05-2018, 08:49 PM
 
Location: WA
878 posts, read 469,605 times
Reputation: 2681
I envision living in a tiny house, all I need is about 500 sq ft. Health insurance, food, and taxes will be paid for with Social Security (if it's still around) and a small pension. I hope I have enough saved to afford a few dogs, several chickens, a couple goats and rent or buy a small plot of land where I can grow some of my own food.

I would like build an energy neutral house and get a couple Tesla Powerwalls and become a recluse with my menagerie. That's pretty much the best case scenario.
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Old 02-05-2018, 10:08 PM
 
2,675 posts, read 4,534,960 times
Reputation: 2131
I look forward to retirement as coming full circle back to a time somewhat like pre-teenage years, where we weren’t working, and could explore so many interesting things—art, music, sports, friendships, cooking, gardening, travel, and any intellectual pursuits, such as learning about architecture, etc.
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Old 02-07-2018, 01:01 PM
 
7,899 posts, read 5,031,079 times
Reputation: 13544
Quote:
Originally Posted by ACWhite View Post
I look forward to retirement as coming full circle back to a time somewhat like pre-teenage years, where we weren’t working, and could explore so many interesting things—art, music, sports, friendships, cooking, gardening, travel, and any intellectual pursuits, such as learning about architecture, etc.
This is a fine and reasonable approach. It nicely encapsulates what so many of us pre-retirees/early-retirees are thinking. The one nuance, is accounting for how we've intellectually and emotionally changed since our childhoods. No, this isn't a silly joke about late-life senility. But the point is, that having gone through decades of shouldering responsibility and so forth, we now entertain the prospect of embracing a care-free, unencumbered life, where our main (only?) responsibility is to decently occupy our own selves. How much of this is liberating, and how much is on the contrary confining?

In working-life, we always have a ready excuse. I'm too busy. I'm too tired. Deadlines, phone calls, forms to be filled out, cantankerous bosses, insufferable coworkers, noises, impediments, fire-drills. Sweep that away, and what's left? In working-life, our excuse is these impediments. The objective is to plead inability to attend to the true fundamentals, because we're mired in distractions.. things of great immediacy, but no lasting importance. Take away those distractions, and what excuse have we, for inadequate or unsatisfying performance at work? Now take away the work itself; what's left?

Hunter-gatherers were busy hunting and gathering. Then came the Neolithic revolution. Farmers got busy farming. Soldiers fought, politicians and priests bloviated. Then came mechanical harvesters, indoor plumbing and smart-phones. Now we're all busy - doing what? If we're sated and secure, what else are we going to do? How many of us are natural poets, learners, contemplatives? How many of us can blissfully prance across a springtime meadow, chasing butterflies? I worry about that. Thus, the inward-turning, to e-mail and the minutiae of tiresome self-justification.
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