U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 02-06-2018, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
21,923 posts, read 14,414,141 times
Reputation: 30876

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
Most of that stuff is not solid silver. It is a thin plating of silver over pot metal.
Not sure what you are referring to. I have a set of sterling silver, bought over a decade or two. It most certainly is not a thin plating over pot metal. Of course in the old days, silverplate was common. But there is plenty of sterling silver flatware out there, undervalued at the moment.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-06-2018, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
21,923 posts, read 14,414,141 times
Reputation: 30876
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
An item being old does not mean it has value. My grandmother has this “record player that is a piece of furniture.” She was convinced it was antique. I found the model # on the unit and its worth about $150.
This is so true! The stuff that brings high dollars might not be intrinsically valuable, but something that a lot of people like to collect. Remember when Avon collectables were expensive? I never understood that fad, but there it was.

I am dealing with the need to get rid of some things. I have some Fostoria that was my grandmother's and I know no one in my family will want it. I have pieces of my mother's china that I don't think anyone will want. It is hard to part with these things, especially since I initially did want these things. But I think I need to let go. I might start with my mom's china.

By the way, on old china that no one wants anymore: if it has family meaning, then take one or two plates and hang them on your wall. That way you have a piece of your family china still. I've done that with my mom's china.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2018, 04:20 PM
 
26,591 posts, read 52,344,141 times
Reputation: 20438
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryleeII View Post


Don't worry about Ebay, what you get isn't worth the fees. Donate it to charity.
One of my car friends that is retired stopped at a estate sale... bought a milk crate full of old license plates... really old... mostly from the teens and plus some special ones from the World's Fair... gave $20 for it.

Some of the plates sold on E-Bay for hundreds of dollars ea... figures that $20 was worth over 10k...

Thing is the person selling was tickled to get $20 for the assortment...

Knowing the true value of the items is necessary but lots of opportunity for those that do...

Last edited by Ultrarunner; 02-06-2018 at 04:34 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2018, 04:31 PM
 
26,591 posts, read 52,344,141 times
Reputation: 20438
Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
This is so true! The stuff that brings high dollars might not be intrinsically valuable, but something that a lot of people like to collect. Remember when Avon collectables were expensive? I never understood that fad, but there it was.

I am dealing with the need to get rid of some things. I have some Fostoria that was my grandmother's and I know no one in my family will want it. I have pieces of my mother's china that I don't think anyone will want. It is hard to part with these things, especially since I initially did want these things. But I think I need to let go. I might start with my mom's china.

By the way, on old china that no one wants anymore: if it has family meaning, then take one or two plates and hang them on your wall. That way you have a piece of your family china still. I've done that with my mom's china.
One of my neighbors had to do the same with her Grandmother's China... was going to put it out on the curb and then I said I will take... she said what for?

Anyway... I helped her pack the China and Silver Flat Ware and Silver Napkin Holders with dates from the late 1800's into two old suitcases that she was also going to toss out... 1950's American Tourister...

Told her two Suitcases isn't going to take up too much room in any home... they sat for 25 years in the garage... untouched.

Last time I saw her she said you are never going to believe what she did with that stuff... I thought throw it out for sure?

She casually mentioned to her Daughter-In-Law who was an adopted child about the two suitcases... they opened them together and her Daughter-In-Law was in awe... she gifted them right then and there and her Daughter-In-Law could not be happier... she said growing up she always felt out of place never having anything in the way of family heirlooms...

She actually uses them too...

I'm sure Great Grandma is smiling somewhere...

One suit case can hold a lot of family history and really isn't much of a bother with a little thought...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2018, 05:04 PM
 
Location: Frederick, Maryland
899 posts, read 479,155 times
Reputation: 2831
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultrarunner View Post
I tend to know a lot of older people... still nice being the "Kid" after all these years.

When I bought my home it was from the original owners and almost all the neighbors were original and ranged in age from 70's to over a 100... actually two neighbors over a 100.

I've seen the joy they have when a grandchild takes an interest in them... could be looking at an old album or grandpa helping to repair something that is broken...

Sadly, there are slowing passing... but so far none have gone to retirement homes except my sellers.

He had some tools and supplies in his workshop... I know one of the reasons they accepted my offer is because of the time he spent showing me some of the things he had made... contrast to one of the offers where the couple kept talking about all the junk and clutter... where as I asked if he would even consider selling his bandsaw and welder... the last things they said on the day I got the keys was they know the place is in good hands and gifted me the tools... the same ones I had asked to buy.

The older you get the more time you have to reflect and no one wants to be irrelevant or worse... something to get rid of or deal with...
Poignantly stated. You’re so right.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2018, 05:47 PM
Status: "0-0-2 Game On!" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
7,311 posts, read 15,366,122 times
Reputation: 9503
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultrarunner View Post
One of my car friends that is retired stopped at a estate sale... bought a milk crate full of old license plates... really old... mostly from the teens and plus some special ones from the World's Fair... gave $20 for it.

Some of the plates sold on E-Bay for hundreds of dollars ea... figures that $20 was worth over 10k...

Thing is the person selling was tickled to get $20 for the assortment...

Knowing the true value of the items is necessary but lots of opportunity for those that do...
My mother-in-law's estate had a bunch of Silver Koala 1 oz silver coins in the plastic NGC cases, "rated" MS70. The local coin store wanted to give me spot + 20% (about $13 total at the time), but I had seen that they were selling on ebay for significantly more than that. I sold about 20 of them on ebay (at between $50-$60) without a serious problem but I'd started to get all kinds of scamming email over them - I'd sold enough that I could easily afford to "lose" 1 or 2 to fraudulent transactions, but I figured it was time to cut and run.

In the meantime we'd moved to a larger city and the coin store here gave me the ebay price I'd been getting less 15% which, by the time I'd paid ebay and Paypal fees, was a much better deal for me. Plus they bought them all, up front and in cash. No more trying to take individual photos of shiny coins and get the NGC serial number.

My point is - I got a much better deal on ebay for the coins I sold BUT it cost me fees, all the trouble to list them and track auctions and and deal with shipping.

The sad part is that I still had the (fairly recent) receipts for my MIL's purchases from a "well-known" coin dealer who really saw her coming and charged over MSRP on them. She'd belonged to several gold bug newsletters and was convinced that only buying precious metals could "save her" from financial ruin.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2018, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Kalamalka Lake, B.C.
3,044 posts, read 4,020,006 times
Reputation: 3898
"Collecting" has gone two directions: the .1 of 1 percent who have the huge money to buy the very, very best, rarest, and fewest, whether coins or cars, art or ancient. And the rest of the crap.

Ever been to an auction lately?? How about TV shows?? Atlanta, Ga. TV show where almost 100 per cent of the public are white and older then me! The new generation and most new arrivals from other cultures simply don't "collect" thangs.

Remember stamps? Old coins? Model Railroad? And don't get me started on furniture. It's the end of an era. The only thin;g to do is appraise for insurance value and hope someone steals it or the place burns down!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2018, 08:02 AM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
7,707 posts, read 4,738,002 times
Reputation: 28255
Quote:
Originally Posted by runswithscissors View Post
Just order a dumpster and start dumping.

Two days and done.
Heh.

When I had to clean out our rental house after the eviction of our hoarder tenants, it took three weeks and four dumpsters.

And they'd taken most of their stuff with them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2018, 08:57 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in America
12,304 posts, read 10,780,142 times
Reputation: 20540
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultrarunner View Post
One of my car friends that is retired stopped at a estate sale... bought a milk crate full of old license plates... really old... mostly from the teens and plus some special ones from the World's Fair... gave $20 for it.

Some of the plates sold on E-Bay for hundreds of dollars ea... figures that $20 was worth over 10k...

Thing is the person selling was tickled to get $20 for the assortment...

Knowing the true value of the items is necessary but lots of opportunity for those that do...
Many people don't have the time to deal with eBay. Then there's the storage issue. There are guarantees anything will sell on eBay. It's just another hassle for most folks handling a family member's estate. There's a time crunch to settle the estate as well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2018, 09:53 AM
 
Location: NJ
324 posts, read 116,995 times
Reputation: 1137
After my dad came out of the hospital he had a home visits by a physical therapist who said she paid for her daughter's housing in university by selling stuff on ebay. She went to yard sales and estate sales and sold on ebay. It sounded great to me but she had a whole business around it- with a barn for storage and it took a regular work day worth of hours to research items and price them.

I asked her what sold and what didn't. In her area old quality fishing reels were the money makers next to antique tools/ farm equipment and americana stuff. Small unique knick-knacks sold well to other countries but general or antique housewares- especially kitchen items and dishware were impossible to move.

Yes, it seems no one wants that nice old china anymore.

The only thing my husband and I ever made money on was magic the gathering cards. We made a bit of money from those- broke more than even but again it was a pain to store and heft boxes of them around. For collectibles like cards they need to be shipped carefully so the buyer can't complain about wear.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top