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Old 02-11-2018, 06:27 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,547 posts, read 17,563,101 times
Reputation: 16777

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Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
Yes, pianos don't sell. People don't play as much as they did. It can be hard to get rid of a spinet piano. And, if the insides are shot, it can cost quite a bit of money to get it fixed. But the older pianos do have better soundboards, I am told. And of course, some really older pianos have ivory keys, if they haven't already been plundered.
Not sure where I'd put it but would LOVE an older, smaller piano. I took lessons as a kid, and still remember how to play. I got an electric one but it doesn't work. I'd much rather have a real piano.

If they are as eager to get rid of them, maybe I should look for one. I could even put it in my unused room which needs to be sorted and emptied.

The electric one has soooooo many aps you can run and ad and pull in and all I want is the piano part.
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Old 02-11-2018, 10:57 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in America
12,304 posts, read 10,780,142 times
Reputation: 20540
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultrarunner View Post
Mission Style, Amish or Prairie Style... the kind of stuff Frank Loyd Write used is very popular here...

Walk into a two million dollar home in the Oakland Hills and I see a lot of the 1910 to 1940 mostly dark solid furnishings... simple and sturdy... my friend that did his house with it calls it Honest Furniture.

Below is a link to a local family owned business that does quite well... I have no connection with the store but it is popular for those in the East Bay...


Fenton MacLaren Home Furnishings - Home | Fenton MacLaren Home Furnishings
Frank Lloyd Wright not Write. You write letters.
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Old 02-12-2018, 05:51 AM
 
41 posts, read 23,787 times
Reputation: 81
This thread is timely for me as we are in the process of cleaning out 33 years worth of stuff in preparation for a move to a retirement community. Anything we didnt know what to do with went down to the basement. We are slowly digging out.

We made piles of the kids’ stuff for them to go through. They don’t even want their own childhood memorabilia! Never mind my china or silver. I still have some of my childhood things, but this generation just doesn’t seem to be as sentimental. This is OK, times change. We neglected cleaning out the basement for years and I always had nightmares of us dying and the kids having to deal with it, although they probably would have just gotten a dumpster and pitched it all. Their kids most likely won’t have to deal with basements full of junk since they don’t hold onto stuff like we did. That’s a good thing.
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Old 02-12-2018, 06:21 AM
 
673 posts, read 2,029,746 times
Reputation: 875
Quote:
Originally Posted by ss20ts View Post
Frank Lloyd Wright not Write. You write letters.
Funny!
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Old 02-12-2018, 07:50 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,622 posts, read 17,606,575 times
Reputation: 27695
Quote:
Originally Posted by cebuan View Post
I suspect that a great deal of the world's books -- maybe as many as 90% of them -- will never be opened again. I know people who move boxes of books from house to house to house without ever opening the box. There are warehouses full of old school textbooks. Publishers remainders. Library shelves jammed with books noone will ever check out. Used bookstores selling almost every book for a dime, nobody wants Alvin Toffler's "Future Shock", (there are ten in every Goodwill), or autobiographies of forgotten celebrities that sold millions, or old World Almanacs and Readers Digest condensed books...

But don't dare burn one, they're sacred.
Books have been the bane of my moves. At one point, I had hundreds of them, most of them were purchased at second-hand stores. I went through boxes of books a couple weeks ago, and many of them went into the city recycling bin.
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Old 02-12-2018, 07:56 AM
Status: "How long till Fall?" (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Where my bills arrive
8,141 posts, read 9,583,505 times
Reputation: 8169
Quote:
Originally Posted by Celeste16 View Post
This thread is timely for me as we are in the process of cleaning out 33 years worth of stuff in preparation for a move to a retirement community. Anything we didnt know what to do with went down to the basement. We are slowly digging out.

We made piles of the kidsí stuff for them to go through. They donít even want their own childhood memorabilia! Never mind my china or silver. I still have some of my childhood things, but this generation just doesnít seem to be as sentimental. This is OK, times change. We neglected cleaning out the basement for years and I always had nightmares of us dying and the kids having to deal with it, although they probably would have just gotten a dumpster and pitched it all. Their kids most likely wonít have to deal with basements full of junk since they donít hold onto stuff like we did. Thatís a good thing.
We went through this about 11 years ago when mom was moving out of her house of 50 years to a senior community. No one wants any of it, all good quality, all well made furniture, dishes, silver, chatcki's none of it. Being depression era my parents were not ones to get rid of anything that was still in good shape so you guessed it there were 50 year old flat sheets, clothes from every decade, small appliances that just needed whatever, I will admit though the 50 year old scotch was well aged....

My sister and I are older with well established households and other than 1 or 2 childhood things we didn't need anything. Moms service for 12 (with everything) was worth maybe $150 to the china consignment places, silverware the same. We filled a 40yd dumpster the really big one and packed it to the top in 2 days, there was that much stuff especially from the basement. We found a church group that took all the furniture without question and will put it to good use.

As you go through this remember the memory of what you find but realize you don't need it, no one wants it and yes it should have been thrown out years ago. To sum up the process for me I am sorry we didn't burn the house down, collect the insurance and sell the lot it would have been easier...
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Old 02-12-2018, 10:54 AM
 
26,591 posts, read 52,344,141 times
Reputation: 20438
Quote:
Originally Posted by ss20ts View Post
Frank Lloyd Wright not Write. You write letters.
Darn Spell Check strikes again...
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Old 02-12-2018, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Location: Happy Place
3,697 posts, read 1,876,337 times
Reputation: 11344
So far, after almost three months (next week) of retirement, I've gotten rid of almost 200 POUNDS of clothing sold on ebay (mod cut - no ads please).

I cannot tell you how wonderful it feels to lighten up my possessions. First the clothes, then the shoes. Already sold most of my costume jewelry....

My mother passed and had a small bag of clothing and one pair of shoes. #goals

Last edited by VTsnowbird; 02-12-2018 at 03:06 PM.. Reason: no ads
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Old 02-12-2018, 01:31 PM
 
26,591 posts, read 52,344,141 times
Reputation: 20438
In High school I helped some of the nuns relocate... they were all Teachers and went where directed.

For each, all their worldly processions fit in a single Steamer Trunk... plus what they were wearing...

Really puts things in prospective.
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Old 02-12-2018, 07:23 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,547 posts, read 17,563,101 times
Reputation: 16777
Quote:
Originally Posted by VA Yankee View Post
We went through this about 11 years ago when mom was moving out of her house of 50 years to a senior community. No one wants any of it, all good quality, all well made furniture, dishes, silver, chatcki's none of it. Being depression era my parents were not ones to get rid of anything that was still in good shape so you guessed it there were 50 year old flat sheets, clothes from every decade, small appliances that just needed whatever, I will admit though the 50 year old scotch was well aged....

My sister and I are older with well established households and other than 1 or 2 childhood things we didn't need anything. Moms service for 12 (with everything) was worth maybe $150 to the china consignment places, silverware the same. We filled a 40yd dumpster the really big one and packed it to the top in 2 days, there was that much stuff especially from the basement. We found a church group that took all the furniture without question and will put it to good use.

As you go through this remember the memory of what you find but realize you don't need it, no one wants it and yes it should have been thrown out years ago. To sum up the process for me I am sorry we didn't burn the house down, collect the insurance and sell the lot it would have been easier...
When I lost my home, and the stuff of my parents and grandparents I loved, I would have found a way to save it if possible. But I've been rebuilding my book collection. Most of it is non fiction. It doesn't matter what happens later, but for now it is a link with parents and family and all that is lost.

I wouldn't say that I want as much 'stuff' again, but I want some of what I had. I really miss having lost the period dresses I'd made, and have replaced a few. Its a bit of faith that I'll figure out how to get to go to cons again (science fiction conventions fyi) and wear them.

Most of all I'm getting my stories set up where they are on sites and I'd like to actually have them where they could be read on a tablet. Easier than to have to sit looking at a screen on your laptop.

I have not chosen to reclaim everything which was lost. Some is left to memory. Nothing will replace my parents things, though I've found a few things similar I enjoy using. But I value the stuff I want over just for me, and that matters very much.

I do think that the people who don't want old will wane and they'll find 'period' stuff their parents lived is fun too, and it will again appear on whatever has replaced shopping establishments then. Like how 60's is currently very popular again. Very groovy!
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