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Old 02-12-2018, 10:09 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
21,838 posts, read 14,349,419 times
Reputation: 30688

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultrarunner View Post
Mission Style, Amish or Prairie Style... the kind of stuff Frank Loyd Write used is very popular here...

Walk into a two million dollar home in the Oakland Hills and I see a lot of the 1910 to 1940 mostly dark solid furnishings... simple and sturdy... my friend that did his house with it calls it Honest Furniture.

Below is a link to a local family owned business that does quite well... I have no connection with the store but it is popular for those in the East Bay...


Fenton MacLaren Home Furnishings - Home | Fenton MacLaren Home Furnishings
wacky tacky: The "Early American" Revolution: A War for Mid-Century Independence

This the sort of stuff I was saying probably went to the dumpster.

In the sixties and seventies there was a lot of collecting of high end pieces by rich collectors. Their homes would have had Shaker style wood pieces. Some were no doubt collecting actual period antiques made of fine woods like mahogany. But the stuff I encountered in my friendsí homes and in department stores was like the things in the above article. And, honestly I saw worse stuff in my MILís house.

It seems to me that most of the people I encountered had Early American style furniture. (My mother favored a more eclectic style that included modern pieces. Later she got heavily involved in old oak pieces.)
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Old 02-13-2018, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,557 posts, read 17,535,380 times
Reputation: 27607
Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
wacky tacky: The "Early American" Revolution: A War for Mid-Century Independence

This the sort of stuff I was saying probably went to the dumpster.

In the sixties and seventies there was a lot of collecting of high end pieces by rich collectors. Their homes would have had Shaker style wood pieces. Some were no doubt collecting actual period antiques made of fine woods like mahogany. But the stuff I encountered in my friendsí homes and in department stores was like the things in the above article. And, honestly I saw worse stuff in my MILís house.

It seems to me that most of the people I encountered had Early American style furniture. (My mother favored a more eclectic style that included modern pieces. Later she got heavily involved in old oak pieces.)
To me, this just looks like average, older stuff. My grandparents have pieces similar to that. They're regular furniture pieces. They aren't valuable due to exquisite craftsmanship or rarity.
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Old 02-13-2018, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Surf City, NC
364 posts, read 552,696 times
Reputation: 946
My college boyfriend's folks had a home full of high-style Mid-Century Modern from Herman Miller, but with 8 kids my folks had a mixture of hand-me downs and cheap MCM knock-offs. It's true that the majority of their well-off friends and people I babysat for had Early American, though, home furnishings by Ethan Allen. There was an enormous Colonial Revival going on, sparked off by Colonial Williamsburg and collectors in New England and Philadelphia (Winterthur) etc. Locally here in North Carolina, the society dames were so frustrated that they had no such landmarks as Williamsburg to restore that they rebuilt the Governor's mansion in New Bern from scratch. They actually moved a highway and a bridge to do it. It was a search for history and to lay claim to ancestral "American" culture and class.
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Old 02-13-2018, 12:27 PM
 
659 posts, read 324,436 times
Reputation: 1974
I used to be an avid flea marketer and antique show/store patron. I collected various items made of old pewter; and also glass fan vases; beginning in the late 80s. So now I have these huge collections to get rid of. I lost interest in collecting in the early 2000s when the thrill of the physical hunt and collecting was replaced by Ebay.

I am inventorying my fan vase collection now, and using Ebay as a comparison to identify and price pieces. Vases I paid $50 for are worth less than half that now. I have a loose plan to sell pieces off online, but wish I could get an antique dealer to make me an offer to cart off the whole thing. They are housed in a beautiful double door lighted solid light wood and glass collector's cabinet. That will be another pain to get rid off.

I decided to slowly sell off my important possessions so my two sons won't have to deal with it. I'll probably move within the next 5 years to a smaller place and also don't want to have to deal with downsizing all at once.
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Old 02-13-2018, 03:02 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,827 posts, read 18,832,665 times
Reputation: 33722
Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
wacky tacky: The "Early American" Revolution: A War for Mid-Century Independence

This the sort of stuff I was saying probably went to the dumpster.

In the sixties and seventies there was a lot of collecting of high end pieces by rich collectors. Their homes would have had Shaker style wood pieces. Some were no doubt collecting actual period antiques made of fine woods like mahogany. But the stuff I encountered in my friendsí homes and in department stores was like the things in the above article. And, honestly I saw worse stuff in my MILís house.

It seems to me that most of the people I encountered had Early American style furniture. (My mother favored a more eclectic style that included modern pieces. Later she got heavily involved in old oak pieces.)
Most people in my town either had real antiques or furniture that came from their families or reproductions of styles like Chippendale or Queen Anne. My parents in the '50s had a mish mash--second hand furniture from auctions and from relatives. My parents said they would buy new furniture when we kids were grown up. New furniture wasn't worth having when you had young kids messing it up. They couldn't afford it anyway.

Sure enough, they finally bought new furniture and it was "modern." A gigantic orange lamp on the coffee table, a modernistic couch, bedroom furniture that was blonde wood. And they got rid of the old dining room set and got an Ethan Allen table and chairs. I didn't like any of it. It was boring. I liked Danish Modern.

I do remember seeing a lot of that cheap "early American" furniture after I went away to college when I visited new friends. I totally hated it and thought it looked really tacky. Couches with ruffles along the bottom, coffee tables that were supposed to resemble cobblers' benches, containers for magazines that looked like barrels, poor quality furniture made of pine and stained to make you think it was maple. Very odd, clunky looking stuff. I think that was late '60s.

The Ethan Allen furniture still seems to be in demand. It wasn't really high end but it was pretty well built and at least they used maple, not some soft pine. I always loved cedar chests and have one that was my mother's--nothing fancy but it's art deco style. The other cedar chest is smaller and was made by my mother's father who died fairly young. Cedar chests are still selling. I see them being sold online and I sold my Lane cedar chest last year. What do today's young people do without cedar chests? Do they not wear wool? Do they put things into air proof bags with cedar chips? I just wonder because I have such a soft spot for cedar chests and couldn't live without one.
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Old 02-13-2018, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,547 posts, read 17,534,193 times
Reputation: 16771
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
Most people in my town either had real antiques or furniture that came from their families or reproductions of styles like Chippendale or Queen Anne. My parents in the '50s had a mish mash--second hand furniture from auctions and from relatives. My parents said they would buy new furniture when we kids were grown up. New furniture wasn't worth having when you had young kids messing it up. They couldn't afford it anyway.

Sure enough, they finally bought new furniture and it was "modern." A gigantic orange lamp on the coffee table, a modernistic couch, bedroom furniture that was blonde wood. And they got rid of the old dining room set and got an Ethan Allen table and chairs. I didn't like any of it. It was boring. I liked Danish Modern.

I do remember seeing a lot of that cheap "early American" furniture after I went away to college when I visited new friends. I totally hated it and thought it looked really tacky. Couches with ruffles along the bottom, coffee tables that were supposed to resemble cobblers' benches, containers for magazines that looked like barrels, poor quality furniture made of pine and stained to make you think it was maple. Very odd, clunky looking stuff. I think that was late '60s.

The Ethan Allen furniture still seems to be in demand. It wasn't really high end but it was pretty well built and at least they used maple, not some soft pine. I always loved cedar chests and have one that was my mother's--nothing fancy but it's art deco style. The other cedar chest is smaller and was made by my mother's father who died fairly young. Cedar chests are still selling. I see them being sold online and I sold my Lane cedar chest last year. What do today's young people do without cedar chests? Do they not wear wool? Do they put things into air proof bags with cedar chips? I just wonder because I have such a soft spot for cedar chests and couldn't live without one.
My living room is in desperate need of storage which doesn't look like a plastic crate.... this suggest way better ideas. I should check and see. I need to be able to find it, but not have to pile it in a box. Hmmmm..

I'm trying to do more like my grandmothers stuff than the cheapie breakable plastic age. I made my computer table, and as they needed to be a specific side, the couch and side piece.
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Old 02-13-2018, 04:40 PM
 
13,314 posts, read 25,546,272 times
Reputation: 20486
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sand&Salt View Post
Yep. I think this is why I've seen so many pianos and organs in retirement facilities. Kids didn't want 'em, so donated to the rest home....
I think a piano of some kind used to be a sign of having arrived in the middle class and people aspired to have a piano, like having a hutch to display dishes or having carpet instead of bare floor. There were so many hopes for the middle class life embodied in stuff that had to be "attained."

I don't think pianos serve that purpose any more.
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Old 02-13-2018, 04:50 PM
 
Location: Earth
238 posts, read 84,534 times
Reputation: 1013
Now it's a 75" home theater TV.
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Old 02-13-2018, 08:58 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,827 posts, read 18,832,665 times
Reputation: 33722
Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
I think a piano of some kind used to be a sign of having arrived in the middle class and people aspired to have a piano, like having a hutch to display dishes or having carpet instead of bare floor. There were so many hopes for the middle class life embodied in stuff that had to be "attained."

I don't think pianos serve that purpose any more.
We only had an old upright so we could take piano lessons. But I agree about some of those old pianos because one home I used to babysit in had a huge grand piano topped by a sterling silver tea service.
That must have been for a show of wealth. China cabinets too. For me (and I still have a hutch) the hutch is just a place to keep my good dishes. That I never use, of course.

For some today, a MacMansion is the way to show of their wealth. Who is going to want those things especially when people don't even want furniture!
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my posts as moderator will be in red. Moderator: Health&Wellness~Genealogy. The Rules--read here>>> TOS. If someone attacks you, do not reply. Hit REPORT.
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Old 02-13-2018, 09:48 PM
 
26,589 posts, read 52,257,058 times
Reputation: 20405
Quote:
Originally Posted by westegg View Post
Now it's a 75" home theater TV.
I would have to agree... the Home Theater... even with low income families in subsidized housing is very much a status symbol...

I have never lived in a home with Cable... or Satellite and the old 1980 Zenith Console works just fine with rabbit ears... over 60 stations and at least 1/3 are English!

Some of the old cars I bought were just bought because they were cheap and I liked them... today... they have appreciated nicely... cars from the 50's and 60's... convertibles and cars like Mustangs and Cougars...
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