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Old 02-03-2018, 11:05 AM
 
26,591 posts, read 52,313,328 times
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Hard to say... one generations treasure is another's junk but since generations are always in flux so is demand.

A lot of the old farmers cleaned up and burned a lot of stuff after WWII... at least around my Grandparents farm... things like butter churns, spinning wheels, etc...

Now there are sought after... not talking big money but they sell...

I collect cars... have 50 assorted vehicles... they have been all over the place price wise... up and down and as tastes or the economy ebbs and flows so do the prices.

Doubt anyone in my family would want any of it... Bank CD sure... not even sure about the Real Estate... wanted to set up my nieces and nephews and the parents were dead set against it... saying the last thing a teen needs to know is they have a house because it will rob them of the opportunity/satisfaction of earning it themselves.
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Old 02-03-2018, 11:09 AM
 
26,591 posts, read 52,313,328 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ss20ts View Post
Antiques? Nope. Not interested. All those knick knacks? Oh hell no! I don't need a house full of dust collectors. My parents know that none of us want their stuff. There's a few dishes my sister used to want. There's a rocking chair I want because it belonged to my great grandmother and I used to love rocking in that chair. That's all the 3 of us kids want.

I know it's my responsibility to clean out the house. My siblings want nothing to do with it. So my plan is to bring in a dumpster. Pitch whatever needs to be pitched. Donate whatever can be donated. Anything that may have value will be dealt with by an estate seller. That's it. No sitting on the stuff for 3 years. No crying over everything. My parents are hoarders so I expect to find gross things. For YEARS there were a couple of dead cardinals in the freezer in the basement. So I can only imagine what I'm in for!
I had a great aunt that lived a very simple life... she did have things important to her and at 85 moved to a retirement home... the family paired down things very quickly in that she was limited to what she could take to the retirement home.

It was causing this otherwise upbeat and dear lady stress...

I stepped in and said I have a single detached garage and would be happy to store anything she wanted and I did...

Over the following years I would let her know of a family that could use a dining table of chest of drawers... even her refrigerator... SHE WAS MORE THAN HAPPY TO GIVE THEM TO SOMEONE THAT NEEDED THEM.

Her stress was caused because others were making decisions for her and putting NO value on her feelings or her belongings...

I believe this is very important and was glad to have been able to help... I still have her 1959 Rambler, the only car she had ever owned... when she was alive a couple of times a year I would pick her up with it all clean and polished and she was beaming...
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Old 02-03-2018, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,890 posts, read 25,331,777 times
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I am anti-clutter! After cleaning up after all my dead relatives I never want to see the stuff again. My mom was upset that I didn't get my grandma's silver. We don't know who did, it disappeared very mysteriously! But I told mom I didn't want it. I had already polished it more than enough times in my life!
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Old 02-03-2018, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Tucson Arizona
3,901 posts, read 1,656,975 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yourown2feet View Post
And the funny thing is, 30 years ago, you couldn't give mid-century modern away. It carried the baggage of "what our parents [those annoying people, who were always telling us what to do] had." Just as we usually don't care for the music or clothing of the previous generation.
yah, MCM looks like garage sale junk to me.

But the fabulous silver and china and crystal goodies that cost a mint 30 years ago are now unwanted junk. I know this because I'm trying to sell mine!
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Old 02-03-2018, 11:53 AM
 
568 posts, read 249,414 times
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I'm so glad I went through the exercise recently of clearing out all my accumulated rubbish from generations past. I scanned photos, donated china and household items, keeping only what was serviceable and could hold in a 1 bedroom apartment. It's amazing how much lighter one feels at the end of it!
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Old 02-03-2018, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Chicago area
14,407 posts, read 7,929,570 times
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If anyone has a Columbia Grafonola Deluxe phonograph that's been unmolested I'll buy it. Yes, some old things are not sought after but imagine paying over one hundred dollars for an old 78 Edison record. Everything has it's cycle. I remember when Victorian furniture was the rage. Now it's about half of what it used to be. That being said there are still treasures out there that are bargains. I missed a Chicago Mosaic lamp with a tree base that used to go for around ten thousand and sold for a thousand three hundred. Rats. I've wanted one for decades. I wish Flow Blue china would come down in price. I have my great grandmother's Alaska serving bowls and platters. I've been looking for dishes, cups and saucers forever. One dish can be a hundred dollars or more. It just goes to show you that not everything is just unwanted old junk.
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Old 02-03-2018, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in America
12,304 posts, read 10,771,871 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by animalcrazy View Post
If anyone has a Columbia Grafonola Deluxe phonograph that's been unmolested I'll buy it. Yes, some old things are not sought after but imagine paying over one hundred dollars for an old 78 Edison record. Everything has it's cycle. I remember when Victorian furniture was the rage. Now it's about half of what it used to be. That being said there are still treasures out there that are bargains. I missed a Chicago Mosaic lamp with a tree base that used to go for around ten thousand and sold for a thousand three hundred. Rats. I've wanted one for decades. I wish Flow Blue china would come down in price. I have my great grandmother's Alaska serving bowls and platters. I've been looking for dishes, cups and saucers forever. One dish can be a hundred dollars or more. It just goes to show you that not everything is just unwanted old junk.
Those prices will also dramatically vary by area. I see you're in the Chicago area so your prices may be higher than mine....small town middle of nowhere. Plenty of antiques around here and they say sales are nothing like they used to be. We're seeing antique shops close up here....just not enough customers or buyers nowadays. Big difference between big city. Here it's mostly tourists. Not easy to get home furniture....case of wine is much easier to transport!
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Old 02-03-2018, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Dallas
5,601 posts, read 4,937,921 times
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I love antiques, especially from the Belle Epoque and Art Nouveau era. It surprises me people want that mid-century junk that I grew up with and detest, but to each their own.

I'll have to start hitting some estate sales and auctions since it seems to be the common thought in this thread that you can barely give antiques away now.
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Old 02-03-2018, 01:04 PM
Status: "0-0-2 Game On!" (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
7,304 posts, read 15,356,670 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by animalcrazy View Post
If anyone has a Columbia Grafonola Deluxe phonograph that's been unmolested I'll buy it.
The spouse fixes old radio gear and stereo gear (although the bulk of his business is old/older guitar amps). SOME of it can be fixed, some of it the tubes are just too esoteric and the only hope is NOS (new old stock). For a great deal of money he can redesign it to use newer tubes, but it's really not worth it. People bring him various old radios and when they find out it will cost several hundred bucks to fix something worth $20-$30, they often decide that perhaps it will be best as a shelf ornament.
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Old 02-03-2018, 01:27 PM
 
5,798 posts, read 9,306,491 times
Reputation: 6008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultrarunner View Post
I had a great aunt that lived a very simple life... she did have things important to her and at 85 moved to a retirement home... the family paired down things very quickly in that she was limited to what she could take to the retirement home.

It was causing this otherwise upbeat and dear lady stress...

I stepped in and said I have a single detached garage and would be happy to store anything she wanted and I did...

Over the following years I would let her know of a family that could use a dining table of chest of drawers... even her refrigerator... SHE WAS MORE THAN HAPPY TO GIVE THEM TO SOMEONE THAT NEEDED THEM.

Her stress was caused because others were making decisions for her and putting NO value on her feelings or her belongings...

I believe this is very important and was glad to have been able to help... I still have her 1959 Rambler, the only car she had ever owned... when she was alive a couple of times a year I would pick her up with it all clean and polished and she was beaming...
You did a kind and wonderful thing for your great aunt. My father, a knowledgeable collector and buyer of antiques for various antique stores back in the '60s and '70, was haunted by the thought of having to go into a nursing home, and decisions having to be made about his collections. As it happened, he was fortunate enough to be able to stay in his home until his final days after having spent almost 100 years on this earth, and he was reassured that I respected his collections, and would take care of everything. And that I did, and it has haunted me for a long time! By the time he passed away, there was no market at all for most of his precious collectibles, so I ended up giving much of his collections to relatives, selling the best pieces that I had no room for, shipping a container full of items I couldn't part with to myself (like heirlooms from great-grandparents, and 1/3 of my dad's library), and donating the rest.

For the first couple of years after my dad's passing I could not do swap meets, because for one thing, they reminded me of all my parents' things still stored in boxes in our storage space! And for another, I would torture myself by agonizing about not getting better prices for the things I sold (I am not a natural salesperson), and for donating things that might have been worth something. And then, one Sunday morning at a swap meet, I decided to "forgive myself" and let it go. Relatives and strangers are enjoying my dad's collectibles now, and I find comfort in that. Inherited things can be a blessing and a millstone at the same time. I actually don't think I could have done any better. My dad passed away with his peace of mind intact, I have a storage space full of memories, and I earned enough money through the sales to pay for the shipment and the clean-up of his apartment. Not a bad compromise, actually.

This little story is just for those who, like me, are attached to heirlooms and leftovers from happy days and beloved family members: easy solutions are probably rare!
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